Cheapest Cialis 20mg Priceline Pharmacy Acai Garlic Pills Coumadin Order Accutane Canada Buy Allopurinol Online No Prescription

Tesco slammed by customers online for gender-biased toys


5:59 pm - May 5th 2013

by Sunny Hundal    


      Share on Tumblr

The retailer Tesco sis the latest to come under fire from customers for selling toys divided by gender.

The difference was highlighted by the campaign Let Toys Be Toys, who posted this picture last week.

.

A message from Let Toys be Toys on Twitter also brought a response from Tesco.

.

Unsurprisingly, the Tweet from Tesco attracted a vitriol response from others on Twitter.

Here are some of the responses.

You can read more of the responses here.

It’s likely that Tesco will relent sooner or later.

More recently, toy companies such as Hamleys and even Boots have reversed their policy of specifying which toys are suitable for different genders.

    Share on Tumblr   submit to reddit  


About the author
Sunny Hundal is editor of LC. Also: on Twitter, at Pickled Politics and Guardian CIF.
· Other posts by


Story Filed Under: News

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.


Reader comments


1. Fiddling while rome burns

Are you actually kidding me? THIS is the sort of “important issue” that we should be concerning ourselves right now?

But no, keep it up. I’m sure arguing with Tesco on Twitter about something completely irrelevant. You’re a true hero of journalism.

2. Mr Crocus

@Nero – remarkably, it is in fact possible to concern yourself with more than one issue at a time. But it’s nice to know that you concern yourself with the important issue of other people’s apparently misplaced concern about apparently unimportant issues.

3. the a&e charge nurse

What sort of inconsiderate parent would consider shopping for gauche play materials of this type – surely they are only on the website to fulfil some sort of esoteric niche in the retro market?

Nowadays children only know how to play with (or should that be interface with) genderless, and highly addictive computer gadgets.

Todays young mind needs a constant barrage of new stimulus, the sort that can only be provided by nano-technology, otherwise the hard to please child simply switches off.

I refuse to believe parents still buy chemistry since their only known application is the manufacture of stink bombs (iron filings + sulphuric acid)

4. Charlieman

@3. the a&e charge nurse: “I refuse to believe parents still buy chemistry since their only known application is the manufacture of stink bombs (iron filings + sulphuric acid).”

Err, iron sulphide and hydrochloric acid is a more reliable recipe. You make the iron sulphide by combining iron filings with sulphur over heat. Hydrochloric acid is available from a variety of industrial processes.

Parents who wish to educate their children in chemistry might look at crystal growing sets which do not produce stinks or bangs. It is fun for a 7+ year old and the chemicals are not seriously toxic.

@4

If this is what socialism is all about then no wonder it’s a joke.

Does Sunny even consider himself or his site socialist?

Well he’s definitely not right wing. If I’m being simplistic in equating left wing with socialism then my bad, but it’s just the same as equating right wing with baby eating capitalist scum.

I’m bored of the idiots / trolls coming on here screaming hysterically about whether they consider this sort of stuff serious or not… or whether it advances their agenda.

Let me be clear: I don’t care what you think. We publish a variety of content. If you don’t like it – don’t comment or go read another blog.

Cooking is largely chemistry, and chemistry sets could make use of this.

9. Shatterface

Unsurprisingly, the Tweet from Tesco attracted a vitriol response from others on Twitter.

It’s Twitter: you could post ‘Be happy!’ and get a vitriolic response.

Purveying gender-based toys is the least of the long list of customer complaints about Tesco.

For starters, try market dominance or the regular discrepancies between posted shelf prices and what customers get charged at the checkouts.

I stopped doing my regular grocery shopping at Tesco’s years ago when it got to my having rows every week over the differences between posted prices and checkout prices. A kindly checkout assistant first warned me to check the prices and so I followed that advice. Of course, checking that shelf prices match the prices at the checkouts involves additional administration costs and that hurts Tesco profits.

11. white trash

@BobB – Until quite recently Tesco had bouts of offering double your money back if you managed to detect such discrepancies. I’ve had a good few quid off them on that, and afaik no other supermarket has ever offered to do that although many of them have the same issue. Poor labelling of shelf space is another more dodgy practice that often happens in many grocery shops and can end up with customers who don’t bother to check their receipts losing out.

