Why Labour can no longer afford to get closer to Europe


8:30 am - December 14th 2011

by Sunny Hundal    


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Whether David Cameron sold out the rest of Britain’s economic interests to save the City is an academic debate, and soon to be an irrelevant one.

The howls of anger at his decision from the left, and the business community, miss the point: this was an entirely political decision and most Britons dislike the EU enough to give him the benefit of doubt.

That means Labour’s criticisms are as futile as calls for the party to work with the Libdems and make the pro-European case.

It’s bad enough that the political ramifications will hurt Labour, worse still most left commentators are ignoring the economics: the Euro summit was a disaster.

It failed to produce a credible plan to recapitalise the banks or a fund big enough to prop up the various countries on the verge of default. One big spark, such as the collapse of Lehman Bros in 2008, and the entire region could be engulfed in a huge fireball before anyone has time to put it out.

Most people see these debates in simple terms. They will interpret Labour’s calls to work closer with Europe as Ed Miliband asking Cameron to tie our fortunes closer with the Euro. The latter will certainly paint his opponent in those terms once the Euro crashes, leading voters to question whether the Labour leader has Britain’s interests at heart.

There are two key points UK’s pro-Europeans should note.

First, the EU is now effectively dead with the Eurozone+ agreement. As Wolfgang Münchau pointed out, the only way to save the Eurozone now is to destroy the EU. Merkel and Sarkozy won’t let EU laws stand in their way of their urgency and they will be torn in shreds in coming months.

Secondly, the Eurozone deal Mer-kozy are cooking up itself is dangerous. It will preserve the economic bias towards stronger countries such as Germany and France, and take away economic control from weaker countries. It isn’t just undemocratic but fundamentally flawed.

I’m instinctively pro-European too. The collapse of the Euro is now more a matter of when, not if. That makes political integration a doomed project for the foreseeable future.

Plus, trying to turn around decades of Labour’s silence in this debate will be nigh impossible. The communications war was lost ages ago.

There’s only one way to get heard: Ed Miliband should press the reset button and call for a Referendum. He should also accept the EU has failed to connect with Britons. They are suspicious of its bureaucracy, unconvinced by its benefits and not exactly enamoured by the free movement of people it enables.

Only such a bold move will make voters sit up and listen to his case. Only then can the party make common cause with French and German socialists, who are also against the austerity agreements, and make a progressive case for a New Deal across Europe. Until then, Europe is a poisoned chalice.

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About the author
Sunny Hundal is editor of LC. Also: on Twitter, at Pickled Politics and Guardian CIF.
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Reader comments


1. So Much For Subtlety

British people don’t like the EU or its parasitic bureaucracy or their asinine hare brained economic policies ….. so the solution is to allow the British people a vote on leaving …. in order to push for even more parasitic EU bureaucracy with even more asinine hare brained economic policies?

I must have missed something. But by all means, let’s bring it on.

Balls and Alexander had been slowly, gradually, wisely building up Labour a new Eurosceptic profile. What happened? EdM panicked?

Dougie and Balls must be furious that their glorious leader undid all their hard work with a single ill-calculated spurt of Europhile waffle.

I agree with you, but to see the benefits of the EU more clearly perhaps it helps to look at some of the people who oppose it most angrily – John Redwood, etc – and listen to them explain why: it is workers rights. Working time directives, minimum wage, health and safety for workers, the right to strike, these are their grievances.

If it was about sovereignty they’d be annoyed about our relationship with America, or transnational corporations, and if it was about democracy they’d want electoral reform.

They don’t care about these things, they just think the economy has collapsed and become uncompetitive because employers can’t treat workers badly enough anymore.

In addition: “Britain’s Conservatives have overtaken the Labour opposition in an opinion poll for the first time this year, enjoying a bounce on the back of Prime Minister David Cameron’s veto of a new European Union treaty, the latest Reuters/Ipsos MORI poll showed on Wednesday.”

