Academics says Labour MP maligned teacher


1:31 pm - May 30th 2011

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The independent* Labour MP Denis MacShane is harshly criticised in a letter signed by dozens of respected academics across the country, published today on Liberal Conspiracy, ourKingdom and Crooked Timber.

He is accused of using the Parliamentary platform “to traduce the reputation of a teacher”, in a debate in the House of Commons on Human Trafficking.

On 18th May, Denis MacShane said:

My hon. Friend mentioned the London School of Economics. Is she aware of its feminist political theory course, taught by Professor Anne Phillips? In week 8 of the course, students study prostitution. The briefing says:

“If we consider it legitimate for women to hire themselves out as low-paid and often badly treated cleaners, why is it not also legitimate for them to hire themselves out as prostitutes?”

If a professor at the London School of Economics cannot make the distinction between a cleaning woman and a prostituted woman, we are filling the minds of our young students with the most poisonous drivel.

Fiona Mactaggart MP replied by stating:

I share my right hon. Friend’s view about those attitudes. I hope that the LSE provides sufficient contest to Professor Phillips’s frankly nauseating views on that issue.

The debate caused an uproar across in the academic community and several blogs have since posted about the exchange.

(* MacShane is suspended from the Parliamentary Labour Party)

Update: Denis MacShane MP has now accepted he made a mistake. In a comment posted to the ourKingdom blog he says:

Gosh, well it makes a change from the BNP and Europhobes having a go. Sorry if I have upset so many people but I have spent years fighting against the view that being obliged by debt, drugs, poverty, patriarchy, or brute force into being a prostituted woman is on a par with just another job.

I am either hopelessly behind or ahead of the times but try, try, try as a I might I do not think we will tackle the ever-increasing rates of trafficking of women and children into being commodities for male penetration and profit until we make men responsible. The prostituted women are everywhere. Their clients are nowhere. And, yes, I was upset that students should be invited to consider that the commodification of women and children should be put on a par with being a cleaner. I assume no-one has read my speech in the debate rather than my short and out-of-context intervention or other speeches or articles going back over the years on this.

I am happy to accept that I took out of context what was not seen as in any way objectionable. And I do not wish to insult LSE professors and their friends. I just wish I was 100 per cent certain that everyone who has protested has thought this through and that there is not a scintilla of concern out there in academistan that rather than posit an either/or argument a stand might be taken.

* * * * * * * *

Statement from the Association of Political Thought

During the debate on Human Trafficking on 18 May 2011 (Hansard Col 94WH) Denis MacShane MP, quoting from the list of essay titles for an academic political theory course at the London School of Economics, accused a distinguished professor, Anne Phillips FBA, of being unable to tell the difference between waged work and prostitution, and of filling the minds of students ‘with poisonous drivel’.

Fiona McTaggart MP agreed, accusing Phillips of holding ‘frankly nauseating views on that issue’.

The ineptitude of this exchange – which is now forever on the official record – is extraordinary.

Students are asked why we should distinguish between the sale of one’s labour and the sale or letting of one’s body. That condones neither the latter nor the former. It encourages students to reflect on how to draw an important line between things appropriate and things inappropriate for market exchange. Asking such questions, far from being ‘nauseating’, is central to public debate about policy and legislation.

If Members of Parliament cannot tell the difference between an essay problem and an assertion of belief how can we trust them to legislate effectively?

Parliamentary debate is a cornerstone of our constitution and political culture. However, using the privilege of a Parliamentary platform ignorantly to traduce the reputation of a teacher of political theory is a dereliction of office.

