That domestic violence murders are falling is a myth, and dangerous for women


10:01 am - July 21st 2012

by Ally Fogg    


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This week the official homicide statistics were released by the Office of National Statistics. In keeping with the trend of previous years, there has been another fall in the murder rate, which is great news of course.

But in breaking the news for the Guardian, home affairs editor Alan Travis picked up on one explanation, which apparently originates with the ONS head of crime stats,

John Flatley, the ONS head of crime statistics, said two-thirds of murders involved partners or former partners or other kinds of family killing.

I don’t know where this quote was taken from, it is curious that it appears to be a paraphrase rather than a direct quote (ie there are no quotation marks). But pay attention to the phrase “or other kinds of family killing.”

Give or take the havoc caused by the occasional serial killer or spree killer, trends in homicide statistics are surprisingly consistent. The details of the latest homicide statistics won’t be published until January, but unless something truly unprecedented and spectacular has occurred, I’ll assume they follow the same trend as in previous years. For the past decade at least, slightly more than two thirds of murder victims are known to their killer – they are family members, household members, friends or acquaintances, and I would presume this is the category to which John Flatley was referring.

Travis’s report was discussed on Comment is Free by the normally scrupulously dependable criminologist Professor David Wilson, who said:

If the vast majority of murders come from within the home, it’s in changes to domestic life and policy that we find the most important factors behind the fall in the murder rate. Compared to 30 years ago, domestic violence is now treated as a far more serious crime.

Meanwhile over at the Spectator, Nick Cohen goes further, praising the success of feminism for the fall in murder rates.

My old friend Alan Travis of the Guardian explains the decline by pointing out that two thirds of murders involve a (nearly always male) partner abusing his (nearly always female) partner or ex-partner. Crime has fallen because society’s attitudes to domestic violence have changed utterly.

All of this would be wonderful if true. Unfortunately it isn’t.

The number of women killed by partners or ex partners over the past decade has hovered very consistently around the 100 per year mark. In 2010/11 there were 94. Since 2001 we’ve had a high mark of 117 and a low mark of 80 (in 07/08), but the overall trend is static.

I repeat, the figures up to June 2012 have yet to be released, but the only way the overall drop of 86 homicides could be explained by a fall in the number of female DV deaths would be for the number of women killed by their partners to have fallen to very nearly zero.

The whopping great mistake in all these reports (which may or may not originate with the ONS themselves) is to include ‘friends and acquaintances’ as domestic violence casualties. They’re not.

Many of these ‘acquaintances’ may be rival drug dealers, for example. In fact, in 2010/11, the “friends and acquaintances” category was by far the largest subset of the group, accounting for 204 murders – more than twice as many as female DV victims. Every previous year shows the same pattern.

The full category also includes children killed by parents; parents (including elderly relatives) killed by their children; sibling murders; husbands killed by wives and various ‘other’ combinations. Rather than accounting for over two thirds of murders as Cohen claims, in 2010/11 only 17% of homicides were women being murdered by their partners.

The most depressing part of this is not the factual inaccuracy, but that the myth being created is actively dangerous for women. The sad truth is that domestic violence deaths are the one major category of homicide statistics that are bucking the trend on violent crime. They are not falling – they are remaining stubbornly persistent.

Domestic violence services of all sorts are facing horrific cutbacks from local and national government and drop in charitable funding. These services are needed as much today as ever. It is horrifying to think that the establishment readers of the Spectator might reassure themselves with the thought that the need for intervention is less than it was.

Nick Cohen’s celebration of feminist achievement is premature, ill-judged and does no one any favours.


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Reader comments


Perhaps an even more dangerous myth for women is the one perpetuated by popular culture (Twighlight, 50 shades of Grey) that domestic violence is OK. When did abuse become entertainment?

2. Chaise Guevara

“When did abuse become entertainment?”

Going back to Shakespeare at least. I haven’t read either of those books, but do they actually portray domestic violence as OK? If 50 Shades of Grey is about what I think it is, then it sounds like it might be more about consensual S&M, which I suppose could be called “domestic violence” as it’s violence in the domestic setting, but it’s hardly the same thing as spousal abuse, mainly because of the “consensual” bit. As for Twilight, my question would be whether domestic violence is actually portrayed as a good/uncontroversial thing.