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/12/14/us-britain-politics-poll-idUSTRE7BD08920111214

Once again Labour and EU are behind the curve, the fact is EU and its citizens are bankrupted, to see it as our largest trading partner with a bankrupted economy is the biggest mistake Ed is making and the public now this, just ask the British works at the largest British employer, the Tata Group, this years 8 time more British made Jug’s cars were sold to India then to all the EU countries combined. The recent PWC report stated that British companies have increased the marketing budgets by 150% and making a beeline to and from Asian at the same them as cutting there marketing budgets for Europe.

6. Uniform Fetishist

@ Libertarian Lou 3.

I agree with you, but to see the deficits of the EU more clearly perhaps it helps to look at some of the people who oppose it most angrily – Tony Benn, etc – and listen to them explain why: it is transeuropean corporations. Free movement of capital beyond the control of elected governments, zero accountabilty,and corruption, these are their grievances.

Sunny – I suggest that you and the “left” read Martin Wolf in Wednesday’s FT.

IMO you simply don’t understand the flaws in Mrs Merkel’s plan for an EZ Fiscal Union and why that won’t resolve the fundamental problems of the EZ.

As for the “business community”, part of that was saying Britain had to sign up to the Euro or commercial disaster would ensue. Thank merciful heavens we didn’t follow that advice and stayed out of the Eurozone.

Canada, with a smaller economy than Britain’s, manages well with a Canadian Dollar that has a flexible exchange rate against the US Dollar and despite the US being Canada’s largest export market. The two countries have retained national autonomy in monetary and fiscal policy.

Canada, with a smaller economy than Britain’s, manages well with a Canadian Dollar that has a flexible exchange rate against the US Dollar and despite the US being Canada’s largest export market. The two countries have retained national autonomy in monetary and fiscal policy.

And Canada are about to sign a bilateral free trade agreement with the EU, of the sort that we are always told would be impossible for the UK.

Tim J: “And Canada are about to sign a bilateral free trade agreement with the EU, of the sort that we are always told would be impossible for the UK.”

Thanks for that. In a rational world we should be able to take heart from that but I fear there could be a vindictive streak out there in the politics of some EZ countries – not least at losing what they hoped would be juicy revenues from a Tobin tax on the London financial markets.

As mentioned elsewhere, IMO Sarkozy is playing largely to a domestic audience in the run up to the forthcoming presidential election in France. To some extent, I think Cameron was stitched up but he took the logical course in a context that he didn’t construct or seek. FWIW I think a referendum or a general election on this would back Cameron.

Much of the froth reads and feels very much like the stuff churned out c. 2000 as to why Britain just had to sign up to join the Euro. As we now know, that was nonsense.

10. Man on Clapham Omnibus

The logic of a new deal amongst European socialists is about as convincing as the the outcome of the Merkel/Sarkosy hegemony in Europe.
The Labour party should be looking to encourage trade with emerging world markets instead of the markets killed by the insolvency of the EU. The only way to economic success these days is to innovate.That involves a proper educational system and a receptive capitalist system that will invest in innovation.
If lefties like the EU simply to ensure the continuity of working time directives and so on I suggest that really does cast a sad light on the good ol’ British Public who clearly are unable to independently decide on such matters.
The EU has and always would remain a Capitalists club with all the regional disparity and inequality that entails. That inequality was graphically highlighted on Friday when two countries were able to impose a technocratic solution upon the rest.
I say its time for individual countries to manage their own affairs and reintroduce the powerful economic lever of exchange rates to regain economic control.

Labour is done, they are all done, the EU is done, politics is done, how many times generation after generation are an inadequate bunch of tossers going to inflict pain on there populations from war to economic collapse.

None of the current situation had to be, as usual.

12. Teddy Groves

I think this might be a case where the story benefits Labour more the more it goes on, as it is an opportunity to harm David Cameron’s personal credibility, which is a much more important thing to do than winning a policy argument.