Members and supporters of the Britain and Ireland Association for Political Thought
David Owen, Southampton University
Michael Freeden, University of Oxford
Christopher Brooke, University of Cambridge
Marc Stears, University of Oxford
Simon Caney, University of Oxford
Stuart White, University of Oxford
Aletta Norval, University of Essex
Iain Hampsher-Monk, University of Exeter
Richard Bellamy, University College London
Thom Brooks, University of Newcastle
Raia Prokhovnik, Open University
Chris Brown, London School of Economics
Bonnie Honig, Northwestern University, Chicago, USA
Nicola Lacey, University of Oxford
Elizabeth Frazer, University of Oxford
Martin O’Neill, University of York
Tim Hayward, University of Edinburgh
Mark Philp, University of Oxford
Albert Weale, University College London
Kimberly Hutchings, London School of Economics
Kenneth Macdonald, University of Oxford
Chandran Kukathas, London School of Economics
Hillel Steiner, Universities of Manchester and Salford
Christopher Bertram, University of Bristol
Paul Kelly, London School of Economics
Jules Townshend, Manchester Metropolitan University
Emily Jackson, London School of Economics
Gary Browning, Oxford Brookes University
Adrian Blau, University of Manchester
Russell Keat, University of Edinburgh
David Leopold, University of Oxford
Katrin Flikschuh, London School of Economics
Cecile Laborde, University College London
Engin Isin, Open University
Dario Castiglione, University of Exeter
Clare Hemmings, London School of Economics
Christian List, London School of Economics
Evangelia Sembou, Political Studies Association of the United Kingdom
David Miller, University of Oxford
Wendy Stokes, London Metropolitan University
Ruth Kinna, Loughborough University
Joni Lovenduski, Birkbeck University of London
Moya Lloyd, Loughborough University
Cecile Fabre, University of Oxford
Adam Swift, University of Oxford
Vincent Geoghegan, Queens University Belfast
Jennifer Hornsby, Birkbeck University of London
Lynn Dobson, University of Edinburgh
David Howarth, University of Essex
Reidar Maliks, University of Oxford
Nicholas Southwood, University of Oxford
Jeremy Jennings, Queen Mary’s University of London

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Reader comments


This is typical of the lazy anti-intellectualism often taken out for a spin in parliament and I am pleased the academic community has so quickly acted to point out the moribund nature of this exchange.

‘The ineptitude of this exchange – which is now forever on the official record – is extraordinary.’

Quite.

‘The Labour MP Denis MacShane…’

Though I must add – with some relish – that this is currently inaccurate:

http://www.labourlist.org/party-confirms-macshane-suspension

Thanks, I’ve updated the post now

4. Rogue_Leader

The question would have been better framed as “Is it preferable for a woman (or man) to be forced by economic circumstances into a low-paid job or to choose to work as a prostitute?” Discussions about sex industry workers always seem to assume that coercion is on play, reducing women’s role in the sex industry to that of pawns or slaves. In fact, many women choose to work as dancers or prostitutes in preference to minimum-wage servitude.

Anne Phillips taught me a ‘Marx and his twentieth century successors’ course back in the early 1980s. Macshane would *really* have hated that one.

For information, in consequence of legislation by Gerhard Schröder’s Social Democrat led government, prostitution was legalised in the Federal Republic of Germany as from 2002:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostitution_in_Germany#Legislative_reform_.282002.29

“In 8 European countries (Netherlands, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Greece, Turkey, Hungary and Latvia) prostitution is legal and regulated.”
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostitution_in_Europe

By accounts, downstream assessments in Germany of the results of the legislation are mixed but this report in 2008, sponsored by Manchester Action on Street Health, are largely favourable:
http://www.mash.org.uk/userfiles/file/Berlin%20Report.pdf

FWIW I believe it is often illuminating to compare experience in other west European countries before coming (? leaping) to judgement on policies for Britain to consider and debate.

McShane and McTaggart showing you, once again, what a bunch of tiny-minded dinosaurs so many in the Labour Party really are. No better than the Tories.

What rather got to me was that Prof Anne Phillips FBA was doing something that academics often do – juxtaposing paradoxical alternative courses of action or descriptions to promote academic debate without necessarily endorsing either. Messers MacShane and McTaggart were plainly being obtuse (? thick) in not recognising that so no cigar there.

Had the prof said something along the following lines, I would have understood their concerns:

“Dr Brooke Magnanti may inspire quite a few more students after the unexpected hike in university tuition fees:

“‘For the past six years Dr Magnanti has been writing anonymously as Belle de Jour about working as a £300-an-hour prostitute to clear her student debts.'” [November 2009]
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1228424/I-introduced-Belle-Jour-Brooke-Magnanti-vice-girls-says-father.html

The ability & experience to critically think about how one differentiates between acceptable and unacceptable behaviour is *exactly* what I’d want a political theory course to teach.