I ask because I’ve noticed a trend of people accusing films, literature etc. of “condoning” something they actually condemn, like when someone told me that Rules of Attraction condones the lead character’s unhealthy attitude to sex when actually it presents it as a massively compromising character flaw that ruins his life. Or when fundamentalists claim that J.K. Rowling condones Voldemort’s Nazi views.

Hi folks, Ally here.

Just a slight clarification on the headline. It is a myth that domestic violence homicides are falling.

It is not necessarily a myth that domestic violence is declining across the board. Evidence from the BCS (now the CSEW) is that there has been a substantial drop over the past 15 years or so in number of incidents.

However the numbers of murders are stubbornly persistent.

4. Charlieman

We can assume that an overall decline in murder/homicide in the UK reflects changing behaviour. It may be a consequence of behavioural control — CCTV cameras, better investigation by the police — or that violent people are doing different things. Perhaps drug dealers and gangsters use different techniques to maintain social control than killing enemies.

Domestic violence, by definition, is distinct from criminal violence. Changes that affect the rate of criminal violence are not going to make a difference to the rate of domestic violence. Comparing the two is not very illuminating.

100 deaths per year by domestic violence appears to be the natural figure based on how possible victims are currently protected. Ally Fogg argues that funding cuts for organisations providing protection are misguided — and I follow the argument. But if the number of deaths is to be reduced, the solution is to do something different rather than more of the same.

5. Charlieman

@1. Nicole: “Perhaps an even more dangerous myth for women is the one perpetuated by popular culture (Twighlight, 50 shades of Grey) that domestic violence is OK. When did abuse become entertainment?”

I’ve not read _50 Shades of Grey_ because I have read a few bad reviews of it. OK, I’ve not read any review that is favourable. But I know a bit about consensual BDSM and have met many practitioners, and BDSM has nothing to do with domestic violence. Consensual BDSM really is entertainment.

The excruciating prose of Belle de Jour was presented as a knowing story about working as a call girl. It contained enough contradictions for a questioning reader to conclude that it didn’t add up. My perception of _50 Shades of Grey_ is that it too is ill-researched fantasy.

A couple of observations on the fact that homicides involving or ex-partner remain a consistant level.

First, there is no express reason why an overall fall in the prevalence of domestic violence should necessarily produce a uniform decline in the prevalence of a specific category of domestic violence. Homicides are, by definition, extreme events and one cannot, therefore, assume that they will automatically follow the general trend – to do so is to fall prey to an ecological fallacy.

Second, just because the perpetrator of a homicide is the victim’s partner or ex-partner it doesn’t automatically follow that we consider that homicide a act of domestic violence. People can and do kill their partners/ex-partners for other reasons in circumstances where there is no prior history of violence within the relationship and so, even if the number of homicides that are attributable to domestic violence does fall this will have no bearing on the figures for partners/ex-partners who are murdered for other reasons.

Third, its also worth noting that police recorded crime statistics reflect offences as they categorised by the police at the time that they are reported – every year around 2-3% of homicides that appear in record crime statistics are subsequently ‘downgraded’ after futher investigation and – usually – a coroner’s inquest determines that what the police originally thought was a homicide was actually either a suicide or an accidental death.

@Nicole

“When did abuse become entertainment?”

When did consensual sexual behaviour between adults become abuse?

@Charlieman

Yes good points. I’m all in favour of ‘doing something different.’ I’m not in favour of ‘doing less’ which is what we’re currently facing.

@Unity

Also good points. FIrst para – completely agree. Second para – yes, although from memory the great majority of partner homicides occur at the end of a pattern of DV (would need to check that though, not sure how high the proportion is) . Third para – yes, true, although unlikely to make much difference to the broad trends.

9. Richard Carey

Attitudes towards domestic violence have changed. These days the police will prosecute even if the abused partner does not want charges pressed.

As for murder, we do see cases where the victim was not given protection from threats made prior to the crime. Unfortunately, sometimes there’s little prior restraint that can be applied by the law. However, where threats are made, the perpetrator is unlikely to be properly dealt with because the criminal justice system is ineffectual.

