The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave


9:11 am - November 11th 2010

by Sunny Hundal    


      Share on Tumblr

If you absorb the media today, the only story to report from yesterday is that “riots” took place and Tory staffers were bravely dealing with the German Luftwaffe some students prone to throwing things with “the Blitz spirit“.

Tories and Libdems might look at the papers and rejoice, but they would be wise to think twice. That generation of student’s isn’t going to forget this betrayal easily and in five years time they’ll be ready to punish both parties.

As I said earlier – there are reasons why the Tories failed to win an outright majority at the election, and much of that relates to the negative connotations it built up in the past. I’m glad they’re once again playing to the “nasty party” stereotype.


[illustration by @jeevanrai]

50,000 students was way more than anyone was expecting. It now means tuition fees are at the top of the political agenda.

There will be many more protests – small and large – over the Coalition’s policies. The more Tories and Libdems try and dismiss people who have concerns about their future, the more angry they will get.

This is just the start. This isn’t just about large, national protests – this should be a movement focused on targeted, local protests. I’m all in favour of the NUS ‘de-capitation’ strategy.

But we have to go further. A group of us, including Clifford Singer from MyDavidCameron and OtherTPA have been working on a website to do exactly that.

False Economy should be launched by the end of the month.

Our aim with the site is three-fold: to help people understand and note the scale of the Coalition’s cuts; to read about how those cuts are affecting people’s lives; to help organise and report on local campaigns against the cuts.

Some of those local campaigns have already sprung up: Oxford Save Our Services and Birmingham Budget Cuts are just two examples.

So let’s stop self-flagellating about the absolutely tiny minority of protesters who threw a few things yesterday. There are bigger issues and policies that the Coalition should be apologising for. We have to keep them in the defensive, not fall for their diversionary tactic.

Update: A nice video (via Natacha)

ConDemned To Debt: Demo against Tory Education Cuts from Anti Tory on Vimeo.

    Share on Tumblr   submit to reddit  


About the author
Sunny Hundal is editor of LC. Also: on Twitter, at Pickled Politics and Guardian CIF.
· Other posts by


Story Filed Under: Blog ,Fight the cuts

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.


Reader comments


[deleted]

Agreed, Sunny. The smaller protests are breaking out everywhere and they’re taking inspiration from the larger ones. They’re not all the stereotypes the media loves to focus on, either – just ordinary people who don’t want to live the lives that they’re being pushed towards.

3. astateofdenmark

Lucky nobody was killed by ”some students prone to throwing things”.

A single Google search turns up three other ‘national’ campaigns against the cuts:

http://www.coalitionofresistance.org.uk/
http://www.tuc.org.uk/theme/index.cfm?theme=alltogether
http://anticuts.com/

I know you chaps love collective action. Have you ever considered acting collectively?

what happened to this lot? I thought they were rather good

http://www.thecutswontwork.co.uk/

So let’s stop self-flagellating about the absolutely tiny minority of protesters

Nobody’s asking you to self-flagellate. Just condemn them outright and move on. You’re not responsible for all the crazies that turn up to your protests but you have to call them out as crazies and distance yourself from them. Your reaction so far has implied that you found the destruction all rather jolly and fun, which is despicable and is not going to help your cause.

How strange that right wingers don’t care if people are killed when our “heroes” invade and occupy foreign countries, but get all sensitive at the thought of people being killed during a demo. Killed otherwise than by the police, that is.

actually scratch that – I thought the website looked good, but the content is full of NEF garbage. I look forward to falseconomy.

Sunny

You a disgusting little hypocrite. Apart from the fact that Labour introduced UPFRONT tution fees (which I see you have no problem with, and no comment on), you seem to be against violence in all cases, apart from when it suits your aims. People were seriously hurt yesterday, and could have been more so.

I can just imagine your faux outrage if a march destroyed Labour HQ, a mosque or another one of your little socialist pets.

You really are a total disgrace. Right up there with Nick Griffn. You and your ilk and no better than the BNP.

@ 7 Briar

That would have been a LABOUR party government in charge when we invaded Iraq and Afghanistan?

[deleted]

I don’t recall Tories and assorted right-wingers wailing and moaning at protesters and readily condemning when the so-called Countryside Alliance invaded parliament not so long ago. Note the actual words: *Invaded parliament*.

