My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the Green Party


11:20 am - August 3rd 2012

by Natalie Bennett    


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Britain’s three largest parties offer voters slight variations on the financial liberalisation, privatisation, trash-the-planet hyper-capitalism that has left 19th-century levels of inequality on a fast-heating Earth with degraded soils and water.

The Green Party offers a radical alternative vision, yet since 2010 have not been making the electoral progress we could be.

If I’m elected leader my focus for the next two years will be to make the Green Party a truly national party – to focus on getting other people elected, rather than being elected myself.

It’s important we elect a leader who knows what they’re going to do once elected, and how. To explain my vision, I’m launching my Plan for Leadership: My First 100 Days (PDF). It sets out the concrete steps I’d take to work with others to improve the party and consolidate our successes so far.

To start big: There’s a real possibility of trebling the number of seats we hold in Brussels, from two to six, in 2014. That won’t happen by wishing, or saying “1.3% isn’t much of a swing”. We must be strategic, make sure all parts of the party are working towards the same goal, and that our limited resources are being directed to best effect.

The European target dovetails with two further goals.

First, rapidly increasing the number of council seats we hold. The “West Midlands model” – which in two years has seen us go from three seats on three councils to 13 on seven in the region – offers a framework, I’d ensure it is accessible to all parties and regions.

Secondly, we need to identify our “next generation” of parliamentary seats. We don’t want to remain a “one-seat” party, yet we don’t have a plan for national growth.

I’d introduce “leader’s breakfasts” – monthly meetings where speakers from inside and outside the Green Party discuss a critical topic. By building relationships with influential organisations, and drawing on their expertise, we will enhance our political processes and position, as well as help members make useful contacts.

The plan also lays out what I won’t do. There’ve been suggestions during the campaign that we borrow large sums of cash from commercial lenders to “invest” in election campaigns. But that’s not the same as borrowing to install solar panels. The returns aren’t guaranteed. I would never take the risk of bankrupting the party. Our reserves are limited; we don’t have assets to fall back on.

Fundraising can be done better, but the cash won’t simply flow in by improving the nuts-and-bolts of our appeals. What inspires donors, trade unions and businesses, individuals rich and poor, are exciting political ideas and the prospects of political advances. Clever videos or snazzy graphics aren’t enough.

I ask Green Party members look at the plan (and at my website) and share their thoughts with me. We have a lot to do, we can do it – and everyone has something to contribute.

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About the author
Natalie Bennett is leader of the Green Party of England and Wales
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Reader comments


Excellent piece. I happen to be supporting Peter Cranie’s bid but it’s good to know we have strength in depth.
Regardless of the outcome I’m sure once the new leader is elected all the candidates will be pitching in to put measures like these into action

I’m not a member, but I’d like to make a suggestion. I think your focus should be on building the party in England.

Scotland and Wales already have proportional elements in the electoral system, and political cultures more favourable to green policies (Wales’ 5p carrier bag levy for example). I don’t necessarily see how Green’s taking votes from Welsh labour (by now a clearly distinct political entity) or Plaid Cymru – which had the effect of letting a tory in in South Wales central – really advanced the green movement.

Your best bet is to focus on England – where labour are still essentially a gutless party afraid of it’s own shadow and no realistic left wing alternative now exist. you can then use succesful policies introduced in Wales and Scotland as examples of green policies in practice, and you can also start to position yourselves as a principled party that can replace the lib dems as a home for protest votes, and make yourselves the choice for anti-tory tactical votes in areas where labour are dead (like the lib dems did) .

The green party has many great policies and they have come a long way! Having said that, they still have a long way yet to go.

Their ideological aversion to nuclear energy is naive and dangerous. We desperately need to wean ourselves off fossil fuels and relying solely on renewables will prolong that struggle and lead to the release of far more CO2 into the atmosphere than we can afford. Nuclear energy is not a long term solution, but it is a stepping stone in the right direction.

The objection to GM crops is also disheartening. I applaud the fact that the green party no longer oppose GM research. Having said that, I feel they should do more to speak out against groups such as http://taketheflourback.org/ (http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2012/may/01/anti-gm-activists-wheat-rothamsted?CMP=twt_gu) whose actions are an embarrassment to most other worthwhile green causes.

Clearly, I disagree with Natalie about almost everything.

However, as I’ve said before I think she’s the best candidate you’ve got. Quite apart from anything else she will be able to raise the Party’s profile in the press.

