The case for spoiling your ballot for the Police Commissioner elections


2:01 pm - November 13th 2012

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by David Hodd

No one wants this election. The only discussion around the upcoming Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) elections is how low the turnout will be.

The Electoral Reform Society expects 18.5%. Calls from them for better publicity about the elections and candidates and for spring elections have been ignored.

But now prominent figures are coming out against this £135M scheme. Former Met Police Commissioner, Ian Blair has said, “I actually hope people don’t vote because that is the only way we are going to stop this.”

But we can give a more active and stronger message on November 15th – and that is one we can write ourselves on the ballot. I believe turnout in this election will be the lowest ever and there is a realistic prospect of spoilt ballot papers being a significant proportion of the votes.

A populist role replaces a system that worked
The concept of an elected police commissioner is flawed, and the public know it. Liberty found only 15% of people would “trust an elected Police and Crime Commissioner more than the present system to protect their family from crime”.

Another YouGov poll found that just one in five people felt the role would help in the fight against crime. Just one in ten people think PCC’s should have a party affiliation. Yet only party candidates have the resources to cover a constituency the size of several shires.

We should be strengthening the role of local authorities and improve their accountability, instead we have eroded another area of their work to try and represent our collective interests – the Big Society undermined by this government once more.

Ian Blair believes democratic accountability in policing would work at the town or city level, but not a whole force, and the role of the crime panel will be ineffective.

The election is flawed
To those on the left, there is another problem. Only die-hard voters and those for whom law and order is a touchstone issue will turn out on a dreary – and likely wet – November day. A few might have seen a leaflet – there is no mail drop as is normal in nationwide elections.

Fewer still will have been inspired by candidates who knocked on their doors in the dark We have a recipe for under-representation of left / liberal views in particular, and for adequate representation of the community’s centre-ground in general. A vote for a Labour or an independent left candidate, is less likely to be successful.

Boycott or Spoil the Ballot?
Home Office minister Jeremy Brown reckons a turnout of 20% would “not be good”. But a boycott is merely a signal for indifference. Far more potent is the spoilt paper. These have to be individually examined by the candidates or agents on the night, to confirm they are to be counted as spoilt.

A large number of these will seriously weaken their mandate. The result will be Zombie Police and Crime Commissioners and yet another Cameron policy in crisis.

So unless you live in Northamptonshire where the Corby by-election will raise the turnout, don’t put a cross, just write your message on the ballot as clearly as you can. Mine will be “I want police authorities back, not PCC’s”.

And get your friends to Spoil the Ballot too. Together we can make a difference!

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Reader comments


1. Kevin Leonard

I have written about this here http://ktarcus.hubpages.com/hub/Police-Crime-Commissioner-UK
And I have voted and recommend all to write “NONE OF THE ABOVE” on their ballot

The reason Nick Griffin is MEP for my area is nonsense like this.

I’ll be voting Labour because a) it might not be good to have them, but PCs will have significant powers whch should remain in sensible hands; b) the Labour candidate’s fairly sensible; c)the Tory candidate’s a bit of a knob-end whose campaign tweets betray a lack of understanding of the limits to the power of a Commissioner’ c) because UKIP need to allowed nowhere near domestic electoral politics.

When they report the turnout, will they include spoiled papers though? As in if the turnout is 20% but half were spoiled, will they say the actual turnout was 10%?

4. Chaise Guevara

Wot Planeshift sez.

The CON here that people have not yet realized is that the way in which the Tories have cleverly run this, even though it will appear a mess, is that we will end up with ALL Tory backed Police Commissioners totally under the influence of Downing Street.

Why else has there been a lack of information including in written form.

You will probably find that the Tories have quietly been out and targeted KNOWN Tory supporters ONLY and left everyone else in the dark hoping that only Tory supporters will have enough information to go out and vote.

This entire Police Commissioner election has been run in a very strange way with a complete lack of information.

Well, we live in Northamptonshire and we won’t be voting. We don’t have a clue why, what or who we’re supposed to be voting for.

3 & 4: Quite, although if half the votes cast were spoiled the news certainly would report that – but I doubt they will come to more than 1%.

I do want to take issue with this though “Only die-hard voters and those for whom law and order is a touchstone issue will turn out on a dreary …”

Many of those who vote this time will likely be postal voters who may make up perhaps half of those who vote (we’ll see the exact number) these are people who are more than averagely politically engaged but not necessarily “die hard”.