@claude

Indeed! And when fathers4justice chucked a condom full of purple flour at Blair a few years back. Sure no-one was hurt but it could have been anthrax!!!1.[/sarc]

To people moaning about the students and/or anarchists, if the Met police can’t stop a few rowdy beardy-weirdy pot-noodle munchin’ lefties from entering Tory HQ what on earth are they doing? I bet the Chinese were giving Cameron some ideas at the time though….

html fail, sorry.

Wow, someone’s let the right wing dogs out.

Yes there were some vicious idiots throwing stuff from the roof. But the nutters who posted here trying to make out that one idiot characterises all the 50,000 is just plain daft. Anyone who has ever been on a demonstration will tell you that the vast majority of the march is good natured almost to the point of a carnival atmosphere. This is understandable because the marchers feel elated that there are other people who think the way they do.

But any is open. Anyone can join it. This is a freedom that we have (although, I suspect that May is looking at how to change that). The anarchists who smashed the windows and threw stuff from the roof are the usual suspects. And usually the police are competent enough to handle them. Yesterday the police showed their incompetence.

Let me give you an example. On Oct 3rd there was the Right to Work march in protest of the Tory conference in Brum. The West Midlands police had created a “security zone” around the ICC. This was nothing to do with “terrorism” and was there solely because of the march. (Later that day I walked along Broad Street right through the “security zone” and saw not a single police officer and was not stopped.) There were about 100 anarchists in a group on the march. They were intimidating because of the abuse they were shouting and because they all had their faces covered (I noticed that from the TV pictures there were many people with their faces covered smashing windows). I moved away from the anarchists towards the front of the march.

After the march I retraced my steps to get back to New Street station and saw what had happened to the anarchists. They had tried to move off the prescribed route (just like yesterday) but the competent West Midlands police had stopped this and “kettled” them, surrounding the group with police officers and police dogs.

Any march will have anarchists. By their nature, anarchists will try to cause trouble. It is the responsibility of the police to take action – as and when needed – to stop them causing trouble. Clearly the Met Police have a lot to learn from the West Midlands police. Incidentally, I talked to a police officer and found him very sympathetic to the Right to Work march: Theresa May’s cuts means that one in ten police officers will lose their jobs in the West Midlands.

‘@ 7 Briar

That would have been a LABOUR party government in charge when we invaded Iraq and Afghanistan?’

An invasion Sunny supported.

Anyway, good luck to the peaceful protestors and a fuck you very much to the minority of violent thugs who stole the headlines.

An educated population is an end in itself; education should be free, for all.

17. Luis Enrique

Everybody is a hypocrite in that they excuse violence when it’s in a cause they believe in, and object strenuously when it isn’t. Thankfully nobody was seriously hurt, but somebody could easily have been. If somebody had been seriously hurt in say the Countryside Alliance or Fathers4Justice, we’d react against that.

The question is: which causes are worthy of violence and which are not. I don’t think this issue was worth risking somebody having their head stoved in. At the same time, Sunny is probably right that the behaviour of a few idiots shouldn’t dominate the issue.

So to the OP. Yes, this is the start, but remember marches never change policy by themselves. The scenes yesterday will make most Tory MPs feel that they are right, and the LibDem MPs will harden their resolve hoping that the issues will go away. In that sense the march has failed, but then it could never “succeed”. What will change policy is people going to their MPs and councillors and saying “if you support this policy I will not vote for you”. Demonstrations highlight an issue, it makes people realise what the cause is about. But a demonstration can only be successful if voters are also given the nudge to go and complain to the politicians.

If the NUS want this protest to be successful they should get people in university areas to see their councillors and point out that they will not be re-elected in May next year if they support this policy. If at a LibDem council surgery *every* person was there to complain about the higher education policy, then they will soon get the message. If a whole swathe of LibDem councillors start to feel that their position is tenuous, then they will feed this back to their MPs and to the leadership. It is then that policy will change.

Our aim with the site is three-fold: to help people understand and note the scale of the Coalition’s cuts; to read about how those cuts are affecting people’s lives; to help organise and report on local campaigns against the cuts.