Without that differentiation, framing law just comes down to subjective “I know it when I see it” aka a populist tabloid-headline-driven “BAN WHAT I DON’T LIKE!!!”

Similarly, a political theory course should also enable the students’ critical thinking about the population’s ability to pursue happiness through the choices available, and what happens when those choices are constrained to the point of coercion.

Again, an appreciation of this greatly informs understanding of the actions of those on benefit, and avoids the nasty scapegoating we’ve seen in the last few days.

If McShane et al really can’t see the point of this, he really has no qualification to participate in a legislative body.

Gobsmacked by the stupidity on display here. The contempt in which so many people hold our members of parliament has rarely seemed so well-deserved.

Politicians really need to learn to butt out and let academics do their jobs.

12. Chaise Guevara

I notice that he attacks the professor for being unable to see the distinction between people in the two jobs, yet doesn’t actually explain what the difference is…

“My prejudices are obviously right, I don’t need to explain why, and if you disagree with me you’re a menace to society.”

What a collossal prat.

@12: “What a collossal prat”

Exactly. Had Dr MacShane – yes, unbelievably, Dr MacShane has a PhD in economics from London University, although not from the LSE – been better educated, he might have known that there are heavyweight papers from highly respected academic journals on the social and economic theories of prostitution. I suspect Prof Anne Phillips was taking her cue from this paper: A Theory of Prostitution, by Lena Edlund and Evelyn Korn (JPE 2002):

Abstract: Prostitution is low-skill, labor intensive, female, and well paid. This
paper proposes a marriage market explanation to this puzzle. If a
prostitute compromises her marriage market prospects, she will have
to be compensated for forgone marriage market opportunities. We
discuss the link between poverty and prostitution and show that prostitution
may decrease with male income if wives and prostitutes are
drawn from the same pool of women. We point to the role of male
sex ratios, and males in transit, in sustaining high levels of prostitution,
and we discuss possible reasons for its low reputation and implications.
http://the-idea-shop.com/papers/prostitution.pdf

There are many intriguing academic puzzles about the market for prostitutes. Dr Brooke Magnanti wasn’t the only young woman who financed her higher education in that market. There was also Miss S who wrote: Confessions of a Working Girl (Penguin Books, 2007), which I first came across among the “best sellers” for family reading on display in a Tesco superstore, all at attractive discounts, naturally.

Just one of the many puzzles is trying to understand how Dr Magnanti can earn £300/hour while: “Brothels in the city offer sex for as little as £15, and some are charging £10 extra for unprotected intercourse, the Poppy Project in Southwark found.”
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7597232.stm

What sustains this large price differential when market entry costs are low and few specialist skills are required for the job? If you don’t believe that, how does the estranged wife of a Conservative MP get to work in this market – from news last year in my local paper, which I get daily by email:

MP’s wife in North Cheam massage parlour:
http://www.suttonguardian.co.uk/news/8381112.Sex_shame__MP_s_wife_in_North_Cheam_massage_parlour/

14. Charlieman

@8. Bob B quotes Dr Brooke Magnanti: “‘For the past six years Dr Magnanti has been writing anonymously as Belle de Jour about working as a £300-an-hour prostitute to clear her student debts.”

Brooke Magnanti started to write the Belle de Jour blog in the interregnum between submitting her PhD written thesis and the face-to-face interview. She had previously written fiction on short story web sites. Magnanti pursued her PhD at Sheffield University and sent a few BdJ emails and blog comments from .ac.uk IP addresses. Alas, all of the commentary about those submissions is lost in internet mistiness. She then switched to using a HushMail account for any exchanges.

Perhaps we can accept that she was an InterCity Express hooker. Or that she crammed a lot of activity into a short space of time. Perhaps.

@Charlieman: “Perhaps we can accept that she was an InterCity Express hooker. Or that she crammed a lot of activity into a short space of time. Perhaps.”

