Tory MP: unemployment benefits should be a loan


9:30 am - November 26th 2012

by Sunny Hundal    


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Chris Skidmore, MP for Kingswood, and a member of the Free Enterprise Group, has an idea to ‘reform’ the welfare state.

For individuals aged under 25 who have not yet paid National Insurance contributions for a certain period, perhaps five years, unemployment benefit should be in the form of a repayable loan.

An unemployed teenager would still receive the same amount of cash as now, for example, but they would be expected to repay the value once in work.

Ahh. Otherwise known as keeping people in poverty even after they’ve started earning.

His own calculations show it would save barely £1.3bn a year. For that he’s willing to keep some people in poverty.

Other bright ideas:

People over 25 without a contribution record should be obliged to join the Work Programme or an alternative welfare-to-work scheme within three months of beginning to claim – but a record of contribution should delay this requirement incrementally.

Again – this has very little to do with masses of young people deliberately staying on benefits because they’re generous. Young people are on benefits because there aren’t enough jobs to go around.

If the Tories actually did something to grow the economy and create jobs this wouldn’t be an issue. Instead of that task they want to focus on cutting benefits.

(hat-tip Eoin Clarke)

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About the author
Sunny Hundal is editor of LC. Also: on Twitter, at Pickled Politics and Guardian CIF.
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Reader comments


1. caroline molloy

What’s next, debtors prisons?

They should all have to live in a special house and make baskets. We need baskets.

Sounds like a pretty fine idea to me. The repayments could be kept very low, and considering they have not yet contributed through income tax I thinks its a decent idea.

Of course what we should really see happen is the personal income tax allowance go to 12k a year. If you want the poor to have more money stop taxing them so damn much, because once these people are making it into work they are still be taxed insane amounts.

Unless you of course support a prolifigate society where you earn more not to work.

@3 There are taxes other than income tax you know.

5. Chaise Guevara

@ 4 Cylux

To be fair, I entirely support Freemen’s policy on raising the minimum tax bracket, although obviously we’d need to make up the shortfall by taxing the rich more.

@ Freeman

“If you want the poor to have more money stop taxing them so damn much”

Yes.

“Of course what we should really see happen is the personal income tax allowance go to 12k a year.”

No.

Raising the personal allowance for everyone (or nearly everyone) is an appallingly inefficient way to reduce the net tax burden on the poor. For every £1 by which this policy reduces the net tax burden on low- to middle-income households, the government loses an additional £2 in revenue from middle- to high-income households.

And of course, raising the personal allowance is of the least benefit to the poorest households – those whose incomes are below or just above the current level of that allowance. Think about who ‘the poor’ actually are: elderly people scraping by on the state pension and pension credit, single parents juggling child caring responsibilities with low-paid part-time work, etc. The tax burden on these households has nothing to do with income tax.

If you want to reduce the net tax burden on the poor, the cost-effective, targeted solution is to offer (effectively) rebates of whatever tax they actually pay – whether that’s income tax, VAT, National Insurance or whatever else – via the benefits/tax credits system.

People who support the raising of the tax threshold are either 1 – right-wingers pursuing a Thatcherite agenda of reducing direct and increasing indirect taxation (which inevitably means the tax burden rising for the poor and falling for the better-off), or 2 – well-meaning lefties who have been taken in by the rhetoric about ‘lifting the low paid out of tax’.

@ 6 G.O.

The reality doesn’t bear this out though – raising the tax free threshold and cutting the top rate of tax has actually *increased* government income tax revenues.

Example of the Laffer curve out in the wild as it were.

Tyler, you have absolutely no evidence regarding cutting the top rate of tax because the figures arent yet available.

Backside, talking out of.

Wouldn’t this make some people less likely to want to work as they would not want to repay the loan?

And how much would the rate of interest be?

They don’t even pretend anymore do they. Tory party will never change. Cameron can lie all he likes about a new, changed, nicer tory party. It will never happen. The only cretins who believe it is the Lib Dems who keep the tories in power.

The typical tory is selfish greedy, and has a hatred for the poor. Welfare is for the rich, corporations and tory MPs like this clown. The Free Enterprise group is another right wing corporate welfare group, like the heritage foundation, the Cato, the Adam Smith institute, TPA who are funded by the rich to promote propaganda for the……er rich. They will not be happy until they have returned the west to a feudal system of slavery and child labour.

