Where To Buy Lamisil Antifungal Cream Clomid Get Prescription Actos 45 Mg Generic Cialis Professional Canada Pharmacy W Buy Orlistat Line

Govt blowing everything up, say NHS execs


3:26 pm - January 17th 2011

by Sunny Hundal    


      Share on Tumblr

The Times newspaper today published a letter by healthcare professionals who say that the government is not heeding to “warnings” about key proposals.

The letter (published below) says that the reforms are “extremely risky” and “potentially disastrous”.

One of the co-signatories: Phil Gray, chief executive of the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP), told Liberal Conspiracy today that the NHS was “not broken”.

These reforms have real potential to put patient care at risk and represent a massive gamble with the future of the NHS.

The government has no mandate for these reforms – it promised no top-down reform of the NHS and this cannot be sold as anything other than that.

The NHS is not broken. Waiting lists have been coming down and services are improving. Of course there is more to do but there has to be a better way than blowing everything up and starting again.

A recent survey by the Kings Fund and others show that the vast majority of GPs are sceptical or totally opposed to the reforms.

Though a minority of GPs are genuinely enthusiastic, most have signed up to the scheme so that they are not at the back of the queue for the changes being imposed because they will not want their patients to lose out.

The letter in the Times today

Dear Sir

Radical reform of the NHS in England is expected to come a major step closer this week, with publication of the Health and Social Care Bill. As unions and professional organisations representing the 1.3 million staff who make up the NHS, we are extremely concerned that the government is not heeding the warnings about key elements of the proposals. We recognise the need to provide NHS services more cost-effectively, but we believe this can and must be achieved without taking unnecessary risks and damaging care.

One of the major concerns, is the role that the NHS’ economic regulator, Monitor, will be given to ensure that any willing providers, including NHS and voluntary organisations, and commercial companies, are able to compete to provide all NHS services. In addition, the 2011/12 operating framework for the NHS, published last month, revealed that providers will be able to offer services to commissioners at less than the published mandatory tariff price.

There is clear evidence that price competition in healthcare is damaging. Research by economists at Imperial College shows that, following the introduction of competition in the NHS in the 1990s, under a system that allowed hospitals to negotiate prices, there was a fall in clinical quality. With scarce resources there is a serious danger that the focus will be on cost, not quality.

Enforced competition will also make it harder for NHS staff to work collaboratively in multi-disciplinary teams, across organisational boundaries, to create the integrated care pathways that patients want and need, and that will help make services more efficient.

Furthermore the sheer scale of the ambitious and costly reform programme, and the pace of change, whilst at the same time being tasked with making £20 billion of savings, is extremely risky and potentially disastrous.

Yours sincerely

Dr Hamish Meldrum, Chairman of Council, British Medical Association
Dr Peter Carter, Chief Executive and General Secretary, Royal College of Nursing
Karen Jennings, National Secretary Health, UNISON
Karen Reay, National Officer, Health, Unite the Union
Professor Cathy Warwick CBE, General Secretary, Royal College of Midwives
Phil Gray, Chief Executive, Chartered Society of Physiotherapy

Two weeks ago the Health Select Committee highlighted that the figures being quoted by the DH for what it will cost (1.7bn) is not the correct figure. In fact that was the figure provided by the previous government for the changes they were planning. The Health Select Committee say it will cost substantially more.

    Share on Tumblr   submit to reddit  


About the author
Sunny Hundal is editor of LC. Also: on Twitter, at Pickled Politics and Guardian CIF.
· Other posts by


Story Filed Under: News

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.


Reader comments


1. Stuart White

Meanwhile, the Muscular Dystrophy Campaign today repeated its warning that the government has not yet explained how the reforms will work for people with rare and serious medical conditions like muscular dystrophy:

http://www.muscular-dystrophy.org/get_involved/campaigns/campaign_news/3194_key_questions_remain_unanswered_on_nhs_reforms

2. Dick the Prick

Dunno – they’re all union officials. There is a massive black hole in all of this. GPs must be laughing their heads off – a fantastic renegotiated contract a few years back so they now earn more than NHS consultants and now the ability to own NHS commissioning. Sometimes you just know when you’re gonna get shafted.

Kind of makes you wonder if Bevan achieved anything when Docs still run the show. They make the Bar Assoc look open and democratic.