If it helps them understand there should be NO more rioting etc, if people READ and UNDERSTAND. However what I think you are suggesting is to LIE, DEFLECT, OBSCURE the truth so that dumb fools DON’T understand. This is what seesm at the ehart of the riots ysterday, so far NOT ASINGLE student has known what the full proposals are, all they know is the aprroted mantra “tripling tuition fees”, the fact that most of them wiull be netter off AND it is better for poorer students seems to have passed you by.

20. Luis Enrique

Shatterface

oh, I know what you mean and I sympathize but I can’t stop myself: education is not free. The question is how we pay for it.

Whether funding uni from general taxation is fair or unfair depends on the incidence of general taxation and the incidence of government spending. It’s perfectly possible to have a situation in which higher education is funded from general taxation to the great detriment of low income households who do not attend university – it could be extremely regressive.

Regrettably people appear to hold very strong views without ever having stopped to think about whether the current incidence of taxation and spending corresponds to a regressive of progressive way of funding university education.

my message 19…sorry for so many typos! D’oh.

22. John Meredith

Yes, I agree with Luis, of course education should be free, the trouble is it isn’t. And that takes us to square one.

I will laugh my nellies off when the student and lecturer population of Sheffield Hallam recall Clegg with his own legislation then kick him out!

It is such a shame the SWP and other tossers have to ruin the day. (maybe it was orcastrated by the Tories and thats why the police let it happen)

So far the protests have done nothing more but harden public opinion against the public workers and students, British people don’t like violence and attacking the police? Female officers! well that was bloody clever wasn’t it.

An educated population is an end in itself; education should be free, for all.

Primary and secondary IS FREE unless you prefer to pay private. Terciary was mainly free when only about 10% of students went on to UNI…and most passed and most didn’t drop out…now after Labour’s dire social engineering we have 40 or 50% and so to pay from general taxation is IMPOSSIBLE…that’s why LABOUR introduce tuition fees! aggghhh!!!

26. John Meredith

“Primary and secondary IS FREE unless you prefer to pay private.”

As per Luis above: no it isn’t. It is very, very expensive (and extremely wasteful). It helps to bear that in mind.

27. Luis Enrique

JM I’m not with you on the extremely wasteful

How very undemocratic y’alls have become now that political power has drained from your mighty fists of redistributative vengence. Poor “The Students” lost the argument and have now contrived to lose it some more. The next tidal wave Sunny? Nah, just death throes.
Ask the ex-miners and the ex-dockers. The political argument has been had and students are one of the lobby groups that lost.

Independent 22.10.07 –
Readers ask questions to Chris Huhne – includes this –

<>

The Indian Institute occupation involved breaking into a large building in the middle of Oxford.

You have the cheek to call the Tories the “nasty party” yet I don’t see an army of young Tories invading Labour HQ to the cheers of sympathetic onlookers.

The antics of the Bullingdon Club were of course disgusting but at least they attempted to pay for the damage. Will any of the violent protesters be coughing up?

31. John Meredith

“JM I’m not with you on the extremely wasteful”

Perhaps I should say ‘extremely wasteful in places’. There is no doubt that a large amount of education spending is spent on not educating.

The Chris Huhne quote from the Independent is this –

Did you smoke cannabis? And is it true that you were careful at Oxford never to be caught with a joint in a photograph? Riazat N by email.

I was not at all careful to avoid being in photos while at Oxford. (Take a look at me helping to occupy the Indian Institute as part of a student protest.) On your question, surely people are entitled to a private life before they go into politics.

“young Tories invading Labour HQ to the cheers of sympathetic onlookers”

They are too busy arranging alliances with the BNP and drink driving.

@33 “They are too busy arranging alliances with the BNP and drink driving.”

It wasn’t the BNP terrorising an Asian woman yesterday, was it?

32 – the Indian Institute is now the Modern History Faculty. Has a lovely weathervane of an elephant on the roof.

“It wasn’t the BNP terrorising an Asian woman yesterday, was it?”

I suspect they were actually.