@ Tyler

“raising the tax free threshold and cutting the top rate of tax has actually *increased* government income tax revenues.”

Huh? Income tax revenues have *fallen* this year. That’s been one of the main reasons for all the extra borrowing.

On a ‘before’ and ‘after’ snapshot basis, if we’re playing that game, tax receipts were 7% lower immediately after the tax changes you’re talking about than they were a year earlier.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2012/jun/26/uk-government-borrowing-higher-expected

Quite funny. If you go on the Free Enterprise web site there is a rogues gallery of some 40 tory mps all signed up to so called free enterprise. Yet all of them receiving £65000 tax payers salaries. £100,000 tax payers expense accounts, and all the tax paid for goodies they can get their snouts into.

The usual array of farming interests and, military industrial complex hypocrites. No such thing as free enterprise or free markets. Perhaps they would like to pay back all the tax payers money they have taken out of the system? Oh sill sally, that is only for the little people.

Tyler troll taking bollocks as usual. The whole tory, Tyler philosophy of the last 30 years has collapsed. How I remember Chancellors like Howe, and Lawson, and other tories telling us if we reduced tax for the rich, it would make them less likely to avoid tax. So taxes for the rich came down. Income tax halfed,corporation tax reduced, an array of tax loopholes set up to help the rich avoid tax and where has it got us?

Huge tax avoidance, now. The rich don’t want to pay any tax and many of them don’t. Even council tax is being avoided by some rich people as their houses and flats are transferred to shady trusts that are kept off shore. It is the same as the tory myth that self regulation would be ok because business men are geniuses who would never destroy their own businesses. HA HA HA look at the banks. Bailed out to save their skins. The whole tory intellectual argument is a crock of shit devised to keep the rich in luxury and the little people in their place.

Here’s an idea, people could pay a small contribution out of their wages and receive support for unemployment and sickness, it would be a national insurance scheme. We could call it erm National Insurance ;)

We would have the confidence that someone unemployed at the start of their working loves will not remain so for ever. So by the time they retire thay will almost certainbly be in “credit”

Beverage came up with a perfectly workable system 70 years ago, it is not the fault of the workers under 25 that the jobs no longer exist

Oh dear, Tyler got caught making stuff up again. Still a liar.

16. Topperfalkon

I thought the whole point of NI contributions was to pay for unemployment benefits. You know, once someone becomes employed, they’ll pay NI, which will pay off their benefits.

Amazing, isn’t it?

17. Man on Clapham Omnibus

3. Freeman

‘Unless you of course support a prolifigate society where you earn more not to work’

A slight variation to this is being paid not in relation to the work you do.Examples include being a CEO/Banker/Hedge Fund manager where remuneration is not based on the laws of supply and demand but who you know or the vagaries of markets which accentuate the wealth of the rich.

As to whether the society is profligate in the way you suggest I think one would need to consider the actual levels of wages which in major conurbations is below the living wage. If employers offered higher wages on your logic then more people would not be attracted to benefits.

I think Chris Skidmore is onto something. I do not like his idea personally and I doubt it will ever become policy but what could happen instead is what the IPPR suggested by having a ‘wage protection scheme’ whereby you put in contributions whilst in work and then you get 70% of your former salary once you lose your job, capped at £200 per week,for six months and then you repay it through an income-contingent loan at a zero-real rate of interest once your in work. That seems fair to me.

I would also propose that employers, who have any employees on tax credits, should pay back at least 50%, after all, unemployment benefit is paid by the taxpayer and so are tax credits.

20. Man on Clapham Omnibus

13. Redfish

Nice idea but this thread is about crucifying the poor even before they get a wage.

The dream of the Tories and all those eager marketforces groupies is to outsource all public services to the private sector. And the ultimate public service (with a big juicy budget) is unemployment benefit. And this idea goes one better – turn benefits into loans and you could turn the unemployed into revenue streams for the private sector! Yeah, instead of signing on for a bit of dole, you’d become the property of Serco, or Cap Gemini, or G4S, and they’d call it something like Workloan. Man, we really are fastforwarding into a nightmarish Blade Runner future (without the cool clothes and replicants)(although I wonder about IDS sometimes).