Producers criticise challenge to producer interests.

Hold the front page!

4. Dick the Prick

@1 – the same applies to transgender stuff too from a previous thread. As a bit of politics, cronyism, deviance, slight of hand, duplicity and secrecy with governance structures (already complex) thrown out of the window – it’s kinda priceless.

As we know the UKs demographics are aging so by this move the Tories and Libbers (who need OAP votes more than Labour) wash their hands of older people health care – it’s fucking genius. Shame that it’s bollox but there be votes in them there clinics that need bullshitting.

@2

Kind of makes you wonder if Bevan achieved anything when Docs still run the show. They make the Bar Assoc look open and democratic.

Have you been paying attention? Lansley/Cameron say that they want to put doctors in control. (Actually, as the recent announcement for NHS London – where commissioning for the entire city was handled over to KPMG – the plan is to hand control of the NHS over to the private sector.)

6. the a&e charge nurse

When D-Cam labelled the NHS ‘second-rate’ did he mean before or after Lansley’s back-of-a-fag-packet reform?
http://thejobbingdoctor.blogspot.com/2011/01/please-buy-this.html

“Two of the UK’s leading Medical Journals, the British Medical Journal and the Lancet, have attacked plans for radical NHS reforms following the announcement that the National Health Service (NHS) in England has set aside nearly £1.7 Billion this year for reorganisation. The figure represents more than seven times what the NHS aims to save on management costs from the reforms. Undoubtedly, a proportion of the fund will come from cuts made to hard pressed front line services”.
http://www.commonwealthcontractors.com/news.php?id=541

Who’d have though it – politicos pissing up billions on bureaucracy rather than funding clinical care for patients.

7. Dick the Prick

@5, yeah, which is exactly what Bevan smashed. The BMA nearly killed him. Back in 1948 there wasn’t really that much political desire for an NHS from either the voters or the Labour party and obviously the Tories were slightly opposed to it but Bevan err bullshitted the Docs as their intransigence, greed, arrogance and damned truculence nearly brought the show to an end. Now, as you rightly say, the NHS is just gonna be a label and the Docs win with earning potential off the charts. Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose.

I’m not happy with the NHS in its present format. I’m not a Tory, far from it, but the waste in the NHS is absurd and a lot of the money goes to bureaucrats and not medical assistance. I don’t want to protect the jobs of managers on 100k when the real workers are being paid peanuts or being laid off. Maybe the only option is to dismantle it and rebuild with minimal managerial oversight.

Let’s just look around the world at healthcare systems that work and try copying them? Although I suspect I am being too simplistic.

This isn’t the only thing The ConDem government have gone back on tonight: it has been reminded by Chuka Amunna that page 24 of the Coalition agreement says Primary Care Trusts are “champions for better treatment” – nine months later, these are being dissolved. [http://www.politicshome.com/uk/article/20724/whats_in_a_word%3F.html]

The Lie Dems could put a stop to all this, but they have decided to allow their leader to fuck everything up, in return for some tiny things that Lie Dems think are important.

Quite strange.

“Karen Jennings, National Secretary Health, UNISON
Karen Reay, National Officer, Health, Unite the Union”

Next.

@8. Rae Merrill

I’m not happy with the NHS in its present format. I’m not a Tory, far from it, but the waste in the NHS is absurd and a lot of the money goes to bureaucrats and not medical assistance.

Interestingly, the last time I was waiting to see a consultant at my local hospital the guy next to me said the same thing. I asked him to tell me where all the bureaucrats were, after all we were sitting in the hospital by his measure we should not be able to move without bumping into a gaggle of them. Are there too many receptionists, too many people handling records, appointments, purchasing medicines? No, no, no, he said they are needed. So who then, I said? Higher up, the managers, he said. Oh I said, please give me their names, you see, I sit on the governing body of the hospital and if there is a manager who is not doing their job I will give their name to the chief exec and get them disciplined or sacked. He shut up.

That fact is that usually when people bring up the “too many bureaucrats” argument it is because they know fuckall about how a hospital is run and the solution would bring the hospital to a halt and threaten people’s lives. But I will give you the benefit of the doubt and ask you to list for me the bureaucrats you want to get rid of.