First, all the testimony of people who were involved in the episode, as well as common sense, suggests that David Cameron deliberately torpedoed the summit and generally handled the situation with naivety, incompetence, and bad faith. If so, he has been lying 45-minute style for the last week and therefore cannot be trusted. The more the issue stays in the news the clearer this will become.

Second, it now ought to be possible for Labour to pin the blame for the disastrous summit and whatever bad Euro-stuff happens next on David Cameron. He wrecked the let’s-fix-this-situation meeting. Thanks directly to him, there is now a whole new set of legal problems standing in the way of a solution. Again, the more the issue stays in the news, the easier it will be to argue that Cameron is personally responsible for the Euro crisis.

In my opinion the main way the left tends to ‘miss the point’ is by focusing on policy arguments when it is personal competence that people really care about.

“Second, it now ought to be possible for Labour to pin the blame for the disastrous summit and whatever bad Euro-stuff happens next on David Cameron. He wrecked the let’s-fix-this-situation meeting”

Sorry but what are you on about? What is with this bitching? How in anyway is this behaviour tolerated from professional? And what would labour have done in Camerons place?

“Thanks directly to him, there is now a whole new set of legal problems standing in the way of a solution”

Get out! Is what you would be hearing now from any business worth its name, what was proposed is not a solution.

Second, it now ought to be possible for Labour to pin the blame for the disastrous summit and whatever bad Euro-stuff happens next on David Cameron. He wrecked the let’s-fix-this-situation meeting. Thanks directly to him, there is now a whole new set of legal problems standing in the way of a solution. Again, the more the issue stays in the news, the easier it will be to argue that Cameron is personally responsible for the Euro crisis.

Delusional. And rendered still more delusional with every Member State that dras back from the proposed Treaty.

“Again, the more the issue stays in the news, the easier it will be to argue that Cameron is personally responsible for the Euro crisis.”

In fact you make me sick, this is so completely off the charts, without even taking into consideration that blaming Cameron solves nothing, you are mind numbing and you don’t give a dam about solutions, you just want power.

Do you think this is a fucking game mate?

16. Frances_coppola

12 Teddy Groves

I can’t think of a faster way of making Labour unelectable than for EdM to try to blame Cameron for the Euromess. No-one believes that – except you, it seems.

Tony Benn had it right all along.

18. Anon E Mouse

@17 – Steven

Bang on with Tony Benn.

The Tories also signed every significant treaty this country has had pre Lisbon.

It just seems that Labour are so far out of touch it is breathtaking and what is worse is that they know we know and still continue with it.

Ed Miliband is utterly useless and for the Tories to be ahead in the polls considering all the bad news in the country means that the sooner Labour get rid of that loser the better.

What I predict is that in 12 months time Labour will still be led by that donkey and still excusing the inexcusable – they did the same with Gordon Brown and the sooner they start to read articles like this one the sooner they will wise up….

Is it just me, or has Mr Cameron (to be fair, with the help of some posturing from M. Sarkozy) unleashed something of a sesimic shift in the politics of the internet, if not the country? Probably not what he intended mind, but he seems to be that sort of person – things happen around him.

And therein may lie the biggest flaw in the stupid idea of trying to pin the Eurozone crisis on a British Prime Minister not in the Euro, not in power when the crisis started (arguably about 1996 actually…) and who made it clear he was happy for Eurozone countries to sort this out amongst themselves so long as he had continued economic autonomy (or freedom to loot – I don’t care which interpretation) for his own country. That even if you could construct that narrative without being laughed out of town, Mr Cameron’s ability to make things happen around him would probably change the game again.

Recap:

The Eurozone went sick for the very reasons that sceptics before the launch of the Euro in January 2000 – like the late Rudi Dornbusch, prof of international economics at the MIT and other economists – said it would go sick. Their analysis has been tested and found dependable.

Only Luxembourg was eligible to join the launch of the Euro according to the Maastricht convergence criteria.

No wonder that Delors, the EU Commission president at the lead up to Maastricht, disowned the Euro a week or so back because the safeguarding plans he had built in were ignored.