As for this idiotic idea that customers want to be directed online to buy hideously dull mini plastic representations of household gadgets to subject their daughters to, well shame on you Tesco!

And yes I do see this is an important issue. As someone who was once a girl and so might have been forced into this sort of narrow brain-washing by parents or relatives, it looks a bit like Tesco saying “and for our black customers, we’d like to offer a lovely range of slavery-themed toys; fetters, ball and chain, neck collar …”

We can accuse Tesco of all sorts of vices but Im struggling with this one. I take it we’re not actually objecting to the toys Tesco are flogging just their categorization. In which case why stop at gender bias, Tesco’s vegetarian and kosher sections say, are also indicative of collective preferences.

@12 Can you really not figure out the difference?
Vegetarians aren’t ever going to want to eat meat, by definition. Many young girls, however, are going to want to play with chemistry sets because they’re fucking ace.

14. white trash

FFS @12 Libcon really should start offering awards in water-muddying for the experts here.

As Dan points out there’s no comparison between the things you’re trying to pretend to compare.

For one thing these crappy excuses for “toys” that are being foisted on some young people simply because they’ve been born without a penis, are not directed at and sold to the end-consumer herself – she has no choice in the matter – but to those who seek to condition her young mind into a life of servitude.

And yes, I do object to such useless rubbish as the thing pictured being pushed at children.

In a consumer society one of the most subversive things you can do is attack the advertising stoking up the constant demand for *stuff* . Let toys be toys misses that mark by a country mile, because it’s saying the advertising would be ok if it were tweaked. There’s another campaign called ‘Leave Our Kids Alone’ which Caroline Lucas and Monbiot have signed up to and thats going for an absolute – vastly better. The MSM seems to be favouring ‘Let toys be toys’ though, I wonder if that’s because LTBT’s demand doesnt threaten the principle of advertising revenue.

I don’t see Let Toys be Toys as in competition with Leave Our Kids Alone at all, both are borne out of the discontent with rampant consumerism and the way it manipulates children. A victory for Let Toys be Toys would be a step towards Leave Our Kids Alone.

One campaign is saying ads should not be aimed at kids at all. The LTBT campaign is for ads aimed at kids to be improved.

In practice, companies are not going to voluntarily give up advertising to children unless there is substantial consumer pressure for them to do so (and no government is going to ban them). Let Toys be Toys, if they are successful, is a precedent of such consumer pressure working. The idea that it works against Leave Our Kids Alone is absurd.

I don’t expect Leave Our Kids Alone will ever be completely successful, the best that can be hoped for is small incremental improvements as companies realise their exploitative advertising strategies will lose them customers.

20. chris redmond

If you object to the classification go elsewhere, what’s the problem? Personally if I’m shopping online and want to buy a present for a boy I don’t want to waste time having to scroll through dolls, make-up, toy ovens etc, but if I didn’t want to restrict the boy to ‘boy’s’ toys I could of course browse the ‘girl’s’ toys as well.
Get a life.

Damn those misogynist toys! This is rape culture!!!

OK, but seriously, this is an example of the tendency to politicise everything, which I don’t think is very healthy.

Sunny

Re: Your comment

“I’m bored of the idiots / trolls coming on here screaming hysterically about whether they consider this sort of stuff serious or not… or whether it advances their agenda…..If you don’t like it – don’t comment or go read another blog.

Goats and monkeys, man! If that’s how you feel, what do you think passing readers and observers think, and then actually go on to do?

The overall impression given by this policy of carrying a wide diversity of topics without any estimate,let alone a weighing their actual public significance and relevance to the world outside the web appears to one of moral relativism. Of course, this may reflect a substantialnumber of people who sharesuch a view, judging by their comments.

Such a take on life is not unocmmon, but insociety today does have a negative effect in daily life in practical citizen-state interractions.I have seen with many people in trouble with Government, the law and regulatory bodies over the years who have displayed an unfortunate lack of ability to distinguish between what is important and what is not in life, together with and a confusion between what are essentially public matters and what are private personal opinions and issues parading as public issues.