I don’t want to protect the jobs of managers on 100k when the real workers are being paid peanuts or being laid off. Maybe the only option is to dismantle it and rebuild with minimal managerial oversight.

Have you noticed that management is supposed to be cut by 45% and administration by 30% yet there are supposed to be “no front line cuts”. So what evidence do you have that 100k managers will be protected when “real workers” won’t? It certainly sounds like the opposite is more likely (though the RCN says that Lansley will be responsible for the loss of 27,000 nurses this year).

Incidentally here are some figures. In 1986 there were 1000 managers in the NHS in England, in 1996 there were 26,000. What happened in between? The internal market. If you hate bureaucracy then the solution is there: get rid of the internal market. What is Lansley doing? He is extending the the “internal market” and turning it into a competitive market. Administration in the US (where there is a competitive healthcare market) is in the region of 35%. Management costs the NHS in the region of 2%. If you hate administration/bureaucrats/management then you have to be against Lansley’s re-organisation.

Of course this has nothing to do with all those foreign private corporations which the tories have taken so much money from who just can’t wait to take over the NHS.

Funny how tory trolls care more about foreign corporations than British union members. And they call themselves patriotic. Priceless.

To say – as Cameron does – that the NHS needs reform, which it does, is one thing.

To claim that the NHS really needs this particular (costly) restructuring upheaval is an entirely different issue.

The focus is on transferring responsibility for commissioning treatments from the Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) to consortia managed by GPs. By many reports the emerging consortia are hiring staff now leaving the PCTs in droves and hiving off commissioning management to external service providers. Will administration costs really fall?

But we are overlooking that the PCTs had other functions besides commissioning treatments. They provided a patients liaison service, mediated disputes between patients and GPs and patients and hospitals and, importantly, monitored the treatment outcomes for patients – which is how we got to know about the relatively high rate of diabetes-related amputations in Devon and Cornwall. Who or what will undertake these functions when PCTs are gone?

@14 Sally,

Would you mind providing a list of all of these foreign private corporations the tories have taken so much money from that just can’t wait to take over the NHS?

17. the a&e charge nurse

[16] “Some GPs are said to be keen to take on commissioning. But the work involved is essentially commercial, not medical.
The new consortia will have to employ large teams of administrators, lawyers and others to negotiate, make contracts, monitor performance, send out bills, do audits, deal with disputes, and so on – as PCTs are already doing.
That is the first big deception involved in this change. It sounds as if GPs will be doing the work, when in fact the essential job of buying hospital and other services involves a vast range of tasks that practising GPs can’t possibly do, and aren’t trained to do – even if they decided to stop treating patients altogether.

In fact, the work calls for skills developed in the managed care industry in the US”.

The earlier attempt to encourage GPs to take on commissioning roles through ‘practice-based commissioning’ has been widely acknowledged to be a failure, mainly because most doctors prefer to focus on patients. This allows the 14 major US and UK health corporations, consultancy firms and insurers that currently make up the ‘Framework for Procuring External Support for Commissioning’ (FESC) to step in and play an increasingly central role in allocating the bulk of NHS finances. The FESC functions include population risk assessment, procurement and performance management, and data harvesting – but it is in service redesign that their impact will be most felt.

So who are these companies?

Aetna (US); Axa PPP (UK); BUPA (UK); CHKS (UK); Dr Foster (UK); Health DialogServices Corporation (US); Humana (US); KPMG LLP (US); McKesson (US); McKinsey (US); Navigant Consulting (US);Tribal (UK); UnitedHealth Europe (US); and WG Consulting (UK).

http://www.redpepper.org.uk/Dismantling-the-NHS/

What stands out a mile in the comments of the OP is the gulf between the ideas and opinions of people within the health service compared to those who feel free to air their opinions no matter what.

In this and other NHS-related OPs we have had brilliant contributions from health service employees. Direct experience, not just half-baked opinions based on bad journalism and prejudice.

I know who I believe and I am worried and angry.

Put directly and simply, we are being conned into believing that the abolition of the PCTs and transferring responsibility for treatment commissioning to GP managed consortia is the way to reform the NHS – when the practitioners are saying the resulting upheaval will be costly and carries risks for the future delivery of quality care to patients while the upheaval is sorted out.

We need a special health warning on the reforms: This is not a time to fall sick.