37. Mark Carrigan

@ 19

“so far NOT ASINGLE student has known what the full proposals are”

How on earth can you possibily claim to know this? As with similar events I’ve found it morbidly fascinating to trawl through online comments to see how the reaction plays itself out. This is a particularly striking example of a much more common theme: the assumed ignorance of those protesting. It’s certainly a revealing assumption and those making it rarely seem to be called on it.

[deleted]

39. Douglas Hayward

Speaking of education, you need to get your apostrophes (or is that “apostrophe’s”?) under control, mate –

“That generation of student’s”

should NOT have an apostrophe!

[deleted]

@The Truth

I think Planeshift was making the point that somewhere in the UK on any given day the BNP or its sympathisers will be terrorising an Asian woman. Because they are Asian. Your argument completely falls to pieces because the protesters weren’t arguing about race or immigration or religion: they were arguing about politics and the policies of our beloved leaders. For you to bring race into this debate is at best naive and at worst deliberate trolling.

42. George W. Potter

7

“How strange that right wingers don’t care if people are killed when our “heroes” invade and occupy foreign countries, but get all sensitive at the thought of people being killed during a demo. Killed otherwise than by the police, that is.”

Or, to put it another way:

How strange that left wingers get all sensitive if people are killed when our “heroes” invade and occupy foreign countries, but don’t care about the thought of people being killed during a demo. Killed otherwise than by the police, that is.

There’s a flipside to everything and whataboutery does not excuse the violence at the protests. Innocent people were injured and dozens of businesses’ premises were destroyed.

Hehe @4 and 5. It’s only a matter of time before somebody uses the words “hub” and maybe even “one-stop shop”. For which, naturally, there’ll need to be another website.

On the student protests.

Briefly two points no-one (I think) has raised.

1) Why is it that Universities in the UK are by far the most expensive in Europe? If the French and the German and the Scandinavians can charge way less, why not Britain?

2) A simple fact: the history of Tory governments is packed with social unrest. It’s their style of government, seeking confrontation, antagonising entire categories of people. It’s just 5/6 months into their government and they’re already picking ideological fights with public sector workers, the unemployed, benefit recipients and students. I dread to think what will happen after a year or two!

Erm…This is the link I meant on the student protests.

46. Luis Enrique

claude – same reason they have cheaper railways and higher taxes: more funding out of general taxation.

47. Mark Carrigan

@ Luis

And a differing understanding of the role of the university. I fear this is what’s getting lost with the focus on the purely economic – though certainly very important – issue of fees. If you read through the proposals, it’s advocating a paradigm shift in how universities are managed, funded and understood to fit into wider society.

This obviously isn’t all Browne’s doing – in many ways it represents an articulation and codification of tendancies which have been ongoing for at least 15 years – but it is hugely significant and, thus far at least, hasn’t been the subject of meaningful democratic debate.

[deleted]

49. Luis Enrique

Mark

You’re right. Quite apart from the fairness or otherwise of various funding mechanisms, there are changes to what universities do.

In fact, whilst there are important worries about whether loans discourage students from poor households, there’s not so much difference between repaying a loan when you have a decent paying job to fund uni and paying general taxation when you have a decent paying job to found uni. The changes to what universities do may be more important.

fwiw whilst being one of this website’s resident shills for the neoliberal consensus mainstream economics, whilst I haven’t specifically studied it I’m very suspicious of the marketisation of education, I’m aware of some big name economists who are too (here is a future Nobel winner on the topic). There are all sorts of way in which it could be counterproductive.

Have a look at my video, this is the demo that the other 49,800 people went to; angry but peaceful students protesting and talking about the issues.

http://www.vimeo.com/16725528

Luis,

On the question of marketisation of further education, is there any choice other than market or state control (a mixed system will generally bring the worst of both systems in)?

I think this is just the beginning. And not just students but Unions and minority political parties on the left will come to the fore. As most students has explained, when you have exhausted every other avenue, just like the French Revolution, then there is no option but to resort to anarchic behaviour. Students need to rise and defend themselves against the extremist policies of the coalition tyranny.

@ 52 Rae

Remind me, who was it who introduced tuition fees? Then raised them?

And please, while you are at it, tell me how you would fund higher education?

Or why it isn’t fair for people to pay for their own furtherance…..or should those not recieving the benefit of it pay for those who are through taxation?

Whilst it would be lovely to send everyone to uni for free, reality has to be introduced to the discussion at some point.