A little web research will easily retrieve citations to many different mainstream media sources supporting claims that it is possible to earn several hundred pounds an hour as an escort girl or by working in up-market brothels – and also that the brothel market is booming, including my local market. Here are a few examples:

Yes, Whorehouses UK Ltd is doing a cracking trade.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/columnists/janice_turner/article3419819.ece

Everything about Kimberly is discreet; there are no naked breasts, no itinerary of sexual services, no euphemistic reference to massage and absolutely no mention of the word prostitute. Instead she tells us she is “a well dressed and intelligent lady with natural conversational skills”. For £250 an hour, she offers a tête-à-tête at her home, evenings out or cosy-sounding visits to a local pizza parlour.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2000/may/11/gender.uk

A British woman accused of running one of Europe’s most elaborate and expensive prostitution rings was jailed for four years yesterday – her 44th birthday – after being convicted by a French court of “aggravated pimping”.
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/british-boss-of-european-escort-agency-gets-four-years-for-aggravated-pimping-584445.html

The interest to economists is that this is a classic example of a vertically differentiated market in which substantive or perceived quality differences can sustain widely different prices as compared with the conventional model in which market forces will result in prices converging through competitive pressures. Btw one of Prof Anne Phillips’ academic colleagues, Prof John Sutton, has an outstanding international reputation for his analysis of vertically differentiated markets:

Endogenous market structures and globalisation
http://www.intertic.org/Conference/Sutton.pdf

All of this goes to show that Dr MacShane is really rather clueless. But don’t blame his constituents in Rotherham for selecting him – he was parachuted in by Labour’s central office. Try his entry in Wikipedia.

16. Charlieman

Bob, your interpretation is too literal.

17. So Much For Subtlety

“Students are asked why we should distinguish between the sale of one’s labour and the sale or letting of one’s body. That condones neither the latter nor the former. It encourages students to reflect on how to draw an important line between things appropriate and things inappropriate for market exchange. Asking such questions, far from being ‘nauseating’, is central to public debate about policy and legislation.”

It is naive in the extreme to think that this is just asking questions. As I expect that everyone here knows. It is just hiding one’s political preferences behind a smoke screen of plausible deniability. After all if students had been asked to discuss the disadvantages of letting low-income, low-IQ people from an Afro-Caribbean background get benefits in order to have more children, we would be having a very different sort of conversation. No one here would tolerate that behind the fiction of just asking questions central to public debate.

@16 Charlieman: “Bob, your interpretation is too literal.”

How do know? Any citations to support your interpretation of extensive evidence that escort girls and and girls working in up-market brothels can make good money.

If the pay is so miserable, why the evidence of booming numbers of brothels and escort girls. More here about the wife of the Conservative MP who: “is working as a £70-a-time prostitute, the Sunday Mirror can reveal.”

When asked whether she minded selling her body Carla replied: “I like it here, nice clients, nice people, nice place and good money.”

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/top-stories/2010/09/04/tory-mp-mike-weatherley-s-wife-working-as-a-prostitute-115875-22537899/

The LibDem controlled Sutton council recently went out on a public consultation exercise on its new draft policy for “sex shops”. I phoned the council offices to ask for a copy but they refused point blank to send me a copy – so much for “open government”. In due course a policy was recently approved by the council. Here is the press report from 12 May:

“Sutton Council have adopted a tough new policy in relation to any lap dancing clubs planning to open in the borough. Currently there are no lap dancing clubs, sex shops or sex cinemas in Sutton, but in the future, anyone wishing to open one in the borough will now have to specifically apply for a sex establishment licence.”
http://www.suttonguardian.co.uk/news/9020736.Council_adopts_new_policy_on_sex_establishments/

Apparently, the massage parlours in which Carla worked don’t count as “sex shops”. LOL!

Btw Charlieman, have you no comments for us about prostitution and vertically differentiated markets and Prof Anne Phillips?

“If we consider it legitimate for women to hire themselves out as low-paid and often badly treated cleaners, why is it not also legitimate for them to hire themselves out as prostitutes?”

It’s a good question, but could actually be even more bluntly posed as ‘if it is considered legitimate to sell one’s labour, why is it not also legitimate to sell one’s body?’ Either way, it’s hardly advocating prostitution.

The news that MacShane is an idiot should hardly come as a surprise though.

Of course this is a legitimate question to pose, any student who is likely to move into a career requiring their input into social policy, law, ethics and philosophy will need to have the ability to tease-apart personal feelings, social values and the individual.
Would it have been less contraversial if the question had related to surrogacy and the renting out of female wombs?