@17

Couldnt agree more. Top layers of management are where the main cuts are going to save money. GP’s do not have the expertise to manage consortia they will need to employ poeple with the know how, now where on earth could they be found? Doh!

I dont mind paying taxes that everyone benefits from but I begrudge paying taxes for weapons that kill and maim thousands. Slash the defence budget and spend, wisely, on the NHS. But then again our millionaire cabinet have forunes invested in the ever lucrative arms trade so I wont hold my breath?

No, I can’t because political parties are very good at hiding where they get their money from.

So your posts are full of totally unsubstaintiated bullshit claims. What a surprise.

23. the a&e charge nurse

[22] that’s a bit unfair Fungus – there have been several media reports of US health giants circling the NHS
http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2010/jul/16/nhs-outsourcing-private-health-firms

Are the actual names of the firms that important?

23 Exactly.

But the troll is too stupid to do a bit of investigating. Trolls just take their orders from their masters. They never question.

So you have an article which names one foreign company which may be interested. The implication made in Sally’s post was that forign companies have donated loads of money to the Tories and in exchange the Tories are going to get them work.

Any evidence of donations to the Tories from this companies?

Surely someone who makes such a claim on a message board should be able to provide a list of companies to back up their claim?

To make an accusation like that and then when challenged admit that they cannot back up their claim is just pathetic. Why should anyone take any notice of anything you claim?

26. the a&e charge nurse

[25] x8 US firms are cited at [17].

Sites like ‘corporate watch’ have been monitoring these developments over a number of years
http://www.corporatewatch.org/?lid=2382

Allyson Pollock is an authority on this matter
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2010/jul/09/nhs-plans-gps-corporate-healthcare

Fungus maybe this report from your beloved DM will help?

“The Tories’ health spokesman is being bankrolled by the head of a major contractor to the NHS.
Andrew Lansley accepted a £21,000 donation for his private office from John Nash, chairman of Care UK.
Last night he was accused of conflict of interest because Care UK makes 96 per cent of its money from the NHS.”

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1243579/Andrew-Lansley-embroiled-cash-influence-row-accepting-21-000-donation-Care-UK-chairman-John-Nash.html#ixzz1BKiU7tKv

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1243579/Andrew-Lansley-embroiled-cash-influence-row-accepting-21-000-donation-Care-UK-chairman-John-Nash.html#ixzz1BKi6vQWb

28. alienfromzog

Richard Blogger wrote:

Incidentally here are some figures. In 1986 there were 1000 managers in the NHS in England, in 1996 there were 26,000. What happened in between? The internal market. If you hate bureaucracy then the solution is there: get rid of the internal market. What is Lansley doing? He is extending the the “internal market” and turning it into a competitive market. Administration in the US (where there is a competitive healthcare market) is in the region of 35%. Management costs the NHS in the region of 2%. If you hate administration/bureaucrats/management then you have to be against Lansley’s re-organisation.

That’s a very salient point. Similarly in 2009 there were 42,509 mangers and senior managers – Up from the 23,378 in 1999. So that’s an 82% increase. But managers still make up less than 4% of the total number of NHS staff. The number of nurses has increased from 261,340 to 336,007 (29% increase) and the number of doctors from 88,693 to 132,683 (50% increase). (All figures are whole-time equivalents). [Source The King’s Fund]

Interestingly the NHS confederation pointed out in 2007 that the proportion of staff that are managers is extremly low (across the entire UK workforce it is 16%). Certainly my experience as a clinician is that most of the ineffeciency I see in the NHS is due to under-management. I’m not arguing for an increase in managers necessarily, I just think we should actually look at these things properly and decide what works and what doesn’t. Often appointing so-called bureaucrats frees up clinicians to do patient care.

The NHS is not perfect – whoever said it was, but it is far better than its critics will have you believe. Although actually, that’s slightly beside the point. The point really is that the reforms the government seems desperate to push through are going to make things significantly worse. I pray that I am wrong.

The Independent website has the story of the PM calling the NHS ‘second rate.’ There are lots of comments from people agreeing with him in the comments section. But this isn’t actually really relevant, because even if they’re right, that doesn’t make the government plans sensible. There is a subtle shifting of the argument going on by the government: They have put forward these proposals which – almost without exception – everyone who knows anything about the NHS points out will make things worse. So they shift the argument to “Ahh, but they’re necessary because the NHS is so bad….” Which, is of course nonsense. Even if you accept the premise (which I don’t) it’s still a ridiculous argument because there is no way, in which these reforms will help.