Good god. The sheer level of vehemence on both sides of this is alarming. Idiots turn up at protests. It happens. In this regard, the left and right have little distinction. All this braying just distracts from the reasons the protests happened in the first place, which I suspect is the purpose of these ridiculous trolls swarming the site.

Rae,

Some of us are old enough to remember the distant past. The protests (which I took part it) against the introduction of the full student loan and end of maintainance grants (for those who don’t know, this was c. 1995). They were large, and united the student body (even the Young Conservatives were split over them as I remember – and no, I was not one of them).

They worked so well, didn’t they…

Anyway, looking at your comments:

As most students has explained, when you have exhausted every other avenue, just like the French Revolution, then there is no option but to resort to anarchic behaviour.

I agree. So they have tried the democratic route first have they? Or the legal route? Or in fact any route other than that of the last resort, violence.

Students need to rise and defend themselves against the extremist policies of the coalition tyranny.

Errmm, ignoring the illogical stance of defending yourself against extremist policies by adopting anarchist behaviour, could I point out that current students (and next year’s, perhaps the year after’s) will not be affected by these changes, so are not in fact under any requirement to defend themselves. They can of course defend others, should you wish.

Perhaps the most interesting thing in your assertions though is that you do not indicate anywhere that this is the will of the people, surely a prerequisite for a genuine popular revolution (which is what violence has to be to be other than thuggery or political repression). Rather, your assumption is that students have to fight to defend their position against the state, which pays for their position, regardless of the will of the people.

57. Luis Enrique

Watchman, 51

I’m afraid I don’t know. Would it be fair to say that whilst state funded, universities have been remarkably free of hands-on state interference?

incidentally, I am told that some people close to the Tories have actually been arguing for standardisation of syllabuses across universities. An insane idea.

“An educated population is an end in itself; education should be free, for all.”

Not it isn’t and no it can’t.

1)No amount of learning is ever wasted, even if it isn’t immediately apparent what use it is. I mean, I once learn to read – I never imagined I’d be using this skill to read policy documents.

2)who pays the teachers and for the teaching materials and the teaching premises?

Luis,

There is an anti-intellectual wing of the Conservative party (unsurprisingly to me, these are normally the same Conservatives who favour a big state and big business) which fails to understand the difference between universities and schools, and are behind such triumphs of modern statism as the National Curriculum and overtesting of children without attendant qualifications. They think (if we can grace it with that experession) that the point of education is to tick off the progress, not develop the person (wierdly, this also answers the question why are some European universities cheaper – they are built on the same centralising logic).

As to the lack of hands-on interference, this is true to a fair extent, with one crucial proviso. The state, through the Higher Education Funding Council for England, sets a maximum number on student recruitment, and therefore effectively limits growth and development of departments. This is not only a problem for ‘good’ universities – it stops the ‘new’ universities being able to increase income to a level where they can develop centres of research excellence for example, landing them in a catch 22 where their staff have to teach rather than research, but they need to research to improve their chances of attracting more funding. If we accept that the primary function of universities is to teach (research is a secondary function that can be performed elsewhere) then in effect the government holds control over universities’ primary functions.

“1) Why is it that Universities in the UK are by far the most expensive in Europe? If the French and the German and the Scandinavians can charge way less, why not Britain?”

Well, our best universities tend to be significantly better than their best: http://www.globaluniversitiesranking.org/images/banners/top-100%28eng%29.pdf

I imagine MIT, Harvard and Columbia are even more expensive than ours (sans scholarship funds etc.).

Heh, I love how hysterical some right-wingers get when they come here.

As for the other websites: we’re working with most of them. Some of them are working with us on the new site – what we’re not going to do is replicate each other’s work and waste time doing the same stuff. There’s also quite a bit technology going into FE.

The Cuts Wont Work site is excellent but it’s only meant to be a one-page site.