@19: “The news that MacShane is an idiot should hardly come as a surprise though.”

But he was Tony Blair’s minister for Europe from 2002 until the general election in 2005, probably because of his unstinting enthusiasm for joining the Euro – which only goes to show how much understanding he had of the (unstable) economics of monetary unions despite his PhD in “international economics”.

IMO posters here haven’t appreciated the broad significance of vertically differentiated markets.

We think we understand why a Rolls Royce Phantom at £250,000 is more expensive to buy than, say, a Vauxhall Corsa at £12,050. But how come it’s often possible to buy 10mg tablets X 30 of Loratadine for hay fever and allegy relief for less than £1 in supermarkets as compared with this in Boots?
http://www.boots.com/en/Boots-Non-Drowsy-Hayfever-and-Allergy-Relief-10mg-Tablets-Loratadine-30-Tablets_12406/

Compare the price of a packet of Ibuprofen 200mg tablets for pain relief with the price of a packet Nurofen 200mg tablets – or the price difference between a 2 litre bottle of Coca-Cola and an own-brand bottle of Cola in a supermarket.

Vertical differentiation in markets is far more common than is generally recognised. In that context, the differences in the earning power of prostitutes becomes much easier to comprehend.

22. Chaise Guevara

@ 17 SMFS

” It is just hiding one’s political preferences behind a smoke screen of plausible deniability.”

Well, possibly. But even then McShane should have been able to do better than “you’re wrong and you’re harming students”. He could have, y’know, at least attempted to actually engage in the debate.

“After all if students had been asked to discuss the disadvantages of letting low-income, low-IQ people from an Afro-Caribbean background get benefits in order to have more children, we would be having a very different sort of conversation”

Why Afro-Carribbean? I ask because while this is a legitimate enough topic overall, I don’t see how the answers would differ based on people’s ethnic backgrounds. And if you took “Afro-Caribbean” out of that I’d find it non-controversial.

But he was Tony Blair’s minister for Europe from 2002 until the general election in 2005…

Et alors? It calls Mark Twain to mind. “Suppose I was an idiot, and suppose I was a member of Congress – but I repeat myself.”

Years ago I went out with a young woman who was on the game. She was very attractive, very bubbly and highly sexed.

Her attitude to her job was one of simple economics – she could earn more money in a couple of hours work in one day than she could have done by working all day every day in a low paid job such as cleaning.

She had no problems with her work and enjoyed it. I on the other hand found it too difficult to handle emotionally – she was clearly a lot tougher than me, as were her friends, many of whom became friends of mine.

She ended up studying veterinary medicine, and the last thing I heard of her was that she had her own practice.

Me? I’m still unemployed.

As for MacShane and MacTaggart, they really should find out what they’re talking about before opening their mouths – that’d be a really radical thing for a British politician to do.

@24: “Her attitude to her job was one of simple economics – she could earn more money in a couple of hours work in one day than she could have done by working all day every day in a low paid job such as cleaning.”

That assessment converges with what comes from: Confessions of a Working Girl, by Miss S (Penguin Books, 2007) who figured that working part-time in the local massage parlour – a thin camouflage for what went on – just down the road from her student digs was an efficient way to pay for her higher education.

The highly readable book – which verges on a practitioner’s handbook or helpful operating manual in places – was another means of exploiting the ensuing business opportunites. The impression of this reader was that of a young women with an analytical business mindset who enjoyed her part-time job and the income that job generated.

IMO it’s worth dipping into: A Theory of Prostitution, linked @13 for insights into prostitution as a regular business line, which seems to accord with the considerations that motivated 8 European governments to legalise the trade.

Btw there is a significance to that academic paper being published in the Journal of Political Economy, a respected academic journal which tends to reflect the interests and methodology of the Chicago school of economics. The paper claims to be an extension of the analysis of Nobel laureate Gary Becker in his papers: A Theory of Marriage Pt I and Pt II:
http://dinhvutrangngan.com/teaching/Social_Economics/Marriage/Becker_1973.pdf
http://dinhvutrangngan.com/teaching/Social_Economics/Marriage/Becker_1974.pdf

26. Charlieman

@24. Geezer: “Her attitude to her job was one of simple economics – she could earn more money in a couple of hours work in one day than she could have done by working all day every day in a low paid job such as cleaning.”