Trying to stick the failure of the EU summit last Friday on Cameron, isn’t credible.

The realities of EU politics are all about arm-twisting, not about the economic analysis of the hazards awaiting the formation of monetary unions when there is insufficient convergence among participating countries and no fiscal union to transfer compensating funds from chronic trade surplus countries to chronic deficit countries to offset the depressing effects of trade deficits.

The budget deficits of EZ countries with trade deficits were intended to counter-balance the depressing effects of the trade deficits.

An EU fiscal union which is only a legal structure to inflict punishments on countries which breach financial discipline rules will exert a depressing effect on the EZ.

The EZ had a code for fiscal discipline – the Growth and Stability Pact of 1995 – but that was widely breached, including by France and Germany. The fact is that EZ member states can’t be relied on to stick to mutual agreements when they believe it to be in their national interest to breach those agreements. So much for the “integrity of the EU”.

21. Teddy Groves

Forgive me. When we have clear evidence of the most popular and important member of the government behaving incompetently and dishonestly with the fate of the world economy at stake, it is absolutely inexcusable for anti-government campaigners not to make the most of it.

Maybe, though I haven’t seen anything here to make me think so, the best way to do that isn’t to try to blame Cameron for the entire Euro-crisis, but the discussion should be about how best to attack government-members’ personal reputations rather than about what policy position the opposition ought to take.

The fact that the idea of blaming the prime minister for any piece of bad news, let alone one he has nakedly worsened through incompetence and lied about, can seem ‘off the charts’ or ‘delusional’ is telling.

Maybe, though I haven’t seen anything here to make me think so, the best way to do that isn’t to try to blame Cameron for the entire Euro-crisis,

Jeeze, you think? You mean Cameron isn’t personally to blame for the internal trade imbalances of the Eurozone, nor for Greece’s fraudulent official statistics, nor for German banks’ wildly imprudent trading strategies? Who knew? Clown.

@12: Good post Ted

Some of these tory morons would have us believe cameron was some sort of great statesman.

In truth he`s a liar and a waste of fuking space.

24. Teddy Groves

Yes, just like Gordon Brown wasn’t personally to blame for the financial crisis or Britain’s deficit. Shouter.

“When we have clear evidence of the most popular and important member of the government behaving incompetently and dishonestly with the fate of the world economy at stake”

Its been happening for over a decade, the entire EZ project and the players are numerous, you did not seem to care then?

” It is absolutely inexcusable for anti-government campaigners not to make the most of it”

It is absolutely inexcusable that you fuckwits, ABSOLUTELY lacking ANY understanding, have and continue to attack the people who raised concerns, in fact they explained exactly what would happen, didt they,and now at this hour you continue to treat the governing of a county as nothing more than a 6th form debate group, nothing more than taking any issue and using it to win a game of impressions, Your kind are the exact class that have bought this country and many beyond its borders to its knees.

Anything, anything but why the economics of the Eurozone is sick – as predicted it would become – and what needs to be done about that.

Compared with that, Cameron is incidental.

Sadly, we are back in the silly debating froth that preceded the launch of the Euro which is why the Eurozone is sick.

Teddy,

Yes, just like Gordon Brown wasn’t personally to blame for the financial crisis or Britain’s deficit. Shouter.

Erm, he was the chancellor then the prime minister at the time the deficit built up – and was involved in the reordering of the regulatory system as well. He is not the only cause, but he was involved.

Anyway, if you think that the best way to make a political point is to attack the character of your opponents, best of luck. Allow me to introduce you to the British public though, who while they may judge a man (or woman) themselves, tend not to be very approving of personal attacks where politics is concerned. After all, how effective was labelling Messrs Cameron and Osborne ‘toffs’?

If you really think there is political gain in impugning the competency of the senior Conservatives, you also have to ask how is this going to help anyone else – has Labour got competent figures to take their place in the public mind (I’d guess no for example).