22. margin4error

Richard

He is likely to end up with evidence though – not because of the curve – but because the government cut the top rate within the time that people could defer payement – so they did. Which means many never actually paid the 50% because the government encouraged them to wait a year and pay the 45%.

This means the pay less – it means the government can attack labour over a policy that was made to fail by a tory/lib dem government – and it means the idiots who bang on and on about the magical ‘less is more’ curve will finally have an example to use – which those who don’t know enough about might be tricked into believing is thus true.

23. margin4error

btw – back on topic…

Blame the poor, the young, and the foreigner – and won’t go far wrong in politics.

This policy blames the young and the poor.

So who does Skidmore think will administer these loans? Wonga? Loans, yeah, what a great idea. Let’s saddle the poor and jobless with more debt. Sadistic bullies the lot of them.

The unemployed should all be made to be flogged everyday by armies of Daily Mail readers and be lined up along a wall and have raw sewage thrown at them by the HARD WORKING decent law abiding taxpayers!

“The unemployed should all be made to be flogged everyday by armies of Daily Mail readers and be lined up along a wall and have raw sewage thrown at them by the HARD WORKING decent law abiding taxpayers!”

Why didn’t Keynes think of that?

This is mindless stupidity completely devoid of even basic economics and lacking any awareness of the real problems in the UK labour market. When people say we have an unemployment problem what they should really say is we have a youth unemployment problem because that is where the real problem lies. See the chart on page 2 for unemployment by age group.

http://www.civitas.org.uk/economy/Labourmarketfactsheet.pdf

Young people may have befuddled brains through too much self abuse or eating too many pot noddles but they are not that stupid. The money they would have to pay back increases their effective tax rate when they move into employment. I thought Tories believed raising income taxes discourage work. If he was suggesting lowering or abolishing employers NI contributions for the under 25s he would be onto to something. Unfortunately this kite flying is just playing to the gallery by appearing to be tough and effectively making things worse.

The wider problem is with the whole idea of NI itself. It is a grand deliberate deception at the heart of the UK taxation system. There is no insurance and there is no fund that people are paying into. The whole idea that people are paying NI like a savings scheme that they will later be able to draw on was a deliberate lie promoted by the founders. When we hear people complaining about immigrants receiving benefits, they are alluding to the deception when they say I have paid into the system for X amount of years and they have not. Mr Skidmore’s idea is just reinforcing the deception that NI is just like a savings scheme.

Different people from various points of view can disagree on fair or efficient levels of taxation. However, taxation should be honest, transparent and equitable. It certainly should not be based on deception. NI is taxation and should be merged with income tax as The Mirrlees Review suggested.

@ Richard W

The whole idea that people are paying NI like a savings scheme that they will later be able to draw on was a deliberate lie promoted by the founders.

Indeed.

The only difference between the contributors to NI and the contributors to the schemes of Charles Ponzi is that the the latter had the luxury of choice.

For an assessment of the respective fiscal merits of social security schemes financed by pay-as-you-go versus fully funded, try this by Martin Feldstein and Jeffrey Liebman, both of Harvard: Social Security: http://www.hks.harvard.edu/jeffreyliebman/ch32.pdf

The illuminating aspect in today’s news about the choice of Mark Carney to be the new Governor of the Bank of England on Sir Mervyn King’s retirement next July is that Carney is not an advocate of the “light touch regulation” school of central banking.

As Governor of the Bank of Canada he practised proactive, interventionist central banking with regulation of financial markets to keep toxic assets out of the national banking system and rein back high risk lending and borrowing. He is so respected by other central bankers that he was made chairman of the Basel-based Financial Stability Board, an international body that monitors and makes recommendations about the global financial system.

Deregulators can only weep and gnash their teeth – Carney evidently doesn’t believe that bankers are best left to do what they believe to be the profitable thing to do.

Recap: in an interview on the BBC Today programme on 4 November 2011, Bob Diamond – late CEO of Barclays Bank – said that the Banks must accept responsibility for what went wrong. In the interview – which I listened to – he repeatedly said that banks must work towards a situation where banks could fail without taxpayer support and without causing systemic instability.

So much for the notion that unemployment is the fault of the unemployed.