More concerning is that only the “law and order” types vote and the others deliberately boycott or spoil their ballot papers then we shouldn’t be surprised if the elected candidates are on the right.

It would be good to see progressive, liberal, left candidates who take a more thoughtful approach to crime and policing use these elections to provoke a real debate on these issues and, hopefully, get elected. I find the idea of abstaining from the discussion because the structure of the election is flawed a bit disturbing to be honest.

I hope good people will go out and vote and that the least worst candidates fail to get elected.

“No one wants this election” is probably an overstatement.

Why not let people vote who want to vote? How undemocratic is your attitude?

And since when did police need a “strong mandate”? They have sticks and prisons.

9. Chaise Guevara

@ Andreas Moser

“Why not let people vote who want to vote? How undemocratic is your attitude?”

You can be democratic without slavish devotion to direct democracy by referendum on every issue. We don’t vote directly on 99% of policy decisions. What makes this different? As far as I can tell, this is a terrible position to be elected directly, as it creates a scary conflict of interests.

Also, it’s not exactly “democracy” to choose from a list of people you’ve never heard of.

“And since when did police need a “strong mandate”? They have sticks and prisons.”

So much for policing by consent. Hope you don’t vote on Thursday.

From my understanding the Commissioners won’t have that much power. The responsibility to ensure that policy as set by government is followed, but with scrutiny from what remains effectively the old police authorities. It’s a new layer of burocracy and a chance for more Boris types to grandstand.

Every copper I know has thrown away their polling cards. I have too, I want to see a low turnout, not spoilt papers.

These have to be individually examined by the candidates or agents on the night, to confirm they are to be counted as spoilt.

Spoilt papers are generally disregarded with no one paying any attention to whatever may be written on them.
They are only examined if the vote is very close, when agents might argue that your scribble actually forms a cross for their candidate.
You might get a chance of having your comments read if you write your comments over the line separating two candidates.
Blair made it illegal for a candidate to Parliamentary elections to stand as ‘None of the above’.
Fraud on a large scale is not to be discounted – all Parties have form.
Go the the Polling Station take your voting slip and leave, write your comments on it and send it to your M.P. – he/she won’t give a toss but you’ll feel better.

“It’s a new layer of burocracy and a chance for more Boris types to grandstand”

It’s a nice retirement job for an MP who needs to vacate a safe seat and still pick up a nice salary.

A low turnout is a near certainty and there is a decent chance that a labour majority government would get rid of the positions. However, we would still have several years with PCCs before that and it is still best to keep the nut-cases getting the job.

@3. Planeshift: “When they report the turnout, will they include spoiled papers though?”

In UK elections, spoiled papers are always counted and always reported separately. When the result is declared, it contains the number of papers issued (first), the number of votes for each candidate (in alphabetical order) and the number of invalid papers (usually read out, and obligatory in the legal docs).

The number of spoiled or otherwise invalid papers (eg missing the issuers’ mark) is rarely covered in the press. Exceptions are when the result is very close or when there are lots of them. Observers would notice if there were 100 intentionally spoiled papers at a count and it would be a major talking point.

Spoiling a paper is more difficult than it sounds because the election officers will look for “intention”. If you write a clear cross in the appropriate box for one candidate and the description “tosser” next to the name of another, your vote will be counted.

I am unclear whether all of the candidates in my area deserve the description “tosser” but with however many hours to go before polling, I don’t think any of them has convinced me to vote for a Police Commissioner.

G4S has lost its right to operate Her Majesty’s Prison Wolds, which will now revert to public ownership. Private prisons, indeed! What next, private police? G4S is funding a candidate in every area at the elections for Police and Crime Commissioners.

Vote for the candidate to whom you think that the police would ever tell anything, anyway. You might not have one. But we do have one here in Durham. Ron Hogg.

The problem with election boycotts is that the unspoilt ballots still get counted. No one in polling stations keeps a record of *how* you spoil your ballot either aand I have yet to see the “101 Wittiest Spoilt Election Ballots of the Year” published.

I agree that this whole election looks like a farce, it seems specifically designed to provide cushy retirement jobs to Tories with no other prospects by playing to the hang ‘em and flog ‘em brigade. It might even backfire and give us something even worse.

I’m just not going to do the former types the favour or risk the latter so I will be voting.

A large number of these will seriously weaken their mandate. The result will be Zombie Police and Crime Commissioners and yet another Cameron policy in crisis.