Dr Johnson put it one way:

‘How small of all that human hearts endure
That part which laws or kings can cause or cure’

Obviously, one cannot know what your personal motivations are, but if you introduce primarily personal or trivial issues into the public sphere then adverse comment will follow. However, perhaps the point of this site is to imitate Montaigne when he wrote in his marvellously honest way:

“I cannot too much stress with how little an expense to my peace of mind I have lived half my life in my house, while my country was in ruins.”

“remarkably, it is in fact possible to concern yourself with more than one issue at a time. But it’s nice to know that you concern yourself with the important issue of other people’s apparently misplaced concern about apparently unimportant issues.”

This has become the mantra of the sort of cultural feminism that obsesses over this stuff, but I think I ought to remind you of what Nye Bevan said:

“The language of priorities is the religion of socialism”

It is a simple fact that some issues are more important than others and if the left can’t prioritise the more important ones then its energies will be spread too thinly and nothing will ever get done. This is why socialists get so annoyed by this sort of culturalist approach.

25. ludicrous pseudonym

@24

it’s also why in the bad old days some “socialists” didn’t give a shit about women getting the vote. swings and roundabouts, old chap.

yeah in the grand scheme of things sexist advertising isn’t the Big Problem but it is still a problem, and it would be nice if megacorps like Tesco didn’t play up to gender stereotypes. girls like chemistry too nowadays…

26. Charlieman

@24. Chris: “It is a simple fact that some issues are more important than others and if the left can’t prioritise the more important ones then its energies will be spread too thinly and nothing will ever get done. This is why socialists get so annoyed by this sort of culturalist approach.”

I am unworried about stupid product branding of children’s toys; it makes the seller look foolish. But I am worried when people are dismissive of minority interest campaigners

There are some on the “left” (of which I would not describe myself as a member) who wish to renationalise the railways etc. There are others who campaign for fair pay in a company that employs 20 women amongst 200 men.

Little campaigns can change lives. Lots of little campaigns change more lives, and they create an activism culture. Easy wins are great at creating confidence for something a little bigger.

27. Derek Hattons Tailor

As a parent I have to say I find this debate absurd, and generally indulged in by twee, smug, small c conservative, middle class yummy mummies trying to look like trendy, socially concerned parents. They tend to inhabit mumsnet and starbucks between school runs in the 4×4. Children don’t generally buy their own toys online and the fact is, there is so much stuff available that if you don’t have all day it is helpful to have it divided up (segmented to use marketing speak). They also segment it by age, price, indoor/outdoor, adventure, sport etc etc. It helps me make a choice, and therefore increases sales, which is the only reason they do it.
At this point someone will think I shouldn’t assume my children will conform to gender stereotype, maybe not, but they mostly do. Yes, some girls will like chemistry sets and some boys will like pink fluffy animals, but that does not alter the fact that most won’t, and that boys will generally be more interested in footballs and toy guns than they will in barbie dolls and fairy outfits, and no-one wants to buy their children a toy they won’t play with.
Most online retailers divide their market up, and gender is the most obvious division. I’m probably not going to buy sanitary towels and Mrs Hatton probably isn’t going to buy shaving cream, so Boots, or whoever, divide their website into Men/Women, and no one ever complains about that.

This is normal for such a big over powering company like Tesco. Check this out!!!!


Reactions: Twitter, blogs
  1. Liberal Conspiracy: Tesco slammed by customers online for gender-biased toys | moonblogsfromsyb

    […] via Sunny Hundal Liberal Conspiracy http://liberalconspiracy.org/2013/05/05/tesco-slammed-by-customers-online-for-gender-biased-toys/ […]

  2. The MacBites Podcast – MacBites Episode 0075

    […] Pink still stinks […]

  3. His and Hers: Gender Specific Online Shopping Habits - Blog - Marketing to the Sexes and Men Vs. Women

    […] the toy company Tesco felt the heat of consumers who didn’t appreciate the way that the company profiled toys like chemistry sets for boys and toy […]





Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.