Spare a thought… this guy is my MP.

CG @ 5:
Agreed!!

I simply cannot see how taxing the low-paid – a full-timer on the NMW earns c.£13000 gross – and then recycling money to them (via the state, in the form of benefits and tax credits) makes any sense. All it does is create non-jobs in the public sector, which increase the taxes the poor have to pay.

Personally, I’d happily — very happily! — pay more tax to raise the tax threshold to £15K; and I accept that I would have to pay more in reduced allowances, etc. The effect on the poor (including pensioners, who ideally should not be subject to tax above (say) £30k) would be significant.

GO @ 6:

“Raising the personal allowance for everyone (or nearly everyone) is an appallingly inefficient way to reduce the net tax burden on the poor. For every £1 by which this policy reduces the net tax burden on low- to middle-income households, the government loses an additional £2 in revenue from middle- to high-income households”

Interesting: like all statists (of left and right), you are more interested in the tax-take than in the poor.

RW @ 26:

“The wider problem is with the whole idea of NI itself. It is a grand deliberate deception at the heart of the UK taxation system. There is no insurance and there is no fund that people are paying into. The whole idea that people are paying NI like a savings scheme that they will later be able to draw on was a deliberate lie promoted by the founders.”

Well said, RW! And those who promoted the lie were…? The Labour Party! With some help from the Liberals (as they now aren’t)…

31

And there are some of us who believe that NI in the UK was the brainchild of Asquith and Lloyd George.

I have an alternative idea: all MPs expense claims be repaid to the treasury after they leave office for fat directorship salaries as a thank you for placing the interests of 1% above the 99%. At least that would bring transparency to the abuse of democracy we already know exists.

35. alan b clark

NEXT THING THEY WILL HAVE US CHAINED UP, IN A CHAIN GANG.PEOPLE WAKE UP AND SMELL THE COFFEE, REBEL NOW. REMEMBER ” BRAVEHEART ” GET OFF YOUR KNEES, THE LION SLEEPS NO MORE..

@ TONE

“Interesting: like all statists (of left and right), you are more interested in the tax-take than in the poor.”

I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but as of right now there’s a £125bn gap between tax receipts and public spending. So yes, I am interested in the tax take. And in spending levels. And in distinguishing between more and less cost-effective ways of achieving any given policy objective (e.g. reducing the net tax burden on the poor). That’s not ‘statism’, it’s sanity.

As to whether I’m *more* interested in the tax take than in the poor: the mark of someone who took that attitude, surely, would be that they were inclined to pursue tax policies without regard to their impact on the poor (e.g. raising VAT in order to fund income tax cuts for mid- to high-earners).

@ TONE

“I simply cannot see how taxing the low-paid – a full-timer on the NMW earns c.£13000 gross – and then recycling money to them (via the state, in the form of benefits and tax credits) makes any sense.”

The trouble is, you need a system that works for people on £13,000 *and* people on £6,500 *and* people on £26,000.

If you want to reduce the net tax burden on the poor, raising the personal allowance is a neat way of doing that *for people on £13,000*. But it has no impact on people on £6,500, and has the unintended consequence of also reducing the tax burden on people on £26,000 (and £39,000, and £52,000…).

You could address that second issue by increasing the basic rate of tax and/or withdrawing the personal allowance above a certain income level, but you’d still be left with the poorest people – those in low-paid part-time work, those scraping by on the state pension, etc. – facing a net tax burden as high as it ever was.

The tax credits system lets you be precise about the amount by which you reduce the net tax burden on particular people, including people who pay little or no income tax. As such it means you don’t waste money on (very substantial) tax cuts for high earners, only to find the tax burden is still too high on the poorest people.

At a cost of c. £24bn a year, the tax credits system has succeeded in reducing the net tax burden on millions of low-income households by thousands of pounds a year. For a similar cost, raising the personal allowance from £6,500 (where it started a couple of years ago) to £12,000 would reduce the net tax burden on those same households by a few hundred pounds or less.

To put it anecdotally: the introduction of tax credits saw my own family’s net tax burden fall by around £4,000 a year. (We were on a low income at the time, and were effectively lifted out of both income tax and NI.) If Labour had chosen to spend the same amount of money on raising the tax threshold by £5,000, the reduction would have been no more than £1,000. Why? Because the other £3,000 would have gone to higher-income families.