Just to say that – despite differences on opinion re Afghanistan etc… – I fully support Sunny on this issue.

i am so happy this protest is happening all the cuts are driving me mad
EMA is now cut i cant want to protest


Reactions: Twitter, blogs
  1. Liberal Conspiracy

    The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  2. Nigel Shoosmith

    RT @libcon: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  3. Gi Joe

    RT @libcon: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  4. safefromwolves

    RT @libcon: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  5. Lee Hyde

    Reading: "The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave | Liberal Conspiracy" ( http://bit.ly/a3DTKA )

  6. Kate B

    LC on the protests yesterday: http://bit.ly/aEGwmg

  7. Heskin Radiophonic

    RT @libcon: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  8. Tom Fowler

    RT @hangbitch: LC on the protests yesterday: http://bit.ly/aEGwmg

  9. Joe Cassels

    RT @hangbitch: LC on the protests yesterday: http://bit.ly/aEGwmg

  10. Goldsmiths UCU

    RT @libcon: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  11. sunny hundal

    The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave. But we have to plan locally http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  12. Greener London

    RT @libcon: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  13. Juliet Shaw

    RT @sunny_hundal: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave. But we have to plan locally http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  14. Louisa Loveluck

    'This isn’t just about large, national protests – this should be a movement focused on targeted, local protests': http://bit.ly/d6McIF

  15. Rosie

    RT @sunny_hundal: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave. But we have to plan locally http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  16. Bella Caledonia

    RT @sunny_hundal: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave. But we have to plan locally http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  17. Clare Cochrane

    Oxford Save Our Services promoted in @libcon today! http://tinyurl.com/397mrmj

  18. Sunny on the riots

    […] So, err, when do these higher fees and loans come in then? […]

  19. jim mcvicar

    RT @libcon: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  20. Student Protests: Notes of a Veteran. « Tendance Coatesy

    […] Further: Charlie, who was at the same Uni as Coatesy, has useful comments – here.  More Veteran musings here. Well-judged comments about the famous window-smashing here. Radical nightmare for Daily Mail – here. Liberal Conspiracy has some wise words – here. […]

  21. Tim Whale

    RT @sunny_hundal: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave. But we have to plan locally http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  22. John Warrender

    RT @sunny_hundal: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave. But we have to plan locally http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  23. Pamela Heywood

    The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave http://twurl.nl/u77dej

  24. Cary D Conover

    The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave …: On Oct 3rd there was the Right t… http://tinyurl.com/23ab3yf #HILARY

  25. Founder Fire

    #teaparty #912 The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave …: On Oct 3rd t… http://tinyurl.com/23ab3yf #RIGHTTOWORK

  26. GuyAitchison

    RT @sunny_hundal: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave. But we have to plan locally http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  27. Millbank #Demo2010: Non-violent student demonstration, eh? — The Wardman Wire

    […] Sunny at Liberal Conspiracy: So let’s stop self-flagellating about the absolutely tiny minority of protesters who threw a few […]

  28. Nick H.

    RT @chaostocosmos: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave http://twurl.nl/u77dej

  29. Wendy Maddox

    RT @libcon: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  30. Pucci Dellanno

    RT @libcon: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  31. MicheBella

    RT @sunny_hundal: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave. But we have to plan locally http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  32. Siobhan Schwartzberg

    RT @libcon: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  33. Donnacha DeLong

    RT @libcon: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  34. Staffordshire UNISON

    RT @libcon: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  35. Class War:”In our game, 100 points if you put a copper in hospital” — The Wardman Wire

    […] There are also other campaigners supporting the use of students of as fodder for what I think I can accurately call a ‘reinvention of the progressive left’, or see them as part of a movement to which they themselves aspire, which is also Sunny’s bag. […]

  36. Developing a community | Hedy Korbee

    […] The number three referring url and website is the influential hyperlocal site createdinbirmingham which links the artistic and creative communities.   Having websites link to you and linking to others is absolutely crucial when it comes to thriving online.   For example, we also benefitted this week from a link in an article about the Millbank student protest/riot in the left wing political blog Liberal Conspiracy. […]

  37. False Economy

    RT @libcon: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  38. Other TaxPayers Alli

    RT @FalseEcon RT @libcon The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  39. Liz K

    RT @FalseEcon: RT @libcon: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave http://bit.ly/9r47qA

  40. Peter Pannier

    RT @FalseEcon: RT @libcon: The student protests were only the beginning of a tidal wave http://bit.ly/9r47qA





Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.