Dr AFZ BSc(Hons) MBChB MRCS(Ed) DCH

@28

Well said Doc. If DC siad the moon was made of cheese I think there are people out there who would accept that without challenge and then try to convince evryone else of the same arguement?

@28: ” Certainly my experience as a clinician is that most of the ineffeciency I see in the NHS is due to under-management.”

In my recurring experience in recent years as an NHS patient, I’ve an impression of shambolic low-level NHS administration due to a pervasive couldn’t-care-less attitude for good management practice – a claim I can support with many examples. Sadly, media reports of the increasing scale of medical errors, which previously occasioned shocked surprise, have gained the status of normality:

“At least 100 patients are dying or suffering serious harm each year after healthcare workers give them the wrong medication. The number of alerts relating to errors or ‘near-misses’ in the supply or prescription of medicines has more than doubled in two years, the National Patient Safety Agency said.

“More than 86,000 incidents regarding medication were reported in 2007, compared with 64,678 in 2006 and 36,335 in 2005. The figures, for England and Wales, show that in 96 per cent of cases the incidents caused ‘no or low harm’, but at least 100 were known to have resulted in serious harm or death.”
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/health/article6820090.ece

“Accidents, errors and mishaps in hospital affect as many as one in 10 in-patients, claim researchers. The report in the journal Quality and Safety in Health Care said up to half of these were preventable.

“Checks on 1,000 cases in just one hospital found examples of fatal surgical errors, infections and drug complications.”
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7116711.stm

I suspect one of the causes is that the NHS is simply too big so individuals have come to feel a disconnection between what they do and the downstream consequences.

I’m really not qualified to comment on how the NHS is run (although both my parents worked for it so I should be better informed) but I am particularly struck by how Cameron keeps going on about it being a “once in a lifetime opportunity.”

Call me crazy but if we genuinely are in the midst of a deep economic crisis then maybe now is not the time for radical restructuring.

It’s a bit like saying “OK, the house is on fire. Let’s redecorate!”

32. alienfromzog

@30, Bob B

Sadly, media reports of the increasing scale of medical errors, which previously occasioned shocked surprise, have gained the status of normality:

This is just ridiculous. Media reports have continued to sensationalize medical-errors. Those figures are entirely meaningless without any context. Do you have any conception of how much activity there is in the NHS?

Do errors occur in hospitals?
Yes, obviously
Do some of these errors result in harm to patients?
Unfortunately yes.

However, and here’s the key point, there is no healthcare system anywhere in the world that is error-free, nor is there ever likely to be one – for obvious reasons. So a more pertinent question is this: are there more errors in the NHS than you would expect for the amount of activity? Please show me some evidence for this. The link to the BBC story includes a quote from the report author:

“The rates we found do not show that the NHS is faring worse – this is an international issue, and other countries have similar or worse rates”

Professor Trevor Sheldon
University of York

Please show me how the reorganisation that is being inflicted on the NHS is going to help. Especially as trusts will be forced to compete on cost and hence quality is likely to suffer. Anyway, I’m not really sure how any of those examples are really relevant to this debate.

I suspect one of the causes is that the NHS is simply too big so individuals have come to feel a disconnection between what they do and the downstream consequences.

Do you have any idea of the processes that exist across the NHS to recognise and respond to errors? No? I thought not. Have you read the patient safety agency report about this and how they think the difference is mainly due to better reporting? No? I thought not.

Let me share something with you about drug errors. You will be very hard-pressed to find a doctor who’s never made one. I have. And we all pray that when we do make mistakes that no harm will come to the patient. That is inevitable in healthcare. You cannot remove the human element from what we do – especially in surgery; it is a skilled process that cannot be replicated any other way. Your statement makes no sense – you were complaining about clinical errors. There is no way that I am disconnected from my patients.

AFZ

@32: “Please show me how the reorganisation that is being inflicted on the NHS is going to help.”