“A slight variation to this is being paid not in relation to the work you do.Examples include being a CEO/Banker/Hedge Fund manager where remuneration is not based on the laws of supply and demand but who you know or the vagaries of markets which accentuate the wealth of the rich.”

Bollocks, as usual from this infested site.

Is there anyone on here who actually has some experience of either working in a jobs/benefits center or spending some time in one signing on and looking for work?
My view of things might be a bit skewed because I’ve been going to the job centre in a poor area of Leeds, but the idea that you could really make a difference to long term unemployed this way seems like wishful thinking, as there seem to be so many long term unemployed about. The low paid, low skilled available jobs are too unatractive, and are taken up disproportionately by migrants, leaving the white underclass to stew in their ‘Shameless’ life styles.

40. milo madacky

Or better still: use unemployed instead of foxes for hunting.
I bet it would delight their chaps and sponsors..

On changes in the numbers of long-term unemployed as announced by the ONS in November:

– 1.17 million people had been unemployed for up to six months, down 12,000 from April to June,
– 452,000 people had been unemployed for between six and twelve months, down 49,000 from
April to June,
– 894,000 people had been unemployed for over one year, up 12,000 from April to June, and
– 443,000 people had been unemployed for over two years, up 21,000 from April to June.
Source: Labour Market Statistics November 2012
http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/dcp171778_284362.pdf

42. wrecked_angel

For those few who are staying on benefits on purpose surely this would only convince them to stay that way. That can’t be what they are aiming for.
For those many who are desperately trying to keep their heads above water, often going into debt when it was unexpected, this would make it harder to get back on their feet. More unpaid debt is not a good outcome.
For those leaving higher education,they already have student debt around their neck, with how few jobs there are, the repayments will be crippling once they find something.

Getting started in adulthood is hard enough already, don’t go down this path.

@Bob B I’m afraid you can’t trust the office of national statistics on the job figures, the DWP counts those on the work programme and other initiatives where someone isn’t actually in employment as ‘not unemployed’. There’s a wee bit of massaging of the figures going on these days, as usual.

Cylux

I was focused @40 on the announced increase in the numbers of those who had been unemployed for at least a year. I fully agree that we need to disentangle the numbers who have been employed part-time but who want to work full-time, given the opportunity.

What is at least partly accounting for the announced increase in the numbers employed is the (unsustainable) fall in labour productivity – some employers are hanging on to or recruiting workers for fear of losing or being unable to hire scarce skills for when the economy moves into a period of sustained growth in demand for goods and services.

Try this in Monday’s FT:

Jobs boom reshapes UK labour market

Professionals, technicians and managers are leading a jobs boom that is defying economic gravity and reshaping Britain’s labour market, Financial Times research has found.
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/c2be53e4-3415-11e2-9ae7-00144feabdc0.html#axzz2DQqV64C0

This is one credible reason why London’s economy and employment are doing relatively well, as compared with most other regions, and why London house prices are continuing to rise while drifting down in other regions:

Schools failing two million children but London success is ‘unparalleled’
http://www.standard.co.uk/news/education/schools-failing-two-million-children-but-london-success-is-unparalleled-8360165.html

Recap: about 40pc of London residents were born abroad.

44

Surely it flies in the face of facts to quote poor education as the reason why London’s house prices are rising. With record numbers of graduates unemployed or employed in quite low skilled jobs. There are other factors to consider with regard the success of the capital, which just also happens to be one of the financial centres of the globe.

44. Bob B

” This is one credible reason why London’s economy and employment are doing relatively well, as compared with most other regions, and why London house prices are continuing to rise while drifting down in other regions: ”

I don’t know where you are getting your figures from but London has the second highest rate of unemployment in the UK, and the second lowest employment rate. The latter does not always correlate with the former.
http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/dcp171778_265035.pdf

The London of good jobs paying high salaries is not the same thing as the experience for many Londoners. Many of the jobs are filled by people who do not actually live in London but commute from elsewhere. Therefore, you can have many parts of the London economy doing well and at the same time high unemployment for the actual people who live in London.

48. Nexus6replicant

Why don’t they just call it PAYDAY LOANS?