Good economics. An alternative economic model is to pretend to have been a high class hooker.

The high brow press will pay more for a story from a “hooker” than a plain journalist.

A possibly unintended downstream consequence of the acquittal in 1960 of the prosecution of Penguin Books for publishing Lady Chatterley’s Lover seems to have been that it now verging on impossible to prosecute anyone for publishing accounts, real or imagined, about sex.

The chief prosecutor in the trial, Mervyn Griffith-Jones, asked if it were the kind of book “you would wish your wife or servants to read”? The response of the trial jury suggested that they had absolutely no objection to either or both reading the book.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady_Chatterley's_Lover

Btw for removal of any doubt, a Conservative government was in power in 1960 – a Labour government wasn’t in office until the autumn of 1964 so the Conservatives had ample time to legislate to reverse the trial verdict. Roy Jenkins has been made a scapegoat for the permissive society.

The (impractical) proposal made in 2007 by Harriet Harman, then Commons Leader, that the law should be changed to make it illegal to pay for sex seems to have vapourised.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/7153358.stm

28. Charlieman

Nice try, Bob, but you didn’t hit the button that wins a prize.

@28: “Nice try, Bob, but you didn’t hit the button that wins a prize.”

I’m undisturbed by that prospect since my concern was only to establish the facts.

The evidence for the booming markets for brothels and prostitutes is clearly there in both the mass media and academic publications – which is probably just one among several reasons that Harriet Harmen’s proposal to ban payment for sex has disappeared.

It remains to be seen whether women students respond to the hike in university tutorial fees by resorting to the means that Dr Brooke Magnanti and Miss S adopted to finance their higher education.

30. Charlieman

@27. Bob B: Even high class hookers lie.

@30: “Bob B: Even high class hookers lie.”

And virtue is good and vice is wicked. So what?

The accumulating evidence from many different sources, including mass media and academic papers as well as testimony at trials for brothel keeping in America and France through to local press reports and current internet promotions for local massage parlours and escort services, supports an assessment that the markets for brothel services and prostitutes are booming. I’ve no vested interest in this either way, political or otherwise, so I’ll go with the evidence.

As for the London scene, try this report by the BBC from a few years back:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7597232.stm

The facts are that 8 European governments have formally legalised prostitution and that Harriet Harman’s impractical proposal to ban payment for sex made no headway.

32. Norwegian Guy

There is also an increasing number of countries that are not legalising prostitution, but are rather criminalising the purchase of sex. Sweden was the first, then Norway, and most recently Iceland followed this trend. The issue has also been raised in France. There’s nothing particularly impractical with it, and there is no reason why it couldn’t be done in Britain as well. See:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2010/jul/02/prostitution-legalise-criminalise-swedish-law

“There is also an increasing number of countries that are not legalising prostitution, but are rather criminalising the purchase of sex. ”

Try: Diamonds are a girl’s best friend:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PluRW3_FEt0

Criminalising the purchase of sex means lots of police women will need to be trained up for entrapment skills in order to capture unwary males.

Denis MacShane MP has now accepted he made a mistake.

That’s a rather ‘generous’ reading of the comment he posted.


Reactions: Twitter, blogs
  1. Liberal Conspiracy

    Dozens of academics accuse Denis MacShane MP of maligning teacher in Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  2. John West

    Dozens of academics accuse Denis MacShane MP of maligning teacher in Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  3. John West

    RT @libcon Dozens of academics accuse Denis MacShane MP of maligning teacher in Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA < dreadful, low stuff this

  4. Brit Lefit

    He'll attack Hamas 2get sympath
    RT @libcon:Dozens of academics accuse Denis MacShane MP of maligning teacher in Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  5. Naadir Jeewa

    Seriously, I wish Denis MacShane well in his new career working for Andrew Breitbart: http://bit.ly/mfmiw3 #expeldenismacshane

  6. Chris Bertram

    Dozens of academics accuse Denis MacShane MP of maligning teacher in Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  7. Ian 'Cat' Vincent

    Academics say Labour MP maligned teacher’s work
    http://bit.ly/ko7TcL #trafficking

  8. Emily Robinson

    Dozens of academics accuse Denis MacShane MP of maligning teacher in Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  9. sunny hundal