Do try to keep up. My posts here @15 and many previous threads have made it very clear that I’m a thorough sceptic about the government’s proposed reforms. It’s one thing to say that the NHS needs reform and quite another to say it needs the upheaval as proposed.

“Do you have any idea of the processes that exist across the NHS to recognise and respond to errors? No? I thought not. Have you read the patient safety agency report about this and how they think the difference is mainly due to better reporting? No? I thought not.”

You’re being patronising. I had an elective operation on 14 October last year. As per the prescribed official protocol, just prior to the operation the surgeon presented me with a consent form to sign. On the form was the WRONG operation – the form had to be corrected in manuscript before I would sign. That experience hardly engendered confidence in NHS administration.

To get approval for the operation, I had a hospital appointment to see a consultant on 19 May so I ring up the hospital clinic on 17 May to confirm the appointment and to seek directions as to where exactly I should go. All is fine. On the morning of 19 May, two days later, I received a letter by first class post cancelling the appointment that afternoon and setting a new date: 23 June. The post where I live arrives late but fortunately I was in when the cancellation letter arrived.

At the beginning of June, about a fortnight after 19 May, I received a letter from NHS Choose & Book offering me an appointment to see a consultant. I phone them to tell them that I have an appointment for 23 June. They say they have no record of that. I’m worried in case the new appointment has been cancelled and I need this operation so I try – with difficulty – to quickly make contact with the hospital clinic to inquire whether I still have an appointment for 23 June. Eventually, I get to the correct clinic receptionist and they confirm that I do. I request that they inform NHS Choose & Book.

In due course, I attend for the appointment on 23 June and my operation is authorised. The day after, I receive a letter from NHS Choose & Book offering to book me an appointment to see a consultant so I phone them to tell them that I had an appointment the previous day. This is evidently news to Choose & Book. They asked whether I had kept the appointment so I confirmed that I had so they said they would make arrangements to stop sending me letters offering me appointments. That worries me in case I need another appointment.

As posted before, I had a letter from the Pathology Department of my local hospital in August 2007 asking me to return so they could take another blood sample as insufficient blood was taken at my “recent” test. The “recent” test was, in fact, in April. It took the Pathology Department from April to August to recognise that they had taken insufficient blood for the tests requested by my GP. Fortunately, the test wasn’t critical.

I could go on with many more examples of my experience and that of friends and the correspondence generated – fortunately, as a retired civil servant, I’m reasonably literate and articulate but that’s not true of many patients.

IMO for a clinician you are very poor at effective debating with other professionals.

BB

Methinks Cameron speaks with forked tongue:

“Cameron attacks Thatcher for failing to ‘respect’ public sector as he seeks third way on reform”
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1348034/Cameron-attacks-Margaret-Thatcher-failing-respect-public-sector.html?ITO=1490

“Britain is back open for business: Cameron evokes Thatcher spirit as he vows to rescue battered economy”
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1282205/Cameron-pledges-taxes-low-vows-turn-round-Britains-battered-economy.html

The only people who really can put a stop to this are the people who work in the NHS. They are the people who know what they are doing. If it is wrong what Cameron is trying to do then they must stop it.

@35: “They are the people who know what they are doing. If it is wrong what Cameron is trying to do then they must stop it.”

The law is the law and government administration controls where the NHS funding for treatments goes. By many reports, the existing staff of Primary Care Trusts are already leaving in droves to the extent where there are increasing concerns about treatment commissioning during the transition period until the new GP-managed commissioning consortia are up and running as well as with effective financial controls over due treatments payments and monitoring patient outcomes.

37. alienfromzog

@33

Do try to keep up. My posts here @15 and many previous threads have made it very clear that I’m a thorough sceptic about the government’s proposed reforms. It’s one thing to say that the NHS needs reform and quite another to say it needs the upheaval as proposed.

You’re being patronising. I had an elective operation on 14 October last year. As per the prescribed official protocol, just prior to the operation the surgeon presented me with a consent form to sign. On the form was the WRONG operation – the form had to be corrected in manuscript before I would sign. That experience hardly engendered confidence in NHS administration.

My apologies for patronising tone. My only defence is how strongly I feel about this. I did read your comments from above. However that still doesn’t explain how your complaints about NHS care – which I was trying to put into context – have any relevance to this particular debate about the government’s reform proposals.