And one little claim to fame, one I shall luxuriate in:

“But there are a lot of Sky viewers, and
a lot of airspace for Sky News to fill. I used to regularly
appear on their blogging show,”

And guess who recommended her? Quite: I was asked and living, as I do, in Portugal, could not do it. The next obvious question from Sky “Could you recommend anyone?” “Well, that Natalie Bennett…..” and thus a star was born.

5. Spencer Fitz-Gibbon

Re comms/messaging: the subjects Natalie singles out here would, in my view, reinforce the damaging ‘environmental’ stereotype that holds the Greens back.

We gained a major increase in vote-share in the 2009 Euro-elections by leading on jobs and the economy. We gained our first MP in 2010 by deliberately targeting a broader working-class audience, with a costed manifesto leading on issues like jobs, pensions and protecting the NHS.

I feel really strongly that we Greens need to connect with millions more people – and we can do it! – but not if our leader makes no mention of job-creation, opposing cuts, the Green anti-austerity agenda or protecting public services. I think this would be a fundamental mistake.

That’s why (although I have had the honour of working with Natalie and can personally vouch for her many skills) I think the next leader of the Green Party really needs to be someone who’s passionate about connecting with that broader audience.

With no disrespect to other candidates, my first thought when I heard Caroline was stepping down (after the initial shock!) was: Peter Cranie.

“I don’t necessarily see how Green’s [sic] taking votes from Welsh labour (by now a clearly distinct political entity) or Plaid Cymru – which had the effect of letting a tory in in South Wales central – really advanced the green movement.”

This is a very tired argument. It makes it sound as though those votes are Welsh Labour’s or Plaid’s by rights and it supposes that everyone who votes Green would turn out and vote for other candidates in the absence of a Green.

If we want to build a healthy democracy then every seat, every vote has to be contested. I’d never as any candidate from any other party to stand aside for a Green – and I don’t have any truck with those who think Greens should stand aside for other parties.

That goes doubly for other parties who oppose a properly proportionate voting system PR (ie AV won’t do) and those who practice the sort of tribal politics that simply turns many citizens away from the democratic process entirely.

Thanks for the advice. Cheque’s in the post.

My main problem with the Green Party is not their politics. It is that their supporters, at least at my local level, are (politically) staggeringly stupid. I cannot see how anything of political worth can come from an organisation supported by Tarot card readers and ‘Pagans’.

Tim: I can indeed confirm that you were the person who set me on the path of the Sky News blogging show. Thanks!

Spencer: I think if you or anyone else interested look at my election video (http://youtu.be/uU7j-zGiGms ) you’d agree that I talk a great deal about job creation, opposing the cuts, imposing financial regulation etc).

But I think simply saying we’re anti-austerity, without painting a picture of the better life we want to create for people, with a relocalised economy – manufacturing, farming and services, cleaner air and safer roads (both very much equality issues), shorter working hours and benefits sufficient for a decent life, within the framework of the world’s existing resources (which is not an optional extra – we must cut carbon emissions, protect our soil and water etc) we’re just sounding like a slightly nicer Labour Party – when we in fact have a radically different vision of the future Britain.

9. Darren Nelson

I think a lot of Green policies overlap with left wing socialist policies.I’d be asking for support of unions (as the greens have already done) but I’d be looking to create an anti-capitalist alliance,with marxists,socialist workers party in northern towns and left wing Labour and Liberal.Plus the occupy and wikleaks supporters against the 1% and millionaires who misrepresent the UK populace in the houses of parliament.I’d take a clear step away from hereditary power and back republicanism.Many on the left will value Green expertise on enviromental issues,and in return greens should look at becoming less isolated and share ideas with all left wing groups.I very much doubt that the Greens alone can make a breakthrough big enough to change fundemental policies,but allowing a loose grouping with other like-minded progressives might just give the traditional 3 parties something to worry about.

10. Charlieman

@7. Natalie Bennett: “…when we in fact have a radically different vision of the future Britain.”

Tell the sceptics about that vision, as well as selling it to Green Party members. What is your “radically different vision”?

11. Chaise Guevara

@ 7 Pinkie

“My main problem with the Green Party is not their politics. It is that their supporters, at least at my local level, are (politically) staggeringly stupid. I cannot see how anything of political worth can come from an organisation supported by Tarot card readers and ‘Pagans’.”

All parties have idiots in their voter bases. The Greens sweep up the sort of people you describe because they’re, well, green. And possibly because so-called Pagans are FAR too cool to vote for a mainstream party.