    Labour MP Denis MacShane accused by dozens of academics of maligning a respected teacher in Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  10. jma

    sometimes the stupidity of our elected representatives is astounding http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  11. Robert Morgan

    Labour MP Denis MacShane is a fucking idiot. “@libcon: Dozens of academics accuse MP of maligning teacher in Commons http://t.co/Vl9Ff88”

  12. eleanor

    Labour MP Denis MacShane accused by dozens of academics of maligning a respected teacher in Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  13. Johanna Anderson

    astonishing! RT@sunny_hundal Lab MP MacShane accused by dozens of academics of maligning a respected teacher in Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  14. Steve Hewitt

    Labour MP Denis MacShane accused by dozens of academics of maligning a respected teacher in Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  15. Master Copy

    It amazes me how much MPs experienced in public speaking can have such a poor grasp of rhetoric http://bit.ly/iQgcbA (libcon alert)

  16. Chris Paul

    Labour MP Denis MacShane accused by dozens of academics of maligning a respected teacher in Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  17. Ian Bowns

    MT @sunny_hundal: Labour MP Denis MacShane accused of maligning respected teacher http://bit.ly/iQgcbA <Any comment @DenisMacShane?

  18. Harry Cole

    Dozens of academics accuse Denis MacShane MP of maligning teacher in Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  19. KateMaltby

    Dozens of academics accuse Denis MacShane MP of maligning teacher in Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  20. ANTOINETTE CONNAL

    Labour MP Denis MacShane accused by dozens of academics of maligning a respected teacher in Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  21. karl thompson

    Morons in the house-D.MacShane MP and F.Mactaggart MP demonstrate stupidity – Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/3JcLWJz via @libcon -

  22. Public University

    LSE Professor Anne Phillips smeared in Parliament by suspended Labour Party MP Denis MacShane http://bit.ly/jyqfQw

  23. Richard Hall

    LSE Professor Anne Phillips smeared in Parliament by suspended Labour Party MP Denis MacShane http://bit.ly/jyqfQw

  24. Gary Banham

    Dozens of academics accuse Denis MacShane MP of maligning teacher in Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  25. The Poisonous Drivel of Dr Denis MacShane MP « The Disorder Of Things

    […] (30 May): Happy to see that this issue has been picked up by Liberal Conspiracy, OpenDemocracy, Feminist Philosophers and others. There’s now a statement with signatures […]

  26. Steve Greer

    Dozens of academics accuse Denis MacShane MP of maligning teacher in Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  27. matthewward

    RT @public_uni LSE Professor Anne Phillips smeared in Parliament by suspended Labour Party MP Denis MacShane http://bit.ly/jyqfQw

  28. andrew

    Academics says Labour MP maligned teacher | Liberal Conspiracy: The independent* Labour MP Denis MacShane is har… http://bit.ly/j2Cz2C

  29. Andy Hayden

    Dozens of academics accuse Denis MacShane MP of maligning teacher in Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  30. sunny hundal

    So @DenisMacShane care to explain why you maligned a teacher without reason? http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  31. Ben

    So @DenisMacShane care to explain why you maligned a teacher without reason? http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  32. Derek Bryant

    So @DenisMacShane care to explain why you maligned a teacher without reason? http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  33. Greg Callus

    So @DenisMacShane care to explain why you maligned a teacher without reason? http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  34. Harry Cole

    So @DenisMacShane care to explain why you maligned a teacher without reason? http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  35. James Ball

    Most disturbing thing about MacShane's outburst (and Mactaggart's response) is the inability to identify an essay q. http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  36. alan edwards

    RT @sunny_hundal: So @DenisMacShane care to explain why you maligned a teacher without reason? http://bit.ly/iQgcbA Cos he's an (nearex) MP?