As has been discussed before, your personal experience, whilst troubling to me – and clearly more so to you – is not the same thing as evidence. It is a statistical inevitability that I am aware of far more patients and what has happened to them than you are. And certainly what you are describing is rare.

I do not know the details of the choose and book system where you are, but it sounds like it doesn’t work. That’s fair comment but the important question is what to do about it? I would suggest that it needs fixing, that’s not the same as saying the entire NHS needs to be ripped up.

You complained of my patronising tone, for which I apologise. However you haven’t answered my point – which was that in order to come to any sensible conclusion about the errors and safety issues that you discussed, you have to put the reports in context. And even one of the references you used made the point that the adverse event incidence in the NHS was the same as most countries and better than some.

AFZ

@36 The law is the law.

How very authoritarian.

The law is what the people allow it to be.

Is there nothing that can be done through the courts to prevent this marketization of the NHS, this is happening without the consent of the public, I’m sure many deluded people who voted for them didn’t realise what parasites they were voting in and have been mislead by Cameron’s election promises. It’s fraud ffs, surely something can be done?

@31

“It’s a bit like saying “OK, the house is on fire. Let’s redecorate!””

YES. I am totally stealing that line 😉

@26 Thank you for pointing out to me that a large number of organisations wish to do work for the NHS if they are allowed to do so (surprise surprise). I have no problem with this, no doubt you do. However that is not the point of my original post. My concern was Sally’s insinuation that the Tories made policy in exchange for cash donations. If you can provide evidence that these companies you have mentioned have made donations to the Tories please do so.

@27 Thank you for providing a very interesting example. This strikes me as a clear conflict of interest and it is odd that it is allowed under the rules.

Although it is not an overseas private company as claimed by Sally and more importantly she could not provide this example in her post #21, in which she admits she has no evidence for her accusation. And she then compalins about some troll not being able to do any research.

Going off topic a bit, it does raise an interesting point about political donations – should any companies and business owners be allowed to donate to a political party? For that matter should unions as obviously they will also seek to influence policy.

Lastly it is a bit below the belt to accuse me of being a DM reader.

@37: “My apologies for patronising tone. My only defence is how strongly I feel about this. I did read your comments from above. However that still doesn’t explain how your complaints about NHS care – which I was trying to put into context – have any relevance to this particular debate about the government’s reform proposals.”

The relevance of my personal experience of shambolic NHS administration is to demonstrate the need for NHS reforms – and implicitly to also show that the government’s intended restructuring upheaval goes nowhere near addressing the problems of shambolic low-level administration – and btw from talking with friends of a similar age, my experience is not unusual.

How about a frail elderly lady who was sent for another angiogram, which showed nothing untoward (as many of her friends expected), before any healthcare professional thought of testing for anaemia, which showed that she is severely anaemic? I could say much more about personal experience of NHS administrative failings but the narrative would get long, complicated and boring.

The upheaval of abolishing the PCTs, introduced when the NHS is being expected to achieve “efficiency savings” over four years amounting to about 20% of the NHS annual budget, is a sure recipe for risking the quality of patient care – which is what is concerning so many healthcare professionals and, by the latest reports, MPs as well.

This is why I posted @19: “This is not a time to fall sick.”

Worth reflecting on the report in Monday’s press about the latest proposal for improving the dispensing of NHS healthcare:

From the health service that introduced NHS Direct call centres comes the latest ruse to prevent the sick from visiting their local GP: diagnosis by email.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-1349935/NHS-reform-GPs-diagnosis-email-deadly-gamble.html?ito=feeds-newsxml

Compare: “Up to 12 million working UK adults have the literacy skills expected of a primary school child, the Public Accounts Committee says. . . The report says there are up 12 million people holding down jobs with literacy skills and up to 16 million with numeracy skills at the level expected of children leaving primary school.”
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/4642396.stm


Reactions: Twitter, blogs
  1. Liberal Conspiracy

    NHS reforms: "government blowing everything up and starting again" http://bit.ly/ga2ffp

  2. Tweet4Labour

    RT @libcon: NHS reforms: "government blowing everything up and starting again" http://bit.ly/ga2ffp

  3. sunny hundal

    The govt is "blowing everything up and starting again" with NHS reforms say key professionals: http://bit.ly/ga2ffp