Those of you who consider yourselves ‘progressive’ need to face up to the fact that, if you throw out as ‘reactionary’ or ‘right-wing’ the notion that people who commit crimes need to be properly punished, but instead should be ‘helped’ and ‘rehabilitated’, this approach sets at liberty a lot of dangerous men.

It will never be possible to stop these kinds of crime in a free society, but, if violent men are properly punished when convicted the first time, they will not be at liberty to commit further crimes, so a more robust, punitive justice system would be able to reduce these ‘domestic’ murders, to the extent that they are committed by people with a prior record for violent crimes.

10. Richard W

I think a lot of the changes in violent crime patterns can be explained by demography. Let us assume that males in the 20-45 cohort are more likely to be involved in violent crime than males 45-70. if the fertility rate drops and less children are born. We would expect that to start influencing the violent crime statistics twenty years later because there are less males in the cohort most likely to be involved in violent crime. Without looking up the research, I would predict that the falling birthrate from the 1970s caused violent crime ratios to fall two, three and four decades later.

“The number of women killed by partners or ex partners over the past decade has hovered very consistently around the 100 per year mark. ”

It depends what people mean by the number of women killed by partners is falling. If it is consistently around 100 per year then from your perspective it is not falling. However, they appear to look at the number as a percentage of the population. If the population is rising and women killed is roughly constant then the ratio of women killed in the whole population will be falling. However, that is misleading as you have noticed. Some of the rise in population is caused by immigration but mostly it is because the population are living longer. Therefore, the ratio can be falling through an increase in older people who tend not to be involved in violent crime.

The probability of a woman killed by a violent partner may well be rising in the at risk cohort at the same time as violent crime for the whole population is falling. Moreover, if the fall in birthrate does mean there are less people in the 20-45 group, then the probability of a woman suffering violence or death probably has risen if the number killed is approximately constant. I have no idea if males 20-45 are any more violent than any other age group. Just an assumption that I suspect the research would confirm. To draw meaningful conclusions from things like crime statistics does require a good deal of disaggregation into subsets.

Violent crime has fallen because people are less violent has a different meaning to violent crime has fallen because there are less people in the age group who commit violent crime. One would need to breakdown the crime statistics and the population into various age cohorts, then see how the numbers in that cohort compare to the past. Only then could one draw a meaningful probability of whether violent crime for that age group is rising or falling.

11. Charlieman

@6. Unity: “Third, its also worth noting that police recorded crime statistics reflect offences as they categorised by the police at the time that they are reported…”

That is a troublesome point. If the data (pedantically) are inaccurate, any analysis requires more effort.

12. Charlieman

@9. Richard Carey: “Attitudes towards domestic violence have changed. These days the police will prosecute even if the abused partner does not want charges pressed.”

My guess is that dead people are not questioned as to whether charges might arise following their demise. So what?

“Those of you who consider yourselves ‘progressive’ need to face up to the fact that, if you throw out as ‘reactionary’ or ‘right-wing’ the notion that people who commit crimes need to be properly punished, but instead should be ‘helped’ and ‘rehabilitated’, this approach sets at liberty a lot of dangerous men.”

I am not ‘progressive’ but I am a liberal; there is a difference.

I do not need to be told to face up to facts.

The thing about crime is that something that has occurred across civilisation is still not-understood.

13. Richard Carey

@ Charlieman,

“My guess is that dead people are not questioned as to whether charges might arise following their demise. So what?”

The point I made was not concerned with murder, but with incidents of domestic violence where in the past the police would say to the victim; ‘do you want to press charges?’ and now do not ask, but press charges whatever the victim’s view. That is a change of attitude, or rather MO.

“I am not ‘progressive’ but I am a liberal; there is a difference.”

Fine. If you are not ‘progressive’ then the point was not addressed to you.

14. Luis Enrique

Here’s an interesting hypothesis concerning violent crime in general

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/06/the-crime-of-lead-exposure/

@charlieman

Actually, the initial misclassification of a small percentage of deaths each year is not as problematic as it might seem as the number of instances where that occurs is relatively consistent year on year.

As Ally points out, its doesn’t affect the overall trend and so only really indicates that every year there are a small but farily consistent number of deaths that occur in rather ambiguous circumstances that lend themselves to misclassification.

