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Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left


8:30 am - January 13th 2012

by Sunny Hundal    


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Over the last 18 months, ever since the Conservatives announced plans for massive cuts to benefits, disabled people have been using the internet to mobilise, campaign and raise awareness of the vulnerable state they were in.

I highlighted in Oct 2010 how the cuts would badly hurt people like Sue Marsh and possibly push her into divorce. While I fully admit we didn’t do enough to cover their concerns, I did try and stay on top of what was going on.

Along with UKuncut, they are among the few bright spots in left activism since the election and offer lessons for all of us.

Admittedly, I’m lumping together a broad range of campaigners and activists, but I think it’s valid here.

1) Identify the target
Disability campaigners were laser-like focused on the Welfare Reform Bill from the minute it was announced. They didn’t tie it into other issues or get into how it tied into everything else: their aim was to stop this bill.

Of course there were related issues: how the media demonised them as scroungers and regularly published false stories; how the Dept for Work and Pensions lied in press releases (as IDS eventually admitted); how Labour regularly fed the Conservative narrative of ‘benefit scroungers’, etc. But they mostly stuck to the main topic.

2) Cluster around a few hubs
Sue Marsh’s blog became an early rallying point, as did Kaliya Franklin’s blog. They launched Broken of Britain, Where’s the Benefit, DPAC and a range of other places where they disseminated information, posted events of protests and shared stories to inspire and help each other.

These clusters became points of information that grew the community and network of activists and served to rally them.

3) Do your research
I cannot stress this enough. They didn’t just swear at the government (as they were entitled to do) – they also made submissions to government consulations, they offered different ways for people to get involved (from signing a petition to being at an anti-ATOS rally), and they prepared detailed reports that made their case.

It cannot be stressed enough how their knowledge of the welfare system and point-by-point rebuttals of what the govt said helped them get credibility with the media. They didn’t spout mindless cliches – they made a forensic case against the Reforms. They made dozens of FOI requests that turned up newsworthy information.

4) Lobby relentlessly and carefully
When it turned out that Boris had lobbied on behalf of them – an email went around saying that any support, even from Boris, was welcome. They focused on the prize and were willing to keep strange bed-fellows for their objective.

They tried to be careful not to alienate journalists who might help them get positive coverage by attacking them (working with the Times too). They constantly lobbied blogs and other left campaigners to work with them (and were right in saying lots of people ignored welfare reform).

They didn’t give up – they were constantly lobbying in some shape or form – whether just tweeting about issues or fund-raising to get the #spartacusreport done. In their case ‘clicktivism’ helped.

As Patrick Butler at Guardian points out:

The mainstream media has now started to play catch up with the bill and its consequences, partly because of events in the Lords last night, but mainly because of the astonishing success of a network of highly motivated and creative disabled (and non-partisan) campaigners loosely coalesced under the #Spartacusreport Twitter hastag.

Disability issues have always struggled to get on the media radar. But that changed dramatically on Monday when #spartacusreport started trending on Twitter. The report itself is a hugely impressive piece of analysis which identifies the statistical flaws and evasions underpinning the government’s disability living allowance proposals. It also revealed London Mayor Boris Johnson’s hitherto unknown concerns about DLA reform.

5) Engage MPs or other organisation
Despite their sickness – both Sue Marsh and Kaliya Franklin came to the Labour party conference to speak at a fringe-event organised by Left Foot Forward.

They harassed and cajoled MPs, they got in touch with charities that could help (or just offer support) and they carefully monitored what was going on in Parliament and responded to it. Without the focus on the House of Commons and Peers – they would not have been able to throw a spanner in the works.

Looking ahead
I’m sure I must have left some stuff out and people will dispute bits – so I’m happy to get feedback. This is how I saw the campaign anyway.

This also raises another question – can we organise a group technical infrastructure which activists can easily tap into? During the campaign, activists were asking how to set up mailing lists, websites to lobby MPs, and other web-based tools that would come in handy.

We’ve created these tools before for earlier campaigns – why isn’t it possible for new campaigners to simply choose from a group of ready-made tools and quickly adapt them for a new campaign? Thoughts?

Anyway, all that aside – well done to the thousands of activists across the country who lobbied on this issue. The war isn’t over yet, and it probably never will be. But you tasted victory on Wednesday and you showed others how it could be done.