  37. Michael Shilliday

    So @DenisMacShane care to explain why you maligned a teacher without reason? http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  38. Owen Jones

    Will @DenisMacShane apologise to the teacher he outrageously smeared? http://bit.ly/iQgcbA (via @sunny_hundal)

  39. Mark Carrigan

    Will @DenisMacShane apologise to the teacher he outrageously smeared? http://bit.ly/iQgcbA (via @sunny_hundal)

  40. FromTheSham

    So @DenisMacShane care to explain why you maligned a teacher without reason? http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  41. Colm Quinn

    “@sunny_hundal: So @DenisMacShane care to explain why you maligned a teacher without reason? http://t.co/fx3us0C” should be in prison anyway

  42. Hannah Pini

    If MPs can't tell the difference between an essay problem & an assertion of belief, how can we trust them to legislate? http://bit.ly/l4JbN3

  43. askhow

    Academics says Labour MP maligned teacher | Liberal Conspiracy http://bit.ly/mTDyP6 via @pryourblog

  44. nessa

    So @DenisMacShane care to explain why you maligned a teacher without reason? http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  45. Nemesis Republic

    RT @OwenJones84: Will @DenisMacShane apologise to the teacher he outrageously smeared? http://bit.ly/iQgcbA (via @sunny_hundal)

  46. NotaSheep MaybeaGoat

    "If MPs can't tell difference between essay problem & assertion of belief how can trust them to legislate effectively?" http://goo.gl/b1wQN

  47. Catherine Feely

    Most disturbing thing about MacShane's outburst (and Mactaggart's response) is the inability to identify an essay q. http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  48. Kevin Davidson

    So @DenisMacShane care to explain why you maligned a teacher without reason? http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  49. Martin O'Neill

    Will @DenisMacShane apologise to the teacher he outrageously smeared? http://bit.ly/iQgcbA (via @sunny_hundal)

  50. Kirstin Donaldson

    Dozens of academics accuse Denis MacShane MP of maligning teacher in Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  51. Liberal Conspiracy

    Success! Denis MacShane MP admits he made a mistake in maligning teacher in the Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA (see update)

  52. Brit Lefit

    Shite!
    RT @libcon: Success! Denis MacShane MP admits he made a mistake in maligning teacher in the Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA (see update)

  53. Rachel Gibbons

    Couldn't be a more graceless unabashed response … Update parag from @libcon on Denis MacShane's maligning Prof in HoC http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  54. Gavin Lingiah

    RT @libcon: Denis MacShane admits mistake in maligning teacher http://bit.ly/iQgcbA <<Pleased academics responded to this nonsense

  55. Spa Youth

    Success! Denis MacShane MP admits he made a mistake in maligning teacher in the Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA (see update)

  56. Stuart White

    Success! Denis MacShane MP admits he made a mistake in maligning teacher in the Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA (see update)

  57. Jon Stone

    It's a shame that Labour MPs can't spot a reference to the commodification of labour when it hits them in the face http://bit.ly/l5gReL

  58. Lucy Fur

    It's a shame that Labour MPs can't spot a reference to the commodification of labour when it hits them in the face http://bit.ly/l5gReL

  59. Thom Brooks

    So @DenisMacShane care to explain why you maligned a teacher without reason? http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  60. Daniel Pitt

    Denis MacShane MP admits he made a mistake in maligning teacher in the Commons http://bit.ly/iQgcbA

  61. Rotherham Politics

    Denis MacShane – Academics says Labour MP maligned teacher | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/1oE27ky via @libcon

  62. Seen elsewhere – Academics says Denis MacShane MP maligned teacher | Rotherham Politics

    […] He is accused of using the Parliamentary platform “to traduce the reputation of a teacher”, in a debate in the House of Commons on Human Trafficking…… Read on. […]

  63. Jon Wilson

    If you need reassuring that Denis MacShane won't be a loss, read this: http://t.co/WUiMK1GB

  64. Bryn Phillips

    If you need reassuring that Denis MacShane won't be a loss, read this: http://t.co/WUiMK1GB

  65. Sonia Sodha

    If you need reassuring that Denis MacShane won't be a loss, read this: http://t.co/WUiMK1GB

  66. Tom Gann

    Reminder MacShane is an unpleasant anti-intellectual coward. http://t.co/kjSWsQSq

  67. Chris Brooke

    If you need reassuring that Denis MacShane won't be a loss, read this: http://t.co/WUiMK1GB

  68. Palash Dave

    If you need reassuring that Denis MacShane won't be a loss, read this: http://t.co/WUiMK1GB

  69. Charlie Whitaker

    If you need reassuring that Denis MacShane won't be a loss, read this: http://t.co/WUiMK1GB





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