No. It just means that the winner is elected on a shit turnout – just as already happens in local, general and by-elections (and a fair few Mayoral referenda/contests, e.g. Stoke-on-Trent).

That said, there’s nothing wrong in choosing to spoil one’s own ballot paper (I’ve done it myself), but the amount required would need to do very well in the overall result to make a point, otherwise it’ll be ignored beyond the Returning Officer’s declaration.

I shall vote, because too many made too great a sacrifice for me not to.

But as Kevin Leonard says, I will write in “None of the above”.

@15. David Lindsay: “G4S has lost its right to operate Her Majesty’s Prison Wolds, which will now revert to public ownership. Private prisons, indeed!”

For once, David, I note your valid point. Government is tolerated to use exceptional power — policing, imprisonment, tax collection, immigration control, welfare administration etc. They all use exceptional power which we tolerate (to varying degrees) from government and which should not be handed to a private organisation in a liberal society.

In Thursday’s election, I don’t know what it is about. I don’t understand what the power relationship between constabulary and commissioner will be. What can a commissioner *stop* and *start*?

@18. The Judge: “I shall vote, because too many made too great a sacrifice for me not to.”

But, your hon, isn’t that a narrow interpretation of their sacrifices? Free elections are emblematic of a liberal democratic community, but insufficient as a qualification. Perhaps they fought for the right for me to say “nyaa blegh” to the candidates; should I need to go to the polling station and write “nyaa blegh” on the ballot paper to express my discontent?

I would not accuse government of trying to subvert liberal democracy with these elections. Government is just acting daft, posturing like a teenage boy in front of his girlfriend. Contrary to the Sex Pistols lyrics, they half-know what they want and have no idea how to get it.

@3 Planeshift (and others)

“When they report the turnout, will they include spoiled papers though? ”

– it normal in elections to report the number of spoiled papers. And every candidate – or at least their agent, has to be shown the papers (or at least the uncertain ones) to confirm that they agree they have been spoilt. As an example, here are the London Mayor elections results, which show 40,000 spoilt 1st preference, and 44,000 spoilt at the second preference.

http://www.londonelects.org.uk/download/file/fid/512

Hopefully, the low turnout, and the high proportion of spoilt papers will mean that the press finally report on this part of a returning officers return.

The fact that the govt has decided to hold these elections in November only makes me suspicious they want some little tub thumper in jackboots running the police.

This is going to be a massive politicisation of the police. Which is what this govt wants. It follows the usual tory strategy. I call it the “creating little Northern Ireland’s” all over the public sector. In essence you shut down existing democratic bodies and replace them with ring fenced ‘fake democratic bodies.’ The minority opt themselves out of democratic control and become a majority in a fixed system.

This is a usual tory fix to insure tory doctrine is rammed down peoples throats. Many local councils have no overall control. This insures tory control of police. And I’m sure the usual Newspapers will cheer on the tory puppets. And if any one steps out the daily mail, sun line they will be removed.

Once again The moronic lib dems have no idea what they have given away. Morons.

@21. David Hodd: “As an example, here are the London Mayor elections results, which show 40,000 spoilt 1st preference, and 44,000 spoilt at the second preference.”

Look at the spoiled papers qualification more carefully. It is categorised in five ways. Of 40,210 spoiled papers(!) from 2.21 million, 153 were knowingly spoiled and the polling officers issued 25 bad papers.

21,833 voted for more than one candidate, so did not understand the electoral system or did not care. 5,494 papers were uncertain; they were not evaluated because Johnson had clearly won and those votes could not determine the result.

The intentionally spoiled ballot paper challenge has a small target to beat. Assuming a 20% turnout in Birmingham, a pub snug bar occupancy could win it.

What Ben says, I’ve family who work at the council and help out with the counts, the general procedure is for spoilt ballots to go in the discarded pile rather than for any thoughtful message written upon them to reach the sensitive eyes of those up for election. It’s not called the Westminster bubble for nowt you know.

If you wish to register your ire I suggest trying to pick out who would be the worst possible candidate to be a commissioner and vote for them. You’ll either elect a complete pain in the arse for the police to have to deal with on a daily basis, or someone whose incendiary polices will help speed on the revolution.

@24. Cylux: “…the general procedure is for spoilt ballots to go in the discarded pile rather than for any thoughtful message written upon them to reach the sensitive eyes of those up for election.”