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About the author
Sunny Hundal is editor of LC. Also: on Twitter, at Pickled Politics and Guardian CIF.
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Story Filed Under: Blog ,Fight the cuts ,The Left

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Reader comments


“possibly push her into divorce”

I read her original piece. It is pretty heart-breaking, and if the government cannot find something else to cut then they should increase taxes to cover the shortfall for the deficit. This is morally wrong. But if she loses her personal entitlement to benefits (which she should not, to be clear), and her husband is heartless enough to divorce her, how can you blame that on the government? It will be his fault. The problem with Sue Marsh and the reason they aren’t getting a wider hearing is that they are over-egging their case, over-emotionalising everything, and ratcheting up the rhetoric to no discernible effect.

“, over-emotionalising everything”

When you are faced with losing your home, your family and any form of future, I think it’s fair enough to get a little emotional.

The constant nit-picking and holding people you disagree with to standards you wouldn’t dream of holding yourself is part of the deeply unpleasant nature of the attacks that have been made on people like Sue Marsh. Tell me, how long do you think you would be able to maintain a relationship with somebody if the price of doing so was having to fork out thousands (if not more) every year on their treatment when a simple divorce would make you both significantly better off financially? You’d have to be a saint.

The right has spent the past decade complaining of peverse incentives in the benefits system, arguing its main problem is the lack of incentive for work and the lack of incentive for couples to stay together. Now you support changes to a system that will gives anybody in a relationship with somebody with a disability a clear incentive to end the relationship or quit their job. Scum.

3. Alisdair Cameron

Admittedly, I’m lumping together a broad range of campaigners and activists, but I think it’s valid here.

It is, to a degree valid, but you need to ask why we have come together? It’s relatively simple, but something that seems to escape the Labour party: a common shared interest and outlook to oppose measures we see as beyond the pale for a civilised society. A shared enemy, if you like, but more importantly unifying principles and a preparedness to say, stop, enough..
That means no triangulation, no covert agreement with the Government, no finessing of policy, or pledging that you’ll take the edges off it. A realisation that this is not ivory tower theoretical policy games playing suited to a JCR and no further, but major, life-changing, indeed life-and-death issues, informed by real people in distressing straits. Then, you in hard with well-researched facts etc

These recent victories must be place din context: middle class tory voters also have disabilities and disabled children, so they will understand the benefits of…benefits. The anti welfare cuts will also hurt those who do not attract sympathy: ‘scroungers.’ as a relentless DWP assisted PR campaign has labelled them. When people are angry at the shared room rate for housing benefit (anyone under 35 must share a house) and the end of crisis loans (which used to be grants, are so hard to get and cover, yes: crises) then victory can be celebrated.

5. Rob the crip

At fault New labour, end of story.

Speaker: “if she loses her personal entitlement to benefits (which she should not, to be clear), and her husband is heartless enough to divorce her, how can you blame that on the government? It will be his fault. ”

Sue is symbolic of 700,000 disabled people expected to be hit by these cuts, several million of us if you include the pending 20% cut in DLA budget as it becomes PIP. With no realistic hope of becoming fit enough to work I’m terrified of the effects it will have on my finances, and I’m far more secure than most disabled people. Across that many people and their partners, those stresses are statistically sure to destroy some marriages, but beyond that, other people will look at their financial situations and see divorce as a way out of an impossible situation, a way to keep their children more fiscally secure, fed and warm even, even if it is at the cost of their marriage. If A’s income is not sufficient for the family to survive on, but means their partner B can’t receive benefit, then divorce is a logical fiscal choice, an act of love, and a direct result of government policy.

“they are over-egging their case, over-emotionalising everything,”

Try looking at the situation from our side. Imagine how you would feel facing being too disabled to work, facing the loss of your only benefits, and not having the income needed to keep your family together, and then seeing yourself demonised every time you opened a tabloid newspaper. The stories of disabled people killing themselves over the loss of benefits are there for all to see. Reporting this is not ‘over-egging the case’ or ‘over-emotionalising’, these are the stark facts we face, and that the rest of society is ignoring (when not claiming we’re all fakes and frauds).

You have the luxury to be able to turn your back on our reality, we do not.