As long as miscarriages of justice don’t arise from these initial false positives, its not a major problem if you deal with the data properly and only a potential source of error if, like the newspapers and politicians, you’re dumb enough to believe that inferences about trends can legitimately be drawn from a couple of data points.

16. CASSANDRA

The work of a statistician is to interpret data. You are only as good as the data you use.

BCS and police data is flawed by the methodology. Coroners court data is flawed by social mores as is BCS and police figures.

It seems there is a frictional level of domestic homicides. No amount of public policy tweeking will change this.

I suspect there are other myths. I suspect female on male violence is much greater than reported. I suspect single parents are just as ‘successful’ as ‘traditional two parent families’.

Pay me and I will give proof to one hundred degrees of freedom.

Depends on your politics and pocket.

17. Just Visiting

One form of domestic violence is provably increasing rapidly: in December the Guardian said:
‘Honour’ crimes against women in UK rising rapidly, figures show….47% rise

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2011/dec/03/honour-crimes-uk-rising

But LC seems deaf to this form of VAW.

This is the 3rd thread on VAW in the last 6 mnths on LC – in each there has been debate as to whether it is rising or not.

In each I’ve mentioned this one form of vAW that is proveably on the rapid increase – but in each case no LC commenter has chipped in!

Isn’t it time LC stopped turning a blind eye to Honour Violence?
What will it take for it to stop being a taboo here, and allow a discussion?

18. Shatterface

I think a lot of the changes in violent crime patterns can be explained by demography. Let us assume that males in the 20-45 cohort are more likely to be involved in violent crime than males 45-70. if the fertility rate drops and less children are born. We would expect that to start influencing the violent crime statistics twenty years later because there are less males in the cohort most likely to be involved in violent crime. Without looking up the research, I would predict that the falling birthrate from the 1970s caused violent crime ratios to fall two, three and four decades later.

The correct reslonse to any statistical argument including the phrase ‘let us assume’ is ‘let’s not’.

Violent crime has fallen consistantly since the late 70s so if birth rates had anything to do with it violent criminals would be starting before they are 10 years old.

Those of you who consider yourselves ‘progressive’ need to face up to the fact that, if you throw out as ‘reactionary’ or ‘right-wing’ the notion that people who commit crimes need to be properly punished, but instead should be ‘helped’ and ‘rehabilitated’, this approach sets at liberty a lot of dangerous men.

They are going to be released sooner or later so you have the choice of attempting to rehabilitate them or let the prison system brutalise them further. A brutalised ex-offender is more likely to reoffend.

Attitudes towards domestic violence have changed. These days the police will prosecute even if the abused partner does not want charges pressed.

This is simply not true.

a) It is the CPS not the police who prosecute
b) In London more than 50% of cases end in a caution
c) Approximately 50-60,000 cases of dv are prosecuted each year in England and Wales. Less than ten involve the state prosecuting against the victim’s wishes.

What has actually happened is a giant con job by the police that they take dv more seriously these days. TWhilst there are some imnprovments here and there, it is patchy, inconsistent and a tiny minority.

Nicole #1: I agree with you. Chaise, Charlieman, Unity etc – the abuse in 50 Shades isn’t to do with the BDSM sex, it’s to do with the psychological characteristics and behaviour of the male protagonist. He stalks and controls the woman, prevents her from seeing friends, etc… the book depicts an emotionally abusive relationship even if the sex is consensual. That’s the danger of it, that the book is promoting the idea of abusive behaviour as somehow romantic or sexy.

If you search ’50 Shades’ and ‘abuse’ you will find lots of articles explaining why this is the case.

21. Chaise Guevara

@ 20 Violet

Oh, ok. From that I assume the same point is being made about Twilight (based on the criticisms I’ve heard of the book). However, Nicole referred to it as “domestic violence”, so I’m not sure in what way you agreee with her. Controlling behaviour can be abusive but it’s not the same thing as violence and mislabelling it as such causes problems.

Also Nicole says this is a dangerous trend “for women” but films etc. frequently portray women treating men this way and play it for laughs. Isn’t that basically the plot of My Super Ex-Girlfriend? It was certainly the message I took from the trailer: “This guy’s ex is a superhero and she’s abusing her powers to screw with him, ha ha ha”.

22. Chaise Guevara

@ 19 Spicy

“Approximately 50-60,000 cases of dv are prosecuted each year in England and Wales. Less than ten involve the state prosecuting against the victim’s wishes.”