I’ve attended a few counts. It was not unusual for the returning officer to show a candidate a paper with the word CUNT (usually in capitals) next to his name and ask for an opinion about validity. Sometimes more time was spent looking at insults than the genuinely questionable papers (eg cross that covers the paper but which has its centre in one box).

Charlieman @25:

“It was not unusual for the returning officer to show a candidate a paper with the word CUNT (usually in capitals) next to his name and ask for an opinion about validity.”

Did any of them say, “Yes, that’s me”?

@25 It might just be my district then.

28. Chaise Guevara

If enough people ticked the box but wrote CUNT next to it, would he have to be addressed thus in the House of Commons?

” the “101 Wittiest Spoilt Election Ballots of the Year” published”

In a devolved election, I saw a paper with ‘end abortion now’ written. The response of the election agent was ‘but that isn’t even a devolved matter…’

@25 Charlieman

My link to the Mayor election result was only to illustrate that spoilt ballot papers get counted, not to emphasise how near the spoilt paper is to electoral victory. Your experience at election counts is similar to mine.

For the London Mayor elections, we did not have a situation where 70% of the electorate could not name a candidate, the election was not on a cold November day when the sun will have set 6 hours before polls close, and there was no publicity like mailshots about the election candidates.

The key point is that the deliberately spoilt paper is a democratic expression, and unlike Ian Blair’s call for the elections to be boycott, the clearest democratic expression we can give.

There is more than one snug bar in the West Midlands, and if enough snug bar occupants go for the “Jedi Knight” option, then we can give the government and their latest flawed project the bloody nose they deserve.

31. Chaise Guevara

@ 29 Planeshift

“In a devolved election, I saw a paper with ‘end abortion now’ written. The response of the election agent was ‘but that isn’t even a devolved matter…’”

“End evolution now” would have been even better, on two counts.

Cylux (@24):

If you wish to register your ire I suggest trying to pick out who would be the worst possible candidate to be a commissioner and vote for them. You’ll either elect a complete pain in the arse for the police to have to deal with on a daily basis, or someone whose incendiary polices will help speed on the revolution.

Really? It didn’t work in Doncaster, where they’re now stuck with an English Democrat mayor. I’m not sure having someone like that will ‘help speed on the revolution’; it’s more likely that they’ll give the order to ’round up the usual suspects’ instead.

I have a friend standing in my area, but won’t be voting for him.

On a point of etiquette, what should I tell him if he asks how I voted?

Former Met Police Commissioner, Ian Blair has said, “I actually hope people don’t vote because that is the only way we are going to stop this.”

This is the single best reason for voting in these elections that I’ve seen anywhere.

@33. Jack C: “I have a friend standing in my area, but won’t be voting for him.

On a point of etiquette, what should I tell him if he asks how I voted?”

I’d just point him to your previous post…

Jack C @33:

You could try the trick my mother pulled:

One election, she was coming out of the polling station when she was accosted by a distant cousin who was manning (personing) a table outside on behalf of the local Labour Party.

“Which way did you vote?”, asked the cousin.

My mother, being a bit of a gamester in any case, and being annoyed well beyond that by the impertinence of the question, replied, “Well, I couldn’t make up my mind, so I voted for all of them!”

@14. Charlieman

“Spoiling a paper is more difficult than it sounds because the election officers will look for “intention”. If you write a clear cross in the appropriate box for one candidate and the description “tosser” next to the name of another, your vote will be counted.”

Actually, it depends on the Deputy Acting Returning Officer, who has a great deal of discretion. There is (or was) a pamphlet showing sample acceptable and unacceptable votes, but outside that, discretion is applied. I was Lib Dem Agent for the firsat Euro elections after the merger with the SDP and one vote—by a very well drawn smiley face—was disallowed, despite all the Agents being prepared to accept it (the result was not close, so it wouldn’t have made a difference).

Spoiled papers are alkways counted and declared, the problem is the media generally ignores this part (though you can work it out) unless the number is huge.

In general the obvious spoiled papers (None of the above, I hate them all equally) don’t even get shown to the Party Agents, unless the election is razor close: all they see are the genuinely doubtful (e.g. cross partly outside the box), unless there’s a genuinely funny one in which case the Deputy Acting Returning Officer might let them see it for a bit of light relief.

@37. MarkAustin: “Actually, it depends on the Deputy Acting Returning Officer, who has a great deal of discretion.”