Richard W: “I don’t know where you are getting your figures from but London has the second highest rate of unemployment in the UK, and the second lowest employment rate.”

Regional unemployment rates are not the only measure of economic buoyancy or prospects. Try:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/datablog/2012/apr/12/london-gdp-economy-data

“Tourists in London for the 2012 Olympic Games may have helped lift the British economy out of recession, after official data showed that they spent almost double the amount of other visitors.” [Telegraph October 2012]

“The credit crunch led to house prices falling in most places, as mortgages became harder to find. But the picture is different in London, where a growing population, relatively robust economy and limited space for new homes have driven house prices ever upwards.” [London Evening Standard 27 November 2012]

Yes Bob, I know ” regional unemployment rates are not the only measure of economic buoyancy or prospects “, but you specifically said London employment was doing relatively well. When in fact, the employment level is the second lowest in the UK. Commuters from outwith London are doing well but not so much the people who live there.

Richard W

The resident population of Metropolitan London is over 12 million, the largest metropolitan area in the EU. Scotland’s total population is only 5.2 million. Doubtless there are weak patches in London’s economy but according to the ONS, in October the Claimant Count unemployment rate in London was 4.4pc, as compared with 5.1pc for Scotland and 4.7pc for England. By the Labour Force Survey, London’s unemployment rate was 8.7pc, as compared with 8.1pc for Scotland and 7.8pc for England. See Tables 18(1) and 18(2) in Labour Market Statistics, November 2012
http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/dcp171778_284362.pdf

The direction of movement of average regional house prices is an illuminating indicator of relative regional economic buoyancy. The continuing rise of London prices – as compared with the downward drift elsewhere – is the cause of increasing social problems in London which aren’t being addressed.

Er, excuse me for being stupid, but don’t they begin paying back when in work throughh taxes and national insurance? So are they expected to pay it back twice? Utter nonsense!

Richard W

On jobs growth and regional economic buoyancy, try this recent report in the FT:

Eastern England and London have shown the fastest rate of job creation, according to the FT’s analysis, while northwest England, Scotland and the east Midlands have had the slowest.
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/c2be53e4-3415-11e2-9ae7-00144feabdc0.html

55. TIGERDARWIN

@ Freeman-Of course what we should really see happen is the personal income tax allowance go to 12k a year

Actually this is a myth, the benefit cuts to those
earning such amounts vastly outweigh any gain in tax

The real gainers in this are high income earners as they also collect the tax break and don’t lose benefits .
If they are beneficiaries of the 5 % rich tax cut they are real winners

Such is Toryland


Reactions: Twitter, blogs
  1. Neil Schofield

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  2. Jon

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  3. James Smith

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  4. Aaron Smithies

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  5. Stephen Bloomer

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  6. Political Animal

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  7. Dale Smith

    Arsehole. RT @libcon Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan http://t.co/G9ZRVxNl

  8. Sunny Hundal

    Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan for youths http://t.co/4FzA33fu

  9. Christian Guthier

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  10. Paul Bernal

    MT “@sunny_hundal Tory MP wants youth unemployment benefits to become loans… http://t.co/Ow9orhW0” Student loans for the University of Life?

  11. Mark Silver

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  12. James Holloway

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  13. Mark

    Arsehole. RT @libcon Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan http://t.co/G9ZRVxNl

  14. linnet1968

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  15. Esther Nagle

    oh for God's sake, isn't being young and unemployed when there are no jobs bad enough? http://t.co/vH2A3rAp

  16. Noxi

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  17. Peter Elliott

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  18. @GrannyWils

    oh for God's sake, isn't being young and unemployed when there are no jobs bad enough? http://t.co/vH2A3rAp

  19. Lisa Desde

    MT “@sunny_hundal Tory MP wants youth unemployment benefits to become loans… http://t.co/Ow9orhW0” Student loans for the University of Life?