  4. Fenrir

    RT @sunny_hundal: The govt is "blowing everything up and starting again" with NHS reforms say key professionals: http://bit.ly/ga2ffp <<Good

  5. Swamp Thang

    RT @libcon: NHS reforms: "government blowing everything up and starting again" http://bit.ly/ga2ffp

  6. Tim Holmes

    RT @sunny_hundal: The govt is "blowing everything up and starting again" with NHS reforms say key professionals: http://bit.ly/ga2ffp

  7. Ian Adamson

    RT @sunny_hundal: The govt is "blowing everything up and starting again" with NHS reforms say key professionals: http://bit.ly/ga2ffp

  8. dolly daydream

    RT @libcon: NHS reforms: "government blowing everything up and starting again" http://bit.ly/ga2ffp

  9. Sian Davies

    RT @sunny_hundal: The govt is "blowing everything up and starting again" with NHS reforms say key professionals: http://bit.ly/ga2ffp

  10. Chris Keegan

    Shock news, Cameron destroys the NHS: 'And I'd do it again too even if there was no democratic mandate'… oh wait… http://bit.ly/gjojdw

  11. Carl Packman

    Govt “blowing everything up” say NHS professionals | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/BCfiQYE @libcon #twitterjoketrial Come friendly bombs…

  12. Curious Questioner

    RT @____chris_____: Shock news, Camron destroys NHS: '& I'd do it again 2 even with no democratic mandate'.. h wait.. http://bit.ly/gjojdw

  13. Ellie Mae

    EVERYONE READ THIS NOW #NHS http://t.co/bEigpyH

  14. Aisha Bushra

    RT @MissEllieMae: EVERYONE READ THIS NOW #NHS http://t.co/bEigpyH

  15. Peterward

    RT @MissEllieMae: EVERYONE READ THIS NOW #NHS http://t.co/bEigpyH

  16. Johnny Howorth

    RT @MissEllieMae: EVERYONE READ THIS NOW #NHS http://t.co/bEigpyH

  17. technicalslip

    RT @MissEllieMae: EVERYONE READ THIS NOW #NHS http://t.co/bEigpyH

  18. William Jones

    RT @MissEllieMae: EVERYONE READ THIS NOW #NHS http://t.co/bEigpyH

  19. Clarebella

    Govt blowing everything up, say NHS execs | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/zo9csUg via @libcon

  20. Bored London Gurl

    RT @MissEllieMae: EVERYONE READ THIS NOW #NHS http://t.co/bEigpyH

  21. Peter J Barnes

    RT @MissEllieMae: EVERYONE READ THIS NOW #NHS http://t.co/bEigpyH

  22. alneill

    Govt blowing everything up, say NHS execs | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/ylb2NIn via @libcon

  23. ABC

    RT @alneill: Govt blowing everything up, say NHS execs | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/ylb2NIn via @libcon

  24. Ken Coyne

    RT @MissEllieMae: EVERYONE READ THIS NOW #NHS http://t.co/bEigpyH

  25. Rocky Hamster

    RT @clarebellla: Govt blowing everything up, say NHS execs | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/zo9csUg via @libcon

  26. Wendy Maddox

    RT @libcon: Govt blowing everything up, say NHS execs http://bit.ly/ga2ffp

  27. Coalition Lies and the Corrosion of Politics « Bad Conscience

    […] to protect the NHS before the election. They are now instigating massive back-door changes. Changes described by “seriously concerned” leading healthcare experts as “unnecessary risks” which are […]

  28. Gavin Duley

    Govt blowing everything up, say #NHS execs — http://bit.ly/dSrRpU via @Guardian

  29. The sheer scale and breadth of Coalition u-turns is staggering | Liberal Conspiracy

    […] to protect the NHS before the election. They are now instigating massive back-door changes. Changes described by “seriously concerned” leading healthcare experts as “unnecessary risks” which are […]

  30. Rachel Hubbard

    Govt blowing everything up, say NHS execs | Liberal Conspiracy http://goo.gl/2q5qx

  31. Cross Blogination: The Big Society « Blog On The Motorway

    […] from the Thatcher era Conservatives) before this week announcing reforms to the whole of the NHS that have healthcare professionals “seriously concerned” about “unnecessary risks” which are “damaging” and “potentially […]





Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.