Worthwhile points from Mark and ditto from David Hodd.

I looked at the PDF of advice for acting officers a couple of years ago when a similar topic about spoiled papers was discussed. The advice paper is very well written and encourages returning officers to include ballot papers where intent is clear, even if the paper has been marked with more than a cross or 1, 2, 3. Like you, I’ve seen election agent manuals from more than one party but in some ways they are irrelevant; the official document is clear but allows for discretion.

39. Churm Rincewind

Local democracy – who needs it?

Devolution of power to the community – can’t have that.

Poor candidates – well that’s a good excuse for not voting.

For anything. Ever.

@39 That’s the spirit!

We’ve started a little campaign against this… bit last minute, but feel free to join in.

http://www.facebook.com/events/264103017046490/

Look at these links and you will see that PCC are a waste of time

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/police/police-crime-commissioners/public/what-is-pcc/role/

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/police/police-crime-commissioners/public/accountability/

Think of this if you get a Labour PCC but you get a Tory Police and crime panel 2/3 of the Police and crime panel can then block any thing the PCC want to do so we do not get a say on how our police force answers to the people

We are looking at a system were The only PCC that will be able to do any thing are those who have a Police and crime panel on there side

We are only putting another person on our tax bills who can be tide up by the back door of the government of the day who can not deliver what the people want

SO THE ONLY VOTE SHOULD BE NONE OF THE ABOVE

Local democracy has been loudly proclaimed but in fact the Localism Act has been so undermined it is dead in the water. Given what an awful hodge-podge of back-of-a-fag-packet ideas it contained that’s no bad thing.

I’m hoping for a poor turnout so that the government will never be able to criticise another trades union ballot on similar grounds.

How much is Nick Herbert’s vanity project costing, including this ballot?

44. Chaise Guevara

@ 39 Churm

“Local democracy – who needs it?

Devolution of power to the community – can’t have that.

Poor candidates – well that’s a good excuse for not voting.

For anything. Ever.”

It would help if you presented an argument rather than snark.

Come on everybody, its really important you get out there and spoil your vote. We really need to give Cameron, Osborne and May a message.

Speaking of which, if people would like to post here what they actually wrote on their paper, I am sure it will make interesting reading, and might encourage others to ensure their non-vote is counted.

Sunset 4.15pm. Close of polling stations 10pm

45 – This is like a public service announcement from 1831. Voters – know your limits!

“What do we want?”
“We don’t know, and don’t ask us!”

47. Chaise Guevara

@ 46 Tim J

The issues are that

a) Some of us think that elected police officials are a bad idea.
b) Some of us think that these elections have been handled in a very dodgy way.

I’m not sure how we could express that view within the framework of the election other than by not voting or by spoiling ballots.

Spoiling your vote won’t make PCCs go away. It might possibly mean that when the current lot end their terms, or some time before that but after the next General Election, a new government might abolish them. Ironically, the best chance of this happening is to ensure that you vote for the craziest or laziest candidate you can find and hope that this is not the Labour one. Whatever their rhetoric, I don’t believe that an incoming Labour government would consider abolishing PCCs to be a priority were the majority of PCCs to be Labour ones…

http://botzarelli.wordpress.com/2012/11/15/the-police-and-crime-commissioner-poison-pill/

I shall vote, because too many made too great a sacrifice for me not to.

Name even one person who sacrificed so much as a wedgie or a purple nurple for your right to vote for a police commissioner.

Whatever their rhetoric, I don’t believe that an incoming Labour government would consider abolishing PCCs to be a priority were the majority of PCCs to be Labour ones…

The last Labour government were right-wing populists who introduced ASBOs for people wearing gloves in public or being naked in their own homes so I wouldn’t expect them to abolish PCCs any time this century.

51. Chaise Guevara

@ 50 Shatterface

“ASBOs for people wearing gloves in public”

If you’re talking about the one in Wikipedia, the gloves were apparently gang signs, so at least there’s some logic there. Don’t know about the nudity one (I think it would qualify as indecent exposure to be naked in your own home were you visible from the street, ASBOs or none).

As I understand it, the problem with ASBOs is not so much that they sometimes get handed out for silly things, but (as I understand it) they circumvent presumed innocence: you can get an ASBO on someone’s say-so, then get jailed for breaking the terms of the ASBO, when the original act was something you have not been convicted of, and may not have even been illegal.