But surely what matters about a party isn’t the image of their most embarrassing supporters, but what they actually believe in. And the Greens recently took a firm step away from New Age bullshit and towards evidence-based policy by scrapping its support for alternative medicine.

Charlieman: The radically different Green vision – we need to invest in our economy, in energy conservation and renewable energy, in public services and public transport, and in building and refurbishing homes. We need to create jobs for reasons of the economy, but also to ensure people can get on with their lives with a sense of security about the future environmentally and socially.

We understand we need to relocalise farming, manufacturing, services – to improve and stabilise our communities, provide jobs and be ready for the low-carbon world. And that means a different business model – instead of giant multinational corporations, a blend of co-operatives, small businesses and independent traders.

And we must greatly reduce the political influence of the financial industries (e.g. abolish the Corporation of the City of London, a policy I’ve championed – http://www.camdennewjournal.com/it%E2%80%99s-high-time-democratise-%E2%80%98-city%E2%80%99) is clear. We need to massively restructure them as tools for the “real” economy, rather than being gambling dens that threaten international stability.

We also believe in the need to end our long working hours culture – which has given us lots of “stuff” but left us with extremely high levels of mental ill health and stress, and the unhappiest children in the developed world, and move towards a more balanced, healthier society.

I don’t want to write an essay but the Green vision also includes getting rid of the UK’s nuclear weapons, challenging military interventions, holding the police to account and tuition fees….

The problem for the greens is that their goal appears to be to split the anti Tory vote into still further fragments, none of which seems capable of coalescing into a critical mass. It seem like the Left are all struggling to chase around for their own share of the thirty per cent of the Left Wing vote. However, the Greens are unable to attract Right/Centre Right groups in anything the figures they would need to be in a position to actually implement anything. I agree that being ‘morally’ right is important , but a swing of even two percent from Labour at the next election will see everything you believe in sustain more destruction.

Winning a seat like Brighton was fantastic, but the nature of FPTP elections mean you are gambling with everyone’s future. I enjoy the fact that greens can win a seat in the UK Parliament, but there is little point in challenging for third or second place if the Tories storm to power on a split vote.

I would really stick to local elections and the odd (in both senses of the word) constituency where you do not really split the vote against the Tories. Of course the Scottish Parliament has a different electoral system and without the threat of a Tory win by default.

@13

Be fair, New Labour, or Newer Labour can hardly be considered left wing parties can they?

Given the fact that the feckless LD’s appear to have committed electoral seppuku, there is a large wodge of former LD voters looking for a home. On the assumption that most of these are likely former SDP types from the left of the LD’s, some will naturally have gravitated to Labour as either the “least worst” option, or in the belief they are their only choice. Others will simply feel a tad lost, and not vote, but a reasonable number are likely to support the Green party.

I’d certainly be tempted to vote Green, not that it will make any difference in deepest blue Sussex of course (thanks again for that LD’s…. another wasted opportunity to make a difference!).

The Greens could actually help keep the Labour party honest… which is just as well, as I wouldn’t trust them further than I could throw them.

Of course, given what might happen in Scotland over the next 2 years, Newer Labour might not be able to rely on MP’s from north of the border by 2015, which is something I’m sure they must be privately factoring in to their calculations, even if they would never admit to it in public!

@Galen

Once again the old canard comes up about the loss of Labour MPs in Scotland if independence succeeds preventing a Labour government at Westminster.

It wouldnt have prevented it in 1997, nor 2001, nor 2005.

In fact, only one election since the war would have had a different outcomes if Scotland had been independent.

By the way, whoever wins the election for leader of the Green Party, will have no control over things in Scotland, as they have a separate party.

Jim (#13):

Calling for left wing unity around the Labour Party is all very well – but where does it get us? Seriously, this is the party that made PFI effectively compulsory in all major public projects, regardless of the circumstances. It’s the party that set ATOS on the disabled. They regulated the City so weakly that it seems even the US thought we were being lax.

Most of the leadership continues to view any deviation from neo-liberal orthodoxy (or anything at all that would upset the CBI) as crazy obsolete leftist heresy. Even now, they have pledged not to reverse most of the cuts.

I see no point in uniting around this organisation.

jungle: hear, hear. Exactly what I would have said. Plus Labour introduced tuition fees, began the privatisation of the NHS and a host of other government services, failed to make the minimum wage a living wage, the list could go on and on, and there’s no sign of any serious change in direction…

“failed to make the minimum wage a living wage,”

Just a technical point here. The Coalition is doing more to make the minimum wage a living page than Labour did.