But I could be wrong – and you could have no good ideas and be engaged in mindless tribal politics. I know which one I think much more likely (hint – it’s the one about you being an idiot).

“There’s only one way to get heard: Ed Miliband should press the reset button and call for a Referendum”

A referendum now?

As a Eurosceptic I’ve long supported a referendum in principle – but you should be careful what you wish for, Sunny.

I’m assuming you’re thinking that demanding a referendum now would split the coalition? Correct me if I’m wrong, but you’re thinking is that either Cameron would say yes and the Lib Dems would storm off, or that Cameron would say no and the Tory backbenchers would ally with Labour to defeat the government and force an election.

Let us be clear – any election that is held on the Europe will lead to a Tory overall majority to 2017. No ifs, no buts – that is what will happen. A general election that is forced on the question of Europe will be fought on the question of Europe. And the Tories would waltz that.

If that’s not your intention – fine, but I’m not sure where a referendum gets Labour (which isn’t my concern, but is yours). Labour can either support leaving the EU, which would make it almost certain that Cameron takes the same line and so there’s no benefit to Labour; or Labour would back staying in the EU, at a time when that argument stands a very small chance of winning. If Labour forced a referendum and then lost it, my god they’d look stupid.

As I said – be careful what you wish for.

Better to press Cameron on whether he supports continued austerity in the Eurozone – a measure now opposed by plenty of right-wing economic commentators (despite their support for austerity in Britain). Given that Cameron was the one who ran around the world promoting austerity, it’d be quite a u-turn for him to admit that austerity in the Eurozone is bad, and would also open up the question of why austerity should apply in Britain but not Europe (a question Cameron can answer, but only by getting bogged down in detail). By contrast, if Cameron backs Eurozone austerity, that would put him in a minority even on the Right, and when the house of cards comes crashing down and gets blamed on austerity, he can take the hit on that.

Think about it.

Dear All

I think the idea of calling for a referendum may well be the right one.

But it would almost certainly lead to EU exit.

It would therefore in logic be impossible to make common cause with

others in the EU on policy out of power and in power you would have

little influence on the rules of the Eurozone/EU unless you continued to

lend/donate the profit from withdrawal.

This would be political suicide.

One reason motivating the likelihood of a majority “Out” vote at a referendum is the near impossibility of conducting a rational discussion on the root causes of the Eurozone malaise and what to do about it.

The sad fact – from long experience – is that the reality of EU politics is more about arm-twisting than rational discussion of diagnostics and the substantive policy issues. What transpired at the EU summit confirms that and that is why support for Euroscepticism has been increasing on trend. Successive EU Commission polling has found Britain to be the most or nearly the most Eurosceptical member of the EU.

The arm-twisting style of EU politics has become very tiresome.

So we go into an election effectively advocating withdrawal?

Because it was such a roaring success last time we tried it?

Jimmy,

Because it was such a roaring success last time we tried it?

I would suggest possibly having a manifesto not full of perceived-as-very-left-wing policies when you do so. Also, putting the proposal to an electorate that does not like Europe as much might well work better?

History is not a list of what not to do you know.

The ridiculous thing is that the majority of the British population don’t actually know what the EU does, or why it does it. The EU does a crap job of explaining itself, the British government enjoys having a handy scapegoat, and the press have found that short sighted and narrow minded xenophobia sells papers. What a surprise.

If you explain to people the concept of a single market, the need for a common set of regulations in that market, the goals of reducing trade barriers, the idea that economic integration reduces the possibility of war, the fact that acting as a group gives us more clout in trade negotiations, etc etc etc.

Then generally people go… oh, right, well that makes sense.

Actually historically Labour has always been more eurosceptic.
It was the party that allowed a referendum. Wilson and Callaghan were very suspicious of the Euro bankers and the ideas behind the community. Benn forecasted the demise of the market.
Even Brown and Blair were not europhiles hence the decision to stay outside the euro.
Actually the PM that assigned more power to Europe more than any other was Thatcher. That certainly was the view of John Major.
Personally I think Cameron was correct (to be honest Brown and Blair would have done the same, althgough the dogs and bitches of the press would have called them cowing down to europe instead of standing up to Europe)
and Milliband missed a trick. Just keep your gob shut and allow the Lib dems to fight the euro corner.