Really? That’s counter-intuitive and if anything moves me towards believing that police shouldn’t prosecute against the victim’s wishes. I assumed that the policy of prosecuting regardless was to prevent abusers being protected by their victims due to Stockholm syndrome or fear (and therefore laudable), but if only about 10 out of several thousand are against the victim’s wishes, doesn’t that raise the possibility that the victim honestly believes that prosecuting will make things worse for them?

23. Dan Factor

Where is there any domestic violence in Twighlight?

24. Richard W

18. Shatterface

” Violent crime has fallen consistantly since the late 70s so if birth rates had anything to do with it violent criminals would be starting before they are 10 years old. ”

Violent crime was on an upwards trajectory until it started to fall from the 1990s. http://www.usak.org.tr/istanbul/files/bcs25.pdf

This was a consistent phenomena across the western world.
See chart 3 here for violent crime in the U.S. and Canada.
http://uregina.ca/~kingha/econ236/notes/Section%2011-12%20notes%202006%20(ALL).pdf

Age of the offender is the single most robust factor for predicting violent crime. Young males reach the peak of their propensity to be involved in violent crime between the age of 20-29. This is a consistent finding across multiple research into the subject. Therefore, since these relationships are robust at the micro-level we should expect falling birth rates to impact violent crime at the macro-level a couple of decades later. A declining birth rate will change the age distribution of the population and there will be fewer males in the the 20-29 group.

This is interesting on those factors and the impact on violent crime.
http://www.internetjournalofcriminology.com/Loh%20-%20Prisoner%20and%20Demographic%20Age%20Charateristics.pdf

@ Chaise: Or it raises the possibility of the police still not carrying out adequate investigations. It you look at jurisdictions around the world that prosecute without the victim having to instigate proceedings, the proportion of victims reporting to police usually at least doubles – in some cases trebles.

26. Chaise Guevara

@ 25 spicy

Yeah, fair point.

Something I’ve never been very clear on is why killing your children is not seen as a domestic violence incidence. The violence conducted against children by their parents and other family members most certainly is domestic in nature and when they are killed it is a fairly clear cut extension of domestic violence.

It looks to me like these statistics show that the total domestic murders is falling, particularly because less kids are being killed, although the author may well be right that women killed by their males partners is not (I’ve no time to check all the figures but am happy to accept this as given unless corrected).

In that case it’s not a myth that domestic violence is falling, only that violence against women in the home is falling (if the author is correct). I’m really not comfortable with the implication that the deaths of children is somehow a less important crime to focus on than the deaths of adults.

28. Shatterface

Where is there any domestic violence in Twighlight?

It’s not there. The Twilight saga is a rather twee series of books about chaste fantasy relationships with ageless pretty-boys, and they’re aimed almost exclusively at teenage girls. If anything, they’re suffocatingly moralistic.

@Jim Jepps (27)

You make a really good point, and one I do try to bear in mind.

The phrase ‘domestic violence’ is misleading in many ways. When talking about relationship violence I prefer to use the term Intimate Partner Violence (IPV), partly because it has less baggage, and also because some violent relationships are between people who are no married or cohabiting.

As well as child abuse and infanticide, there is also the issue of elder abuse, sibling abuse and other forms of familial relationship violence, some of which may be less common, but that doesn’t mean they’re not of concern.

However when other people use the term domestic violence or DV so much and I find myself discussing what others have said, sometimes it is easier to go with the flow, but at least I try to specify what form of DV I’m referring to at any given time. Apologies if I didn’t do so quite clearly enough.

(Just as a matter of fact, though, unless you know something I don’t, it’s unlikely that the child murder rate accounts for the bulk of the overall decline. Unlikely, since it is starting from a comparatively low base (about 60 per year). My hunch is that it is mostly stranger and acquaintance murders that are falling, which would be more in keeping with the general trend of the violent crime stats)

For the purposes of national homicide data, murders occurring within the family where the victim is under 18 are not classified as ‘domestic violence’ but as ‘child murders’.

As such, any reduction or otherwise in children being killed within the family do not relate to the claims of a reduction in domestic violence murders.

Thanks both 29 and 30.