For the living wage is defined as being a pre-tax wage.

If the current minimum wage did not have to pay tax and NI then post tax the minimum wage would be the same as the current suggested living wage post current taxes.

This is true to within a few pence an hour.

The way to make the minimum wage a living wage is thus to reduce the taxes paid by the poor. Which the coalition is doing by raising the personal allowance.

They’re not doing it quite enough, true, but it’s more than the last lot did.

Personally I argue that the income tax and NI bands should only start at the full year, full time minimum wage.

On the simple grounds that if this is the minimum wage then why does the Govt get any of it?

19. White Trash

Spencer Fitz-Gibbon: “the damaging ‘environmental’ stereotype that holds the Greens back”

Yes indeed, heaven forbid that the Greens should care about environmental issues …

20. Spencer Fitz-Gibbon

White Trash: that’s a very cheap comment. Greens obviously care passionately about the environment. And the public is unlikely to forget that. But the public doesn’t generally like single-issue parties, and as long as the Greens are subject to that unfair stereotype, it will hold us back. We know this from experience.

We also know from experience that to get our first MP elected we had to deliberately reach out beyond the traditional environmentalist vote. We did this by emphasising subjects like the economy, jobs, protecting the NHS. We deliberately set out to reach working class people we hadn’t reached before, with policies we already had but that they didn’t know about yet. This was logical, sensible and successful.

If we give the impression that we’re only interested in the environment we misrepresent ourselves, and we lose potential votes.

21. Spencer Fitz-Gibbon

Jungle (and Natalie): well said! As Peter Cranie has written elsewhere: “…in 1997 Britain elected a New Labour government that was, in policy terms, a Conservative government. It continued to deregulate finances, it continued Thatcherite privatisation, it forged ahead with PFI. It presided over the financial crisis. Before it was voted out of office it proposed austerity measures as the way to solve the problems caused by its own financial and economic policies. It rejected the Green New Deal. It rejected the Robin Hood Tax. It did nothing about tax avoidance and tax evasion. Labour has since then repeatedly promised to continue austerity measures if it gets re-elected. So, given that Labour is determined to pursue Tory policies, when do you expect things to get better as a result of voting Labour?”

22. White Trash

You say that Spencer, but the it often appears as though there is an entryist group within the Green Party whose aim is to turn the party into a Socialist party in green clothing, and for whom environmental problems are (secretly) only of interest as a transitional demand, a stick with which to beat “the Capitalists”.

Your assertion that our biosphere – with all the millions of other species, each as intrinsically valid as our own – which gave us existence in the first place, and continues to provide us with our entire sustenance and means of living (pace Sol) is somehow a “single issue” is, frankly, offensive.

The other sad thing is that entryist attempts to make the Green Party Left-wing will only succeed in causing the Green Party to fail in the medium to long term in the UK, because, sadly again perhaps, most Brits are small c conservative and just won’t vote for Socialism, as any unbiased examination of the electoral performance of Socialist parties here will show.

I totally agree with you that the Greens need to work much, much harder to attract working class support, but going left wing is not the way to do that.

23. White Trash

Pinkie “their supporters, at least at my local level, are (politically) staggeringly stupid”

Chaise “But surely what matters about a party isn’t the image of their most embarrassing supporters, but what they actually believe in. And the Greens recently took a firm step away from New Age bullshit and towards evidence-based policy by scrapping its support for alternative medicine.”

Right on the Newage bx Chaise, but I have to agree with Pinkie that far too many of the Green party members I’ve had dealings with come over as loons of one flavour or another, without an ounce of political nous, or even a vague understanding of what counts with Jo Average and her other half.

And yes that DOES matter.

24. Spencer Fitz-Gibbon

White Trash: you’re absolutely right in one respect – as I’ve often said myself, to call ecology (which by definition includes everything and how it interacts with everything else) a ‘single issue’ is daft.

*We* know that, and *we* know that the Green Party has never been a ‘single-issue’ party.

The problem is public perception. All the research I’m aware of has shown that the public largely perceive the Greens as ‘single issue environmentalist’ or ‘only interested in the environment’ – and they don’t interpret ‘environment’ as we do (meaning everything and how it all interconnects).

The public generally sees ‘environment’ in a separate little box alongside lots of other separate boxes. And very very few consider ‘the environment’ as the issue they consider the most important or relevant, and the issue that motivates them to vote.