  20. Anne Booth

    oh for God's sake, isn't being young and unemployed when there are no jobs bad enough? http://t.co/vH2A3rAp

  21. Fiona

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  22. Andy

    Makes me furious! "@sunny_hundal: Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan for youths http://t.co/kZC4OhLP&quot;

  23. Ste P.

    Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan for youths http://t.co/4FzA33fu

  24. Dave Tilley

    I'd like Chris Skidmore MP's salary to be a repayable loan. http://t.co/GXDxivqe

  25. christine clifford

    I thought the benefit was a loan (tax) repaid“@libcon: Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan http://t.co/YR9bQzyD”

  26. Genevieve Flight

    Fascinating ideas Eh? http://t.co/U1ng7izr

  27. K Badlan

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  28. Mark McCormack

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  29. Alan Bedford

    "@libcon: Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan http://t.co/N2ys5pT8&quot; BarmyOnStilts!? #bbcnews #skynews

  30. Marcus Boyce

    Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan for youths http://t.co/4FzA33fu

  31. John O'Shea

    RT @sunny_hundal Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan for youths http://t.co/pVX6zz3X

  32. Caroline Pleb Molloy

    I'd like Chris Skidmore MP's salary to be a repayable loan. http://t.co/GXDxivqe

  33. Lanie Ingram

    Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan for youths http://t.co/4FzA33fu

  34. The Moor

    RT @sunny_hundal Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan for youths http://t.co/YUge8yX2

  35. Pauline

    Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan for youths http://t.co/4FzA33fu

  36. Lindsay Murch

    Makes me furious! "@sunny_hundal: Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan for youths http://t.co/kZC4OhLP&quot;

  37. Jason Brickley

    Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan http://t.co/rJw7BeZv

  38. Karen

    Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan for youths http://t.co/4FzA33fu

  39. dyannesty

    RT @sunny_hundal Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan for youths http://t.co/pVX6zz3X

  40. Dominic Linley

    Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan for youths http://t.co/4FzA33fu

  41. Nick Marland

    Grrr. RT @sunny_hundal: Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan for youths http://t.co/OfSzv7mu

  42. Jeni Parsons

    RT @sunny_hundal Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan for youths http://t.co/pVX6zz3X

  43. Gods & Monsters

    Cunts are still running the world RT @sunny_hundal ToryMP wants unemployment benefit to become repayable loan for young http://t.co/THJP73MG

  44. Rev. Paul Farnhill

    Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan http://t.co/6J1tlOZA < they just get worse #NoConfidenceVoteNow #GetThemOut

  45. Robert Cook

    I'd like Chris Skidmore MP's salary to be a repayable loan. http://t.co/GXDxivqe

  46. MADD Suspicions

    Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan http://t.co/6J1tlOZA < they just get worse #NoConfidenceVoteNow #GetThemOut

  47. d1s.0bey

    Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan for youths http://t.co/4FzA33fu

  48. Ben Mathis

    I'd like Chris Skidmore MP's salary to be a repayable loan. http://t.co/GXDxivqe

  49. Alex Shattock

    um. what? i wish politicians of this kind would stay on the other side of the ocean. http://t.co/VclUzpyL

  50. Jeni Parsons

    "@libcon: Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan http://t.co/oRTPdqHM&quot; these bastard Tories need to be stopped.

  51. Robert Cook

    http://t.co/AaL7lnAC …. and charge them for the ink they use when they sign on…..

  52. Jeni Parsons

    Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan http://t.co/6J1tlOZA < they just get worse #NoConfidenceVoteNow #GetThemOut

  53. cutchswife

    Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan http://t.co/6J1tlOZA < they just get worse #NoConfidenceVoteNow #GetThemOut

  54. Owen Blacker

    Makes me furious! "@sunny_hundal: Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan for youths http://t.co/kZC4OhLP&quot;

  55. leftlinks

    Liberal Conspiracy – Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan http://t.co/MkMtCi3X

  56. Luke Martell

    Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan http://t.co/Bkhv6fyw

  57. Ian wingrove

    Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan for youths http://t.co/4FzA33fu

  58. Lucas E. Burgess

    More Tory genius- http://t.co/fo6YCW2U

  59. Nick H.

    “@sunny_hundal: Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan for youths http://t.co/oAPBXfzY” Tories are cracked. #madness

  60. What You Can Get Away With (Nick Barlow's blog) » Blog Archive » Could you fake an MP?

    [...] Michael Fabricant batting his eyes enticingly at UKIP, and then there’s this as well: (via) For individuals aged under 25 who have not yet paid National Insurance contributions for a certain [...]