7. bendyleopard

~~You have the luxury to be able to turn your back on our reality, we do not.~~

Precisely.

We are forever being told to stop exaggerating (removal of Mobility from people in care homes -we were right -Gov U turned)

We get told to *grow up* they are just wheedling out scroungers (Hmm so how do the successful appeals re ATOS figure into that then?)

People read the papers, which is more often than not just a DWP press release and think they know exactly what the Government is doing. We DO know what is going on, we research, we pour over figures, we look for the new disability descriptors…we tweet, blog and comment on them…and are told we are being emotive.

Heres emotive for you all. The new proposals for bathing say that (amongst others for mental health etc) someone is only entitled to care allowance if they cant wash their UPPER BODY. So if they cant manage to bathe their lower half they can get stuffed. Thats a fucking disgrace. Seriously in this country we are going to allow disabled people to sit in their own filth and muck if they cant reach their lower half. I am entitled to get emotive about that, arent I?

8. So Much For Subtlety

Disability campaigners were laser-like focused on the Welfare Reform Bill from the minute it was announced. They didn’t tie it into other issues or get into how it tied into everything else: their aim was to stop this bill.

So the model being held up here is a group of people demanding other people’s money for themselves, with utter disregard for everyone else and every other issue?

I am sure the last bit made them much more effective, but on the other hand, simply demanding more of someone else’s money for yourself is not going to be a winning strategy in the long run I think. This was always a hard sell for the Tories. They did not get what they wanted. But that doesn’t mean other groups will be as sympathetic to the media and the public. I am dubious about this being a model.

Not to mention what it says about the Left – which used to be a movement to make sure workers kept more of their own money but is now a movement to make sure civil servants and other clients of the State get more of the workers’ money. It is not a good look. Nor is it sustainable in the long run.

9. So Much For Subtlety

7. bendyleopard

We are forever being told to stop exaggerating (removal of Mobility from people in care homes -we were right -Gov U turned)

The government’s u-turn, like all their decisions, was a political one. Not a factual or a moral one. That they changed does not prove you were right. Just that it did not poll well with their focus groups.

We get told to *grow up* they are just wheedling out scroungers (Hmm so how do the successful appeals re ATOS figure into that then?)

They show the system works by providing people with a functioning appeals procedure. A system provided by ATOS that is successfully moving the majority of people to the right set of benefits.

If you want the welfare state to survive, it needs to police its costs. Which means finding those people not entitled and removing them from the system. Otherwise spending will grow and grow until we cannot afford it anymore. Which is roughly where we are now. So if you care about disability money, you should be helping the government improve the system and identify flaws. Not mindlessly opposing every suggestion they have.

Have you ever tried making an argument that has the remotest chance of actually getting someone who disagrees with you to change their mind SMFS or is trolling your only function?

11. Leon Wolfeson

@10 – Mason, is that a serious question? Oh come on!

@9 – Yep, you should be removed for advocating murder. Next!

12. So Much For Subtlety

10. Mason Dixon, Autistic

Have you ever tried making an argument that has the remotest chance of actually getting someone who disagrees with you to change their mind SMFS or is trolling your only function?

If there is anything remotely close to wrong in what I said, I would like to hear it. It simply is not possible for any sensible person to disagree with a word of that. Other posts, yes. But not that one.

So it is an odd time for you to make that claim. So for the record, no I don’t think that will change anyone’s mind. As everyone must agree already.

13. Leon Wolfeson

@12 – Ahh, you’re from the Ministry of Truth I see.

Explains a lot.

Lovely article Sunny, thanks

For the record, Dave IS a saint and won’t divorce me, lol. It is undeniable though that cuts that make it impossible to stay together will lead to divorce.

As for the comments of SMFS you really need to think of something realistic to use to attack us. Arguing that by opposing the welfare reform bill – the thing that affects us we are hanging everyone else out to dry just makes you look silly and a bit desperate.

15. bendyleopard

~~They show the system works by providing people with a functioning appeals procedure. A system provided by ATOS that is successfully moving the majority of people to the right set of benefits.~~

Id argue that if the system worked there wouldnt need to be so many costly appeals…

@ 7

I’m not normally a pedant who picks people up for trivial keyboard slips (do enough of my own…) but your pour over figures is a scream. Never seen that one before.