35. Tax Obesity, Not Business

@ 33:

“If you explain to people the concept of a single market, the need for a common set of regulations in that market…”

But you don’t need an ever-closer union to achieve that. That could be achieved by a single treaty and a small secretariat – without the anti-democratic apparatus of a quasi-state.

“the idea that economic integration reduces the possibility of war,”

Economic inter-dependency and free trade will achieve that – and, again, without the anti-democratic apparatus of a quasi-state. The EU’s half-witted attempts at economic integration have recently rekindled the animosities resulting from WW2, which is ironic given that the Europhiliacs claim that the EEC/EU has given Europe peace – not democracy, Nato and trade.

“acting as a group gives us more clout in trade negotiations”

And, again, we don’t need ever-closer union and the anti-democratic apparatus of a quasi-state to work with other countries in trade negotiations.

The lack of understanding in this piece is absolutely jaw-dropping. Congratulations. You are now part of the arrogant and useless London clique who are unable to see anything other than through their own prejudices. Of course, everything Johnny Foreigner tries will fail – they can’t do anything wiithout someone from London to issue instructions.

What are you doing? Pitching for a job on the Telegraph?

Chris – That’s just garbage, the usual abuse instead of analysis. The fundamental criticism about EMU tracks back to economists writing in the 1990s with warnings then about the prospect of instability if there was insufficient convergence between the economies of participating national economies.

The US and Canada get on harmoniously with a flexible exchange rate between their currencies and engagement in a free trade area while retaining national autonomy in fiscal and monetary policy. Monetary union with all its inherent problems was an unnecessary adjunct to a customs union in Europe. Unfortunately, Europhoria took hold and blocked out rational analysis.

According to this morning’s news, Cameron is saying that he doesn’t expect Britain to be contributing more than £10bn to the IMF to bolster its aid resources, well short of the £30bn mooted as Britain’s contribution at the EU summit. He is reported as saying that the EZ should be sorting out its own financial crisis.
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/069c0636-267c-11e1-91cd-00144feabdc0.html#axzz1gb2Yt6uZ

Ever closer to Europe? The politics of mainland Europe tends to be qualitatively different from British politics. The latest European news:

A French court has given former President Jacques Chirac a two-year suspended prison sentence for diverting public funds and abusing public confidence.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-16194089

Before Berlusconi became the longest serving prime minister of Italy, that credit was held by Andreotti:

“He has long strived to restore his reputation, tarnished after accusations of links to the underworld surfaced in 1993. But the appeals court found him guilty of the 1979 murder of an investigative journalist – overturning a previous acquittal.”
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/483295.stm

Try the present French foreign minister, Alain Juppe:

A court has found former French Prime Minister Alain Juppe guilty of involvement in a party funding scam in Paris in the 1980s and early 1990s. Juppe, one of President Jacques Chirac’s closest allies, immediately appealed against the conviction. The court gave him an 18-month suspended sentence and barred him from political office for up to 10 years.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/3444239.stm

Neville

An awful lot of banks in Europe and Germany have powerful vested interests in keeping the Euro going somehow or other.

If EZ countries were to revert to national currencies, the DMark would appreciate relative to its locked position in the Euro because of Germany’s large trade surplus amounting to 5.2 pc of Germany’s GDP.

Swathes of German industry making tradable goods and services would be rendered uncompetitive as a result. That is not a scenario German business wants to see realised and there would be strong pressure on Merkel’s coalition government to do whatever it takes to salvage the Euro..

Sunny,

Sounds more to me like your prescription for the UK is likely to lead to isolation. Like many people recently you describe yourself as ‘instinctively’ pro-European, and yet you seem rather sanguine about consigning the European project to the scrapheap of history. The trouble is, like all the others you have no coherent plan or vision about what to replace it with, and more particularly what the UK’s place as semi-detached Europeans will be.