  61. Eric M. Fink

    Bad idea I expect to hear soon from GOP. RT @libcon: Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan http://t.co/sV5zBJ2I

  62. UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS GOING AWAY : Dr. Pinna

    [...] Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan [...]

  63. Paul flint

    Tory MP: unemployment benefits should be a loan | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/tPbq4CQe via @libcon

  64. linda green

    Tory MP: unemployment benefits should be a loan | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/MXSe0d89 via @libcon

  65. Anne Joynes

    Tory MP: unemployment benefits should be a loan | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/pH6zrCGC via @libcon

  66. Joe Solo

    Be afraid, be VERY afraid. http://t.co/xk8bIYbB

  67. Zishaan Mirza

    "@shantel121: Opposite of "warm and fuzzy"/Tory MP: unemployment benefits should be a loan http://t.co/S35VDkBn < Tory ignorance at its best

  68. Lillian Low

    Well this is horrible: http://t.co/nH5gG45g

  69. steve

    Well this is horrible: http://t.co/nH5gG45g

  70. Robert Ferguson

    Tory MP: unemployment benefits should be a loan | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/CuksL6PF via @libcon

  71. Public University

    Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan http://t.co/rCfkXtAN

  72. Liam

    Labour will presumably now come out in support of an oh-so-progressive post-benefits tax instead ~ http://t.co/5I51i9OC

  73. Bunny Matthews

    Tory MP: unemployment benefits should be a loan | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/6eTflQus via @libcon

  74. Hazel Lewry

    Tory MP: unemployment benefits should be a loan | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/TkV1alht via @libcon

  75. Paul Clarkson

    Tory MP: unemployment benefits should be a loan | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/TkV1alht via @libcon

  76. jay

    Tory MP: unemployment benefits should be a loan | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/TkV1alht via @libcon

  77. CareerToolboxUK

    Tory MP: unemployment benefits should be a loan http://t.co/7gVDaOoK @CareerToolboxUK

  78. Tory MP: unemployment benefits should be a loan ~ Liberal Conspiracy « Stop Making Sense

    [...] by Sunny Hundal @ Liberal Conspiracy [...]

  79. TRUTHEXPOSED12

    Tory MP: unemployment benefits should be a loan

    Chris Skidmore, MP for Kingswood, and a member of the Free… http://t.co/w55nnYLw

  80. Tandy & Ruth

    Tory wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan http://t.co/Xx2ravas #nosuprise #screwtheyoung

  81. StokeBloke1972

    Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan http://t.co/6J1tlOZA < they just get worse #NoConfidenceVoteNow #GetThemOut

  82. Smiling_Carcass

    Tory MP: unemployment benefits should be a loan | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/6JjtY4na via @libcon

  83. Smiling_Carcass

    Er, excuse me for being stupid, but don’t they begin paying back when in work throughh taxes and national… http://t.co/r0GXPhkY

  84. Matthew Reeve

    Tory MP: unemployment benefits should be a loan | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/6Sbtqcm3 via @libcon

  85. Ian Betteridge

    Tory MP says unemployment benefits should be loans http://t.co/MqbQoLrU

  86. Mark Earls

    Tory MP says unemployment benefits should be loans http://t.co/MqbQoLrU

  87. Take The Power Back | adam

    [...] from the Workfare scheme for not a lot of results. An equally batshit idea comes from a Tory MP, who proposes under-25s paying back any unemployment benefit once they are back in work. Yeah, on minimum wage that’s going to work, isn’t [...]

  88. Wendy MacKenzie

    Dear God in Heaven! What will they dream up next?? http://t.co/hhrwdvLP

  89. John Hurr

    Tory MP: unemployment benefits should be a loan | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/aXCcK99f via @libcon

  90. Zoroaster

    RT @libcon: Tory MP: unemployment benefits should be a loan http://t.co/823ejLLP

  91. Socio Imagination

    Tory MP wants unemployment benefits to become a repayable loan http://t.co/PLkqpW3g

  92. pat neary

    RT @libcon: Tory MP: unemployment benefits should be a loan http://t.co/TgsoOv6e

  93. James Evans

    Tory MP: unemployment benefits should be a loan http://t.co/Hs55gssz via: @libcon

  94. James Evans

    Tory MP: unemployment benefits should be a loan http://t.co/Hs55gssz (via @libcon)





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