17. bendyleopard

Glad to have been of service.

SMFS, your purpose is to derail, so if say I challenged your baseless assertion that this is about ‘taking other peoples money’ then we would be having a conversation about economics and political world-views which is far away from the actual topic of what is wrong and what is right with the Welfare Reform Bill. This is the issue; supporters of the government over the welfare issue refuse to actually debate the subject and instead wish to link it to some macro-level Left VS Right, Socialist VS Capitalist, Keynes VS Friedman, frugality VS excess. We are not going to agree on those things so what is the point bringing them up? Are you just incapable of debating a single subject as is and have to ramble into non sequiters?

I have to see for example any evidence or argument demonstrating that the Welfare Reform Bill will save any money. It doesn’t matter if you want austerity or not, that is a matter that can be debated but is not. Yes, you can slash the welfare bill but there has been no account of the cost to the country as something else rises as a result of support being removed from people.

Actually, SMFS is right, the Welfare State is about taking other people’s money to pay for individuals who cannot ,through no fault of their own, earn the money to survive. Taxation tends to serve a similar purpose, most of us could not afford to pay for roads, schools and health care.
Where SMFS gets it wrong, he ignores payments such as tax credits which, in effect, subsidise employers.
I wonder how much Mr. SMFS and family have dipped into the welfare state, spending other people’s money.

20. So Much For Subtlety

14. Sue Marsh

As for the comments of SMFS you really need to think of something realistic to use to attack us. Arguing that by opposing the welfare reform bill – the thing that affects us we are hanging everyone else out to dry just makes you look silly and a bit desperate.

I am not attacking you Sue. I never have. I simply pointed out the basic flaw in Sunny holding this up as a model for other people to follow.

bendyleopard

Id argue that if the system worked there wouldnt need to be so many costly appeals…

So if they took away the appeal process the system would be better if your opinion? When you take money from people who think they have a right to it, they will be upset and will appeal. It is necessary and inevitable that we have an appeals system. Which will be used. Although only a minority of the majority of people moved off this particular form of Disability appeals. And only a minority of those win. So the system seems to be working.

Mason Dixon, Autistic

SMFS, your purpose is to derail, so if say I challenged your baseless assertion that this is about ‘taking other peoples money’ then we would be having a conversation about economics and political world-views which is far away from the actual topic of what is wrong and what is right with the Welfare Reform Bill.

I am not sure. As this thread is about the success of this model. And any model that involves one special interest group demanding other people’s money for themselves and not caring about other causes is not, in my opinion, a good model in the long run. To talk about that is not to derail the topic – it is the topic.

I have to see for example any evidence or argument demonstrating that the Welfare Reform Bill will save any money. It doesn’t matter if you want austerity or not, that is a matter that can be debated but is not. Yes, you can slash the welfare bill but there has been no account of the cost to the country as something else rises as a result of support being removed from people.

Welfare has been relentless expanding. It is too early to be sure of what the effects will be, but throwing hundreds of thousands of people off the more expensive form of welfare onto cheaper ones – and deterring other people from claiming – will almost certainly save money. If it didn’t why would you all be so upset about it?

steveb

Actually, SMFS is right, the Welfare State is about taking other people’s money to pay for individuals who cannot ,through no fault of their own, earn the money to survive. Taxation tends to serve a similar purpose, most of us could not afford to pay for roads, schools and health care.

Of course most of us could. How expensive do you think those things are? However you have made one small mistake – the Welfare State is not about taking about other people’s money to pay for individuals who cannot, through no fault of their own, earn the money to survive. It is about taking other people’s money to pay for individuals who claim they cannot, often through every fault of their own, earn the money to survive. Those claims are not always true. In many cases they are not even remotely close to true. And the damage they inflict on themselves is often, perhaps even usually, self-inflicted.

Where SMFS gets it wrong, he ignores payments such as tax credits which, in effect, subsidise employers.

It is irrelevant if it does.

I wonder how much Mr. SMFS and family have dipped into the welfare state, spending other people’s money.

Wonder away.