Of course, it is rather like your position after your damascene conversion to Labour…. on the basis of what?! Jam tomorrow? The supposition that ‘things can only get better’ (now where have I heard that one before…?)

The UK public would no doubt vote to leave the EU – whether that’s a rational response is more open to question. Most of those who voted Thatcher in lived to rue the day she made her sickening Francis of Assisi speech. Even if the UK leaves the EU, or becomes part of some semi-detached second division or outer tier, we will still have to deal with the fact that half our trade is with them.

It has been a tragedy for both the UK and the EU that over generations successive UK governments have failed to fully engage with the EU – we have effectively handed the EU over to the Franco-German combine, much to the disgust of other states who would probably have supported us.

In the long run, it IS probably better that England leaves or disengages; it seems to have little else to offer, and little appetite to really be involved. Whether that will be better for our economy remains to be seen. Whether it is better for us internationally is even less certain. there is no guarantee that a ‘new’ EU will agree to pander to our atavistic need to have the benefits of the EU, but try to opt out of anything we don’t like.

Don’t imagine that the break up of the EU will be without resonance for the UK as a supra-national state either; the Scots will be watching closely, and may feel that staying within the EU is in their interests, or that if ‘England’ decides to opt out, they may as well take the Norwegian option.

Where would that leave the rump UK I wonder? Certainly with a much reduced role… and maybe in the end that’s no bad thing? For too long the post-imperial delusions of grandeur have skewed British policy.


Reactions: Twitter, blogs
  1. Liberal Conspiracy

    Why Labour can no longer afford to get closer to Europe http://t.co/e8uUv7II

  2. sunny hundal

    Why I think Labour and @Ed_Miliband can no longer afford to get closer to Europe http://t.co/FfxoHn2c

  3. Owen Blacker

    Why Labour can no longer afford to get closer to Europe http://t.co/e8uUv7II

  4. paulstpancras

    Why I think Labour and @Ed_Miliband can no longer afford to get closer to Europe http://t.co/FfxoHn2c

  5. Neil Walshaw

    Why I think Labour and @Ed_Miliband can no longer afford to get closer to Europe http://t.co/FfxoHn2c

  6. Jules

    Why I think Labour and @Ed_Miliband can no longer afford to get closer to Europe http://t.co/FfxoHn2c

  7. Chad Noble

    Why I think Labour and @Ed_Miliband can no longer afford to get closer to Europe http://t.co/FfxoHn2c

  8. Malcolm Kennedy

    Why Labour can no longer afford to get closer to Europe http://t.co/e8uUv7II

  9. Mark Chivers

    Why Labour can no longer afford to get closer to Europe http://t.co/e8uUv7II

  10. sunny hundal

    …only way I think Labour can get heard by voters on Europe is by offering a referendum http://t.co/FfxoHn2c

  11. MayorWatch

    …only way I think Labour can get heard by voters on Europe is by offering a referendum http://t.co/FfxoHn2c

  12. Liz Todd

    “@sunny_hundal: Why I think Labour and @Ed_Miliband can no longer afford to get closer to Europe http://t.co/nGtaildD” sadly I agree

  13. Martin Coxall

    Why Labour can no longer afford to get closer to Europe | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/2R60Y2sQ

  14. House Of Twits

    RT @sunny_hundal …only way I think Labour can get heard by voters on Europe is by offering a referendum http://t.co/iJCcWOTM

  15. Neill Shenton

    RT @sunny_hundal: Why I think Labour & @Ed_Miliband can no longer afford 2 get closer 2 Europe http://t.co/Bkzbh190 <scary but true I think

  16. Benjamin Gray

    Why Labour can no longer afford to get closer to Europe | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/2R60Y2sQ

  17. Matthew Dugdale

    “@Grabcocque: Why Labour can no longer afford to get closer to Europe | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/mlpFTLuR” <<the penny is dropping

