Buy Generic Abilify Online Cipro 750 Mg Fiyat Buy Bactrim Ds Buy Lasix Without A Prescription Mail Order Vytorin

Ed Miliband rebuffs AJ on 50p tax commitment


4:24 pm - November 15th 2010

by Sunny Hundal    


      Share on Tumblr

Labour leader Ed Miliband today rebuffed shadow chancellor Alan Johnson and said he was committed to the top-rate tax of 50p.

A spokesperson for his office said: “We remain committed to it for now and for the foreseeable future.”

The need for a statement was underscored when Alan Johnson, over the weekend, said he wanted to see the top rate of tax eventually dropped again.

He told The Times on Saturday:

I am only backing 50p for the times we are in. It is not ideal; five years ago (we) wouldn’t have done it. Our policy has to be based on fairness and what encourages people to do well.

On the BBC Politics Show yesterday he was asked by Jon Soppel:

Well I’ll tell you what – just so that people can compare and contrast and make their own judgement, your quote, “I’m only backing 50p tax rate for the times we were in,” yesterday and Ed Miliband, during the campaign, “I would keep the 50p rate permanently. It’s not about reducing the deficit, it’s about fairness in our society and that’s why I’d keep the 50p tax rate.” Had you spoken to him before you said that?

Alan Johnson replied:

Well, look, you have to separate what’s going on in a leadership contest where people say all kinds of things in terms of the cut and thrust of that campaign and where we stand now. I was also being asked my opinion on the 50p tax rate.

Today, Ed Miliband’s aides insist that reversing tax rises on the poorest was a bigger priority.

But some say his statement represents a shift from his earlier firm commitment.

A poll by YouGov for Sunday on Sunday found that a massive 77% of voters would “support increasing taxation on the very rich” to reduce income inequality between the richest and the poorest.

    Share on Tumblr   submit to reddit  


About the author
Sunny Hundal is editor of LC. Also: on Twitter, at Pickled Politics and Guardian CIF.
· Other posts by


Story Filed Under: News

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.


Reader comments


A poll by YouGov for Sunday on Sunday found that a massive 77% of voters would “support increasing taxation on the very rich” to reduce income inequality between the richest and the poorest.

Yet try making that the main plank of an election manifesto, and less than half that many will vote for you (statement based on recent election history in this country). One of those things where asking people what they would like without context produces a very different result from trying to persuade the electorate.

I would suggest that keeping a high tax rate as a point of principle is not a good message if you want to attract anything much beyond core Labour voters (I’m guessing that there is little to pick up from the Greens and BNP(the only other high-tax parties)) – saying you will review it is a much smarter move. But then again, Mr Johnson is probably a better politician than Mr Milliband.

I see the ghost of New Labour still haunts Mili Minor’s new gang.

How depressing.

How utterly predictable.

What New Labour wheeze is next to be “rehabilitated” I wonder?

1

“But then again, Mr Johnson is probably a better politician than Mr Milliband”

Please tell me you were damning with faint praise?!

Alan Johnson….. jeez, I wouldn’t put him in charge of a stall at a car boot sale, never mind the national economy.

Only a party as desperately short of ideas as it is of talent would think Johnson was a suitable cabinet member.

and less than half that many will vote for you (statement based on recent election history in this country

Errm what? That’s based on no evidence whatsoever. Polls have consistently shown support for higher taxes at the higher end.

Lefties: stop bloody fighting each other!

Galen10,

I did not say Mr Johnson was a good shadow cabinet minister, but a good player of political games. Mr Milliband (the man who wrote the last Labour manifesto remember) is seemingly less so – I have a soft spot for him after his travails at Copenhagen where his media interviews were so transparently honest and non-political, but the fact he was not playing the political game at his portfolio’s highest-profile event tells us a lot.

As leader he may therefore quite easily fall into the trap of setting ideas in stone that do not need to be so set – if you keep an idea flexible now, it allows you to react to something in the future much more easily. And a commitment to a top-tax rate of 50% is not a principle (redistributive taxation is, but this is about the figure, not the principle) so much as a silly way of handing a gift to your opponents.

Sunny,

Yes, and when did a party committed to higher taxation last win an election?

1974 I think – and I am not sure if Harold Wilson was committed to raising taxes then (what with not being able to remember that far back…).

Opinion polls tell you what people would like, but remember that if you take them as evidence that higher taxation would win votes, Phil Woolas was on the right track with immigration policy…

People vote for a number of reasons (or only one – because the right lizard has to win). The 77% who support higher taxation of the very rich will not automatically vote for this as it is not necessarily their number one priority. Plus, at an election, the other parties will by pointing out why this is purely stupid in terms of tax take. Opinion polls tell you what people think in response to questions, yes, but not how this will cause them to act in response to complicated situations.

“when did a party committed to higher taxation last win an election?”

In 1997 61% of people thought that Labour were going to put their taxes up. Polls also found that the Lib Dem penny on income tax was a popular policy.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/politics97/analysis/kellner.shtml

Don,

Great. But Labour said they were not going to put taxes up, so I bet most of that 61% actually voted for the other parties. Most Conservative supporters tend to assume that Labour will put taxes up for example.

And if the Liberal Democrat policy was so popular, why did they still not achieve a huge number of votes?