20
Of course it’s irrelevant when you don’t have an answer.

Wonder away
Ditto

22. bendyleopard

~~So if they took away the appeal process the system would be better if your opinion? When you take money from people who think they have a right to it, they will be upset and will appeal. It is necessary and inevitable that we have an appeals system. Which will be used. Although only a minority of the majority of people moved off this particular form of Disability appeals. And only a minority of those win. So the system seems to be working.~~

No I didnt say that. Of course there should be an appeal system. What I said was SO MANY. Atos are making mistakes, huge mistakes. They are finding people fit who are dying.

Id like to know where you are getting your figures from about only a minority are winning appeals (not true)

You are entitled to your own opinions but not your own facts.

23. bendyleopard

~~Those claims are not always true. In many cases they are not even remotely close to true. And the damage they inflict on themselves is often, perhaps even usually, self-inflicted.~~

10/10… Honestly I thought you were real, you had me fooled. Brilliant. Who did you base the character on? Its so fantastically observed. Really good, Im laughing loads here, too funny!

24. So Much For Subtlety

22. bendyleopard

No I didnt say that. Of course there should be an appeal system. What I said was SO MANY. Atos are making mistakes, huge mistakes. They are finding people fit who are dying.

The fact that a minority of people appeal doesn’t say anything about the Atos process. It is just that if you take money away from people they will get upset. Atos is not making mistakes. On the basis of what we have seen so far, the majority of people accept Atos’ decision. In fact a majority seem to drop their claims before even getting to Atos, but that may be wrong. Certainly a majority of those processed by Atos do not appeal. And a majority of those that appeal lose. That means that the people who are not doing their jobs, the people who are making huge mistakes, are the doctors and bureaucrats of the Social Services. They are passing too many fit people as sick.

Id like to know where you are getting your figures from about only a minority are winning appeals (not true)

It is true. At least all the figures I have seen say so.

You are entitled to your own opinions but not your own facts.

You and me both.

25. Leon Wolfeson

@23 – You don’t recognise it? Orwell’s Ministry of Truth.


Reactions: Twitter, blogs
  1. Liberal Conspiracy

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  2. TeresaMary

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  3. Bleam

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  4. Julian Rowley

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  5. Patron Press - #P2

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  6. Claire Wells

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  7. lifeonacurve

    Relentless Disability Campaigners are a shining example http://t.co/BvMnlWTa via @libcon

  8. per sunan

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  9. Adele Bailey

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  10. Jill Hayward

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left – http://t.co/68c6xYEG

  11. Maria Stanford

    Excellent post by @sunny_hundal Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left – http://t.co/pKgzV3x5

  12. jean cameron

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/eOJzqsTz via @libcon

  13. Michael Cronogue

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left – http://t.co/68c6xYEG

  14. Vaughan Simons

    @suey2y Seen this fantastic piece yet? @sunny_hundal: Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left – http://t.co/8804yi9I

  15. Alex Braithwaite

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/aWAzRCFf via @libcon

  16. owenblacker

    And an interesting technical question at the end RT @libcon Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left http://t.co/68AKZc0h

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    RT @sunny_hundal: Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left – http://t.co/aZXvO0uH <great post on an impressive campaign.

  21. Emma

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    Good @sunny_hundal piece on the #spartacusreport campaign http://t.co/Dz3dqtrv #disability

  32. Patrick Butler

    Good @sunny_hundal piece on the #spartacusreport campaign http://t.co/Dz3dqtrv #disability

  33. BendyGirl

    Good @sunny_hundal piece on the #spartacusreport campaign http://t.co/Dz3dqtrv #disability

  34. Margo Milne

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  35. Jayne L

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    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/Xp63j4Nu via @libcon #spartacusreport

  38. Claire OT

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/Xp63j4Nu via @libcon #spartacusreport

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    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left http://t.co/KpB9kDnt

  40. Gil Skidmore

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  42. theaandnatesmam

    Good @sunny_hundal piece on the #spartacusreport campaign http://t.co/Dz3dqtrv #disability

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    http://t.co/xAXvDEEG via @libcon #spartacusreport

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  45. Jules

    From @sunny_hundal
    http://t.co/SlNMSCP9 <<Politics of the future will be less about party allegiance+more about campaigns on specific issues

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    http://t.co/xAXvDEEG via @libcon #spartacusreport

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    Nice piece but Spartaci come in all shades, not just red. http://t.co/hmvx0pkR via @sunny_hundal : #spartacusreport #wrb