Although some of those handed out do seem ridiculous, vindictive, or both: there was that woman essentially banned from having sex in her own home because she was too loud, which frankly seems like a human rights violation to me.

Well I’ve voted, and “properly”.

The fact is, Commissioners are here for the time-being, and you have to make the best of it.

I must admit to only voting once though.

I did indeed spoil my ballot.

I wrote ‘This election cost 75 million pounds. I will not legitimise this wasteful, farcical absurdity by voting for a candidate.’

My friend drew a cock and balls. I like to think we balanced each other out.

54. Chaise Guevara

..My housemate just came through the door looking cheerful and saying “I’ve never spoiled a ballot before!”

Is the PCC election legal?
The ballor paper imlplies it is obligatory to vote for 1st and 2nd choice candidates – by stipulating this without offering the option of only placing a 1st choice ‘X’.

This is misleading voters into thinking 2 votes are compulsory (implication being that to vote otherwise will void your vote).

This may contravene election law?

56. Churm Rincewind

@ 44 Chaise Guevara: “It would help if you presented an argument rather than snark.”

Well I will spell it out. I think that local democracy, and the devolution of power are, by and large, good things. (This is the basis on which, for example, I would oppose many of Michael Gove’s education reforms.)

As a result, I’m in favour of the principle of elected Police Commissioners.

I accept that the process may be imperfect, and that no individual candidate may be ideal from my own, or indeed any individual voter’s, point of view. But this is true of any election, and in my opinion is not an adequate reason for disengaging from the democratic process.

The more people who disengage, the more likely that the system will be corrupted by factional activists or hijacked by the powers that be. I think that’s a bad thing.

That’s about the sum of it. The snark was a boojum, you see.

57. Chaise Guevara

@ 56 Churm

I do share your concern that low turnout and spoilt ballots could lead to nutters getting in.

My main problem with this is that I think directly elected police positions set up a frightening conflict of interest. I worry about what people will be tempted to do at election time. Say someone’s been taking a drubbing in the press recently due to an unsolved murder – would they try to clinch a victory by stitching up some poor loner (softly and suddenly vanished away, as it were, in the midst of the words he was trying to say)?

Not that I think it’s gonna turn everyone into a cold-hearted politico. I’m sure most if not all of the commissioners we get would be horrified at the idea of doing such a thing. But the potential worries me. It might be worth looking into cases like this in the US; I believe they’ve had elected police chiefs for awhile.

Whilst figures are few and far between so far, here are some spoilt ballot results:

Wiltshire 3% of the ballots were spoilt (2500). Turnout 16.8%

No spoilt ballots at the polling booth in Newport, Gwent, which returned a completely empty ballot box – making Private Eye’s cartoon on election turnout a little optimistic

The average figures for turnout are looking to be a tad under 15%, which is unprecedented on an essentially national election.

With an electorate of 36 million, and the PCC’s having a reported cost of £75M, then this election has cost £14 for every vote cast.

…and now an enquiry from the electoral commission has been launched, even before the counts are finished. It will be important that they also review the quantity of spoilt ballots/

http://www.electoralcommission.org.uk/news-and-media/news-releases/electoral-commission-media-centre/news-releases-campaigns/low-turnout-at-the-police-and-crime-commissioner-elections


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  14. Distraction

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  15. Police Commissioner elections - Geek Ergo Sum

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  16. Distraction

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  17. Alf

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  18. Mark Wilson

    @couldbecalmer Spoiling the ballot is an option I might take: http://t.co/FQdkwhDO

  19. Stephen Budden

    The case for spoiling your ballot for the Police Commissioner elections | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/3WuAB5bh via @libcon

  20. Jon Spooner

    an argument for spoiling your vote in today's PCC elections http://t.co/fQhswyh8 – anyone want to counter?

  21. Jon Spooner

    @SteveDearden option to spoli yr vote http://t.co/fQhswyh8

  22. Alistair Gentry

    an argument for spoiling your vote in today's PCC elections http://t.co/fQhswyh8 – anyone want to counter?

  23. Jeremy Gooch

    To spoil… http://t.co/bLnjTMUq #pcc

  24. Rachel Leigh Adams

    Why you should spoil your ballot paper, not that many people seem to be aware of the voting going on today… http://t.co/yzgeCWti

  25. Police Commissioner elections | Geek Ergo Sum

    [...] The case for spoiling your ballot for the Police Commissioner elections [...]





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