  18. Brucemoll

    Why I think Labour and @Ed_Miliband can no longer afford to get closer to Europe http://t.co/FfxoHn2c

  19. John West

    …only way I think Labour can get heard by voters on Europe is by offering a referendum http://t.co/FfxoHn2c

  20. David Taylor

    Why Labour can no longer afford to get closer to Europe http://t.co/e8uUv7II

  21. Owen Richards

    …only way I think Labour can get heard by voters on Europe is by offering a referendum http://t.co/FfxoHn2c

  22. Leon Green

    Why I think Labour and @Ed_Miliband can no longer afford to get closer to Europe http://t.co/FfxoHn2c

  23. Dan Fox

    Why I think Labour and @Ed_Miliband can no longer afford to get closer to Europe http://t.co/FfxoHn2c

  24. Andrew Bower

    …only way I think Labour can get heard by voters on Europe is by offering a referendum http://t.co/FfxoHn2c

  25. Andrew Bower

    …only way I think Labour can get heard by voters on Europe is by offering a referendum http://t.co/FfxoHn2c

  26. Alex Canfor-Dumas

    Labour calls for an In/Out referendum grow: @PeterWatt123: http://t.co/fgzp63DD and @sunny_hundal: http://t.co/hiV6NGsF

  27. James Mackenzie

    RT @libcon Why Labour can no longer afford to get closer to Europe http://t.co/LYGiJwur « Clearly.

  28. The People's Pledge

    …only way I think Labour can get heard by voters on Europe is by offering a referendum http://t.co/FfxoHn2c

  29. Chad Noble

    …only way I think Labour can get heard by voters on Europe is by offering a referendum http://t.co/FfxoHn2c

  30. Olly Neville

    …only way I think Labour can get heard by voters on Europe is by offering a referendum http://t.co/FfxoHn2c

  31. Ben Mitchell

    Why Labour can no longer afford to get closer to Europe | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/u8xY5VUY via @libcon Indeed.

  32. sunny hundal

    Why I think Labour and @Ed_Miliband can no longer afford to get closer to Europe http://t.co/FfxoHn2c and should call for a referendum

  33. Sarah Modlock

    Why I think Labour and @Ed_Miliband can no longer afford to get closer to Europe http://t.co/FfxoHn2c and should call for a referendum

  34. Tony Leech

    Why I think Labour and @Ed_Miliband can no longer afford to get closer to Europe http://t.co/FfxoHn2c and should call for a referendum

  35. Simon Hinde

    This is correct, I think. RT @sunny_hundal: Labour and @Ed_Miliband shdnt get closer to Europe http://t.co/HsxSDJoD; shd call for referendum

  36. Peter Kenyon

    @sunny_hundal MT Why I think Labour/@Ed_Miliband …sd call for a referendum [on Europe] http://t.co/dQwcscwn <Breaking 1st referendum rule

  37. Lewis Miller

    http://t.co/eeUycTq3 Just read this "Why Labour can no longer afford to get closer to Europe". Repeated NO NO NO NO. #no #no #no #no #no #no

  38. sunny hundal

    @DelroyBooth oh I forgot the link…. http://t.co/uzKg0xUu

  39. Why Labour should remain close to Europe | Twelve Gold Stars

    [...] read this post by Sunny Hundal recently about why Britain should move further away from the EU. It symbolised a viewpoint which has [...]

  40. Frances Coppola

    Why Labour can no longer afford to get closer to Europe | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/RO5jtvxW via @libcon

  41. pi = 3.1415926

    RT @Frances_Coppola: Why Labour can no longer afford to get closer to Europe Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/zeF5C9TX via @libcon

  42. Alex Bottrill

    Why Labour can no longer afford to get closer to Europe | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/RO5jtvxW via @libcon

  43. sunny hundal

    @johnb78 @yorksranter @AdamBienkov @jonworth I've partly made some of my arguments against EU membership here http://t.co/Ffxk9N1i





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