My question (which I don’t know the answer to) is whether it’s right to separate out murders in the home between adult and child – although it’s really useful to know how the stats are compiled.

I know less kids are being murdered but don’t know the breakdown so you may be right that domestic murders remain steady. When I get time I will look into this. Thanks.

@ Jim Jepps: As long as data compilers are clear about their definitions, I don’t think it matters whether children are included or not – as long as they are counted!

Of more importance is whether it matters in practice ie should violence against children be classified as domestic violence for the purposes of providing interventions? I would argue that, on balance, it is better to keep them separate since the skills required to work with child abuse are not the same as those needed to work with traumatised adults. Also the rules around confidentiality – a critical issue for most adults – are very different than those for children.

Things get a little more complex when dealing with teenagers experiencing abuse from a partner but even here, on balance, I would say that it would be difficult to incorporate under-16’s into most domestic violence services (can’t get benefits, hold a tenancy etc) but I’m open to hearing other arguments as to the benefits of inclusion.


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  23. Ally Fogg

    Re-posted on @Libcon by me: A dangerous domestic violence myth is born http://t.co/0Ufs7Gx3

  24. Nafeez Ahmed

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  31. Tina Hendry

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  32. Claire Evans

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    That domestic violence murders are falling is a myth, and dangerous for women | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/FbDp98t3 via @libcon

  46. eleanor

    That domestic violence murders are falling is a myth, and dangerous for women | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/VdMJ99HN via @libcon

  47. Soapflakes

    That domestic violence murders are falling is a myth, and dangerous for women | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/VdMJ99HN via @libcon

  48. Freedom Programme

    That domestic violence murders are falling is a myth, and dangerous for women | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/PjB3yJiD via @libcon

  49. Lea Tierney

    That domestic violence murders are falling is a myth, and dangerous for women | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/cSLsssQO via @libcon

  50. Navie Kalsi

    That domestic violence murders are falling is a myth, and dangerous for women | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/VdMJ99HN via @libcon

  51. The Astell Project

    That domestic violence murders are falling is a myth, and dangerous for women | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/FbDp98t3 via @libcon

  52. NatalieNtim

    That domestic violence murders are falling is a myth, and dangerous for women | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/ms9YQfcD via @libcon

  53. frances ryan

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  54. Julie Newman

    That domestic violence murders are falling is a myth, and dangerous for women | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/VdMJ99HN via @libcon

  55. Merseyside DVS

    That domestic violence murders are falling is a myth, and dangerous for women | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/FbDp98t3 via @libcon

  56. Ruby Red

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling, and the media should stop saying they are (by @allyfogg) http://t.co/1noxFWSQ

  57. Emma Mckay

    That domestic violence murders are falling is a myth, and dangerous for women | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/VdMJ99HN via @libcon

  58. That domestic violence murders are falling is a myth, and dangerous for women | Liberal Conspiracy | Merseyside Domestic Violence Service

    [...] This week the official homicide statistics were released by the Office of National Statistics. In ke…. [...]

  59. sunny hundal

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  60. Cat Dickson

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  61. arealpayne

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  62. Jimjam Wigwam

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  63. Martin Davies

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling, and the media should stop saying they are (by @allyfogg) http://t.co/1noxFWSQ

  64. Soapflakes

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  65. Charles Barraball

    "@frances__ryan: Domestic murders are NOT falling – and the mdia shld stop saying so @allyfogg http://t.co/GTCkFD7X (via @sunny_hundal)"

  66. Andrea

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  67. Victoria Sutton

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  68. Paul Trembath

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  69. lucy avison

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  70. Purbeck Pashmina

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  71. ????? ????