The economy is consistently seen as the most important issue, by a long way. If we’re going to communicate effectively with the public we need to take their perceptions into account. We have cutting-edge economic policies, we know that millions of people who don’t yet vote Green *like* those economic policies and consider economics to be the most important thing – it just seems so obvious we should be talking to them about the things they want to talk about, if we want to connect effectively with them.

Btw I’ve been a Green Party member since 1987 and in that time have spent 7 years running the party’s national media operation (successfully, I think). I’m not an entryist – just someone who has seen what gets through to voters and what doesn’t, and I find it *so* frustrating to see us squandering chances to connect with millions of people…

Of the four candidates in this election (and I know all of them well enough to sincerely respect them), I think Peter is the one with the deepest understanding and greatest ability to do that connecting – to boldly go outside our traditional comfort zone, which we must do if we’re ever to get beyond a reliable 6% or so of the national vote (or less in a general election when we especially suffer from tactical voting).

@15 John Ruddy

I’m aware of the electoral arithmetic John, nor was I reinforcing the canard – perhaps I didn’t explain myself clearly enough. Of course it is possible that the result in 2015 could be significantly impacted in the event that there are no Scottish Labour MP’s at that point, irrespective of the past results.

The point I was trying to make was more along the lines of what the impact would be on the rumpUK political system in the event of a YES vote in 2014.

As has been seen in Scotland, a left of centre party there competing with Labour has not led to the outcome posited by Jim @13; the SNP have emerged as the majority party, something that would have seemed ridiculous only a few years ago.

@24 Spencer

It seems to me that the real challenge for the Greens in the run up to the next GE is to supplant Labour by presenting themselves as the only “real” progressive force in UK politics. Given the self destruction of the LD’s, and the continuing refusal of Miliband and his mates to show us the corpse of New Labour, there is certainly potnetial for the Greens to try and emulate the success of the SNP in Scotland (I know the two situations are not directly comparable…but even so, lessons to be learnt..?).

Whatever the shortcomings some may see with the quality or stances of Green activists, they have their equivalents in ANY party; whether they be swivel eyed right wing carpet biters within the Tories, far left Old Labourites or unresconstructed Blairites in Labour, old fashioned Liberals in the rump LD’s…. it’s not as if any of the mainstream parties are in much of a position to throw stones given the current situation.

There are plenty of disaffected left of centre, progressive voters out there who are not about to vote Labour; they are essentially homeless in a political sense since they are unlikely to vote LD. Of course, that won’t help in many constiutuencies given the FPTP system in place….. but it might help in some areas.


Reactions: Twitter, blogs
  1. Liberal Conspiracy

    My 'first 100 days' plan for the Green Party http://t.co/snJuOlbd

  2. Damian Payne

    My 'first 100 days' plan for the Green Party http://t.co/snJuOlbd

  3. sunny hundal

    Green party leader candidate @natalieben's pitch > My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the party http://t.co/gqnJCfWn

  4. natalieben

    RT @sunny_hundal: Green party leader candidate @natalieben's pitch > My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the party http://t.co/5kjv9VPe

  5. Tim Gee

    RT @sunny_hundal: Green party leader candidate @natalieben's pitch > My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the party http://t.co/5kjv9VPe

  6. Caroline Russell

    RT @sunny_hundal: Green #gpleader candidate @natalieben's pitch > My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the party http://t.co/8aihBuji > inspiring

  7. Caroline Russell

    RT @sunny_hundal: Green #gpleader candidate @natalieben's pitch > My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the party http://t.co/8aihBuji > inspiring

  8. Damian Payne

    RT @sunny_hundal: Green #gpleader candidate @natalieben's pitch > My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the party http://t.co/8aihBuji > inspiring

  9. Jason Brickley

    My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the Green Party http://t.co/FqDI2suS

  10. Charlie Kiss

    RT @sunny_hundal: Green party leader candidate @natalieben's pitch > My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the party http://t.co/5kjv9VPe

  11. leftlinks

    Liberal Conspiracy – My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the Green Party http://t.co/cq46QupU

  12. Colin-Roy Hunter

    My 'first 100 days' plan for the Green Party http://t.co/snJuOlbd

  13. Christopher Snowdon

    Another aspiring Green Party leader gives us her political strategy. http://t.co/AIbqSEbc

  14. Gods & Monsters

    Green party leader candidate @natalieben's pitch > My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the party http://t.co/gqnJCfWn

  15. Sean O' Ciardha

    RT @cjsnowdon Another aspiring Green Party leader gives us her political strategy. http://t.co/Q3ZPBz7Y the greens … http://t.co/ePmJu7MC

  16. natalieben

    MT @cathrynsymons: How @natalieben would spend her 1st 100 days as #gpleader http://t.co/s391Esn2 not taking out large loans thank goodness!