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    Nice piece but Spartaci come in all shades, not just red. http://t.co/hmvx0pkR via @sunny_hundal : #spartacusreport #wrb

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  57. Sunny Hundal Uses #SpartacusReport As An Example Of Good Campaigning « Same Difference

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    "Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left" http://t.co/MVDJW8xD Good analysis by @LibCon / @Sunny_Hundal

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    "Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left" http://t.co/MVDJW8xD Good analysis by @LibCon / @Sunny_Hundal

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    "Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left" http://t.co/MVDJW8xD Good analysis by @LibCon / @Sunny_Hundal

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    "Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left" http://t.co/MVDJW8xD Good analysis by @LibCon / @Sunny_Hundal

  62. Jay Astarte

    "Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left" http://t.co/MVDJW8xD Good analysis by @LibCon / @Sunny_Hundal

  63. Rebecca Mallowan

    “@WTBDavidG: "Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left" http://t.co/KKiGFi8h Good analysis by @LibCon / @Sunny_Hundal”

  64. Vammo

    "Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left" http://t.co/MVDJW8xD Good analysis by @LibCon / @Sunny_Hundal

  65. Chris Salter

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/xJEY78cq #ppnews

  66. TheCreativeCrip

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/xJEY78cq #ppnews

  67. Rosena McKeown

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/xJEY78cq #ppnews

  68. liane gomersall

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/kD2htk4x via @libcon #spartacusreport

  69. Helen Brown

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/xJEY78cq #ppnews

  70. Sue Marsh

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/l0Gn9RaB via @libcon #spartacusreport

  71. Nemesis Republic

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/l0Gn9RaB via @libcon #spartacusreport

  72. Kanjin Tor

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/l0Gn9RaB via @libcon #spartacusreport

  73. Rosena McKeown

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/l0Gn9RaB via @libcon #spartacusreport

  74. Helen Brown

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/l0Gn9RaB via @libcon #spartacusreport

  75. Lynda Constable

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/l0Gn9RaB via @libcon #spartacusreport

  76. Ed Miliband’s relaunch speech: was it a success or a failure? | Catch21 Productions

    […] opportunity, by refusing to take the lead in opposing them (it is disability campaigners who have taken the lead instead).  Mililband seems to be particularly bad at detecting and anticipating changes in the public […]

  77. Bev Turner

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/l0Gn9RaB via @libcon #spartacusreport

  78. Sinead O'Connor

    Deserved praise for @suey2y and @bendygirl and reasons to be cheerful for all disabled activists: http://t.co/2a3K1kUt

  79. amble skuse

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/l0Gn9RaB via @libcon #spartacusreport

  80. Stella Harding

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/xJEY78cq #ppnews

  81. B Rawsthorn

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/l0Gn9RaB via @libcon #spartacusreport

  82. Clenton Farquharson

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/9wKYcSMO via @libcon

  83. Clenton Farquharson

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left http://t.co/37kWoWW2 via @libcon

  84. Kyron Hodgetts

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/l0Gn9RaB via @libcon #spartacusreport

  85. GreatHomerGirl

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/kD2htk4x via @libcon #spartacusreport

  86. amble skuse

    @allbigideas RT @WTBDavidG: "Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left" http://t.co/XRBVqkNG Good analysis by @LibCon

  87. Citizen Kev Barretto

    Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left http://t.co/KpB9kDnt

  88. Link Loving 16.01.12 « Casper ter Kuile

    […] Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left. Sunny Hundal. […]

  89. Chris Evans

    Deserved praise for @suey2y and @bendygirl and reasons to be cheerful for all disabled activists: http://t.co/2a3K1kUt

  90. CHARISSA MALCOLM

    Deserved praise for @suey2y and @bendygirl and reasons to be cheerful for all disabled activists: http://t.co/2a3K1kUt

  91. Faith Clarke

    Deserved praise for @suey2y and @bendygirl and reasons to be cheerful for all disabled activists: http://t.co/2a3K1kUt

  92. How the Spartacus welfare cuts campaign went viral « ATOS REGISTER OF SHAME

    […] Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left (liberalconspiracy.org) […]

  93. Welfare Reform in the UK | Day in the life of a Busy Gal…

    […] Why disability campaigners are a model for the broader left (liberalconspiracy.org) […]





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