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  72. Smart Girl's Guide

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  73. Chloe Massey

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  74. spitaldyke

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  75. Julie Doughty

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  76. Thurrock Women's Aid

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  77. Shannon Harvey

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  78. Helen Jones

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  79. sianushka

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  80. andthesewalls

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  81. Jennifer C Krase

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  82. Gaby Weiner

    RT @frances__ryan: Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/PeC4jVcW

  83. Rhian

    That domestic violence murders are falling is a myth, and dangerous for women | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/VdMJ99HN via @libcon

  84. Katy Lee Harrison

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  85. DV Diary

    That domestic violence murders are falling is a myth, and dangerous for women | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/VdMJ99HN via @libcon

  86. Sue Haile

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  87. MTG SOLICITORS

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling – and the media should stop saying they are, by @allyfogg http://t.co/JdFXAbab (via @sunny_hundal)

  88. Collette Winters

    @standingtogether RT "Domestic violence murders are NOT falling, and the media should stop…. (by @allyfogg) http://t.co/LOsRyyuW"

  89. Collette Winters

    @STagainstDV RT @sundersays "Domestic violence murders are NOT falling, and the media should stop…. (by @allyfogg) http://t.co/LOsRyyuW"

  90. AVA

    Ally Fogg: That domestic violence murders are falling is a myth, and dangerous for women http://t.co/uX4uHPUX

  91. Collette Winters

    @STagainstDV sorry that RT was via "@sunny_hundal: Domestic violence murders are NOT falling… (by @allyfogg) http://t.co/LOsRyyuW"my error

  92. Sue Haile

    Despite govt initiatives, domestic violence murders aren't falling, they're remaining stubbornly persistent http://t.co/5Av34jRz via @libcon

  93. deconstructed yogi

    Domestic violence murders are NOT falling, and the media should stop saying they are (by @allyfogg) http://t.co/1noxFWSQ

  94. From The Gut

    RT @libcon That domestic violence is falling is a myth, and dangerous for women http://t.co/xzdUz7Yv << relevant to #swscmedia case study.

  95. Frank Mullane

    Guardian was wrong to imply drop in no. of homicides is due largely to less domestic violence murders of women.
    http://t.co/egH51w6k

  96. Shan Kilby

    Guardian was wrong to imply drop in no. of homicides is due largely to less domestic violence murders of women.
    http://t.co/egH51w6k

  97. Sandra Simpson

    Guardian was wrong to imply drop in no. of homicides is due largely to less domestic violence murders of women.
    http://t.co/egH51w6k

  98. Poppy Collinson

    Guardian was wrong to imply drop in no. of homicides is due largely to less domestic violence murders of women.
    http://t.co/egH51w6k

  99. Frank Mullane

    @bindelj Guardian was wrong to imply drop in no. of homicides is due largely to less domestic violence murders of women
    http://t.co/egH51w6k

  100. DV Diary

    Guardian was wrong to imply drop in no. of homicides is due largely to less domestic violence murders of women.
    http://t.co/egH51w6k

  101. Frank Mullane

    @VeraBaird Guardian was wrong to imply drop in no. of homicides largely due to less domestic violence murders of women
    http://t.co/egH51w6k

  102. seeds

    Guardian was wrong to imply drop in no. of homicides is due largely to less domestic violence murders of women.
    http://t.co/egH51w6k

  103. Frank Mullane

    No. of women killed in DV broadly same for many yrs. Domestc Homicide Reviews will yield info on services they accessd http://t.co/egH51w6k

  104. CentreForNonViolence

    That domestic violence murders are falling is a myth, and dangerous for women | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/ACBGSqpJ via @libcon

  105. Against Stalking

    @VeraBaird Guardian was wrong to imply drop in no. of homicides largely due to less domestic violence murders of women
    http://t.co/egH51w6k

  106. Against Stalking

    No. of women killed in DV broadly same for many yrs. Domestc Homicide Reviews will yield info on services they accessd http://t.co/egH51w6k

  107. Naomi Watkins

    No. of women killed in DV broadly same for many yrs. Domestc Homicide Reviews will yield info on services they accessd http://t.co/egH51w6k

  108. Shiv.Upadhyay

    No. of women killed in DV broadly same for many yrs. Domestc Homicide Reviews will yield info on services they accessd http://t.co/egH51w6k

  109. Jane Monckton Smith

    Guardian was wrong to imply drop in no. of homicides is due largely to less domestic violence murders of women.
    http://t.co/egH51w6k

  110. Leah Hardy

    @TheRealSGM This is an excellent blog post on the subject… http://t.co/0Gxx8cDM

  111. Leah Hardy

    @DeborahJaneOrr @KathViner @KiraCochrane http://t.co/0Gxx8cDM

  112. Deborah Orr

    @DeborahJaneOrr @KathViner @KiraCochrane http://t.co/0Gxx8cDM





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