Is the forseeable future more or less than four years?

Sunny,

“Rebuffed”? You must be joking. Committed for the foreseeable future pretty weak. Ed M will drop the 50% tax rate pledge once the economy is properly recovered.

It may be a popular policy at this point in the economic cycle, but that is irrelevant in the long run. Johnson understands that and surely Ed M does too. Don’t you?

Jamie

And if the Liberal Democrat policy was so popular, why did they still not achieve a huge number of votes?

You’ll have to show that their popularity is everything to do with taxation and not a mix of policies

So here we have an originally working class ex-postie, thinking it would be a good way for Labour to be re-elected by wooing the middle/upper classes with lower taxation. And this at a time when the very class from which he originates is being systematically impoverished by the Condems.

The old adage of “pull up the ladder, Jack, I’m on board” still holds true in politics, doesn’t it, Alan.

For the sake of sanity, I do hope the party ditches this nincompoop Blairite, and sees that his way represents the signing of an electoral suicide pact that will see Labour annihilated in any future general election.

Ata time when the poor are being squeezed as never before, this is no time for Labour to worry about courting unpopularity with the electorate when the gap between rich and poor has increased to 18th century proportions.

For a politician to say they are ‘ committed ‘ to higher taxes is akin to the PR of British Gas saying they are committed to higher prices. The sensible thing to do is leave it vague with plenty of wiggle room. I am deeply unconvinced with opinion polls regarding tax rates. Most folks think those who earn less than them are lazy and did not make the most of their opportunities i.e. don’t deserve a tax cut. Those who earn more than them are overpaid and get undeserved wages i.e don’t deserve a tax cut. They on the other hand are in the squeezed middle i.e. do deserve a tax cut. However, nearly everyone thinks they are in the squeezed middle.

Bert,

“This is no time for Labour to worry about courting unpopularity with the electorate”

WTF? If Labour wants to get back into Government then it will rightly ignore your advice.

“this is no time for Labour to worry about courting unpopularity with the electorate ”

Classic.

Wow, AJ’s got some brains after all.

Put it up to 60p for middle earners and 90p for those in the upper bracket.

Rae,

I presume you want to lower the tax take then? Because that would achieve it quite nicely – as all high earners take advantage of the rest of the world, and the incentive drops to earn more for the rest of us.

Still, at least it is a good honest policy. Kind of like 1983 all over again?

Let’s not get carried away.

His aides may have said something but the Milliband Elect has yet to break his silence. This is part of the pattern that saw Aunties Diane and Harriet having to step in and do his job for him over the Woolas affair.

And what was the problem at PMQs today? Couldn’t they coax him out with biscuits or a promise of a go on an Xbox or something?

Oh well, I suppose the comrades know best. The polls seem to say that the less the public see of their Great Helmsman the better they do.

Might be an idea to hide him away permanantly. Labour party leaders always seem to do better when locked up in the attic like weird versons of Mrs Rochester.


Reactions: Twitter, blogs
  1. Liberal Conspiracy

    Ed Miliband rebuffs his chancellor on 50p tax commitment http://bit.ly/dilxs5

  2. Hazico_Jo

    RT @libcon: Ed Miliband rebuffs his chancellor on 50p tax commitment http://bit.ly/dilxs5

  3. Matt Jeffs

    RT @libcon: Ed Miliband rebuffs his chancellor on 50p tax commitment http://bit.ly/dilxs5

  4. Lee Hyde

    RT @libcon: Ed Miliband rebuffs his chancellor on 50p tax commitment http://bit.ly/dilxs5

  5. sunny hundal

    Twists & turns by Alan Johnson to defy Ed Miliband on 50p tax, despite massive public support for it http://bit.ly/dilxs5

  6. Nick H.

    RT @libcon: Ed Miliband rebuffs his chancellor on 50p tax commitment http://bit.ly/dilxs5

  7. Matthew McGregor

    Mind blowing quote from AJ. Could be paraphrased as "Yeah, but people say all kinds of nonsense during campaigns." http://bit.ly/bKbm6Z

  8. Malcolm Evison

    Ed Miliband rebuffs AJ on 50p tax commitment | Liberal Conspiracy http://goo.gl/pq2j8

  9. Press Not Sorry

    RT @sunny_hundal: Twists & turns by Alan Johnson to defy Ed Miliband on 50p tax, despite massive public support for it http://bit.ly/dilxs5

  10. Neil O'Brien

    I recon the Charismatic Former Postie (TM) is right about the 50p rate – Ed Miliband should listen to him: http://bit.ly/bj0OnC

  11. Andy S

    RT @sunny_hundal: Twists & turns by Alan Johnson to defy Ed Miliband on 50p tax, despite massive public support for it http://bit.ly/dilxs5

  12. Wendy Maddox

    RT @libcon: Ed Miliband rebuffs his chancellor on 50p tax commitment http://bit.ly/dilxs5

  13. Wendy Maddox

    RT @sunny_hundal: Twists & turns by Alan Johnson to defy Ed Miliband on 50p tax, despite massive public support for it http://bit.ly/dilxs5

  14. Bryonny G-H

    RT @libcon: Ed Miliband rebuffs AJ on 50p tax commitment http://bit.ly/dilxs5





Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.