  17. natalieben

    In case you missed it earlier today: My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the Green Party – http://t.co/jeygoj3x #gpleader

  18. Michael Turner

    In case you missed it earlier today: My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the Green Party – http://t.co/jeygoj3x #gpleader

  19. Rob Jarrett

    In case you missed it earlier today: My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the Green Party – http://t.co/jeygoj3x #gpleader

  20. Oxford Kevin

    In case you missed it earlier today: My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the Green Party – http://t.co/jeygoj3x #gpleader

  21. Rachel

    MT @cathrynsymons: How @natalieben would spend her 1st 100 days as #gpleader http://t.co/s391Esn2 not taking out large loans thank goodness!

  22. The Dragon Fairy

    “@natalieben: My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the Green Party – http://t.co/t90wkEdP #gpleader” <- Must read for Green Party Ppl & watchers

  23. Kim Blake

    “@natalieben: My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the Green Party – http://t.co/t90wkEdP #gpleader” <- Must read for Green Party Ppl & watchers

  24. Caroline Russell

    “@natalieben: My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the Green Party – http://t.co/t90wkEdP #gpleader” <- Must read for Green Party Ppl & watchers

  25. Peter Pink

    My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the Green Party http://t.co/xqeb8Rui via @zite

  26. natalieben

    What's the Green's radical vision? A short answer on my Liberal Conspiracy "first 100 days" blog: http://t.co/rJeS9L4w

  27. Becky

    What's the Green's radical vision? A short answer on my Liberal Conspiracy "first 100 days" blog: http://t.co/rJeS9L4w

  28. Susanna Rustin

    What's the Green's radical vision? A short answer on my Liberal Conspiracy "first 100 days" blog: http://t.co/rJeS9L4w

  29. Ben

    What's the Green's radical vision? A short answer on my Liberal Conspiracy "first 100 days" blog: http://t.co/rJeS9L4w

  30. Jim Jepps

    Liberal Conspiracy: Natalie Bennett's "Plan for Leadership" http://t.co/FInooTIR A clear vision for the role of leader #teamnb

  31. A socialist

    Liberal Conspiracy: Natalie Bennett's "Plan for Leadership" http://t.co/FInooTIR A clear vision for the role of leader #teamnb

  32. Jim Jepps

    What's the Green's radical vision? A short answer on my Liberal Conspiracy "first 100 days" blog: http://t.co/rJeS9L4w

  33. Andrew Boswell

    Liberal Conspiracy: Natalie Bennett's "Plan for Leadership" http://t.co/YuTgdCUe A clear vision for the role of leader #teamnb #gpleader

  34. The Dragon Fairy

    “@natalieben: My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the Green Party – http://t.co/t90wkEdP” – one of the candidates for leadership of @TheGreenParty

  35. TheCreativeCrip

    What's the Green's radical vision? A short answer on my Liberal Conspiracy "first 100 days" blog: http://t.co/rJeS9L4w

  36. Green leadership election: We need to revive our campaigning spirit | Liberal Conspiracy

    […] Peter Cranie: Why the Green Party should elect me as leader Natalie Bennett: My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the Green Party […]

  37. Steve Hynd

    My ‘first 100 days’ plan for the Green Party | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/OzwU5iAX via @libcon

  38. Matty Mitford

    Here's Natalie's plan for her first 100 days as leader. Excellent stuff http://t.co/t5aPjUNL #gpleader

  39. Ross Campbell

    Here's Natalie's plan for her first 100 days as leader. Excellent stuff http://t.co/t5aPjUNL #gpleader

  40. TheCreativeCrip

    Here's Natalie's plan for her first 100 days as leader. Excellent stuff http://t.co/t5aPjUNL #gpleader

  41. Sharon Pavey

    Here's Natalie's plan for her first 100 days as leader. Excellent stuff http://t.co/t5aPjUNL #gpleader

  42. Myles Jackman

    Here's Natalie's plan for her first 100 days as leader. Excellent stuff http://t.co/t5aPjUNL #gpleader





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