Gove goes from hero to zero at Daily Mail


11:00 am - July 12th 2010

by Sunny Hundal    


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Daily Mail comment on 8th July:

At last! After 13 years in which Labour placed social engineering and pupil-power above education, common sense is breaking out in Britain’s classrooms. Dumbed-down exams are being toughened up. Schools are being freed from political interference.

And now teachers are to get greater protection against pupils’ malicious allegations, and more power to deal with troublemakers. The Mail applauds Education Secretary Michael Gove on a promising start.

By Friday 9th July:

Pressure on Education Secretary Michael Gove intensified today after he was criticised by a Cabinet colleague over his mishandling of the classroom-building programme. Mr Gove will embark on a tour of the country to say sorry in person after giving schools false hope that their projects would be spared the axe.

But Lib Dem Cabinet Minister Michael Moore said told Question Time last night the education secretary had made a ‘major mistake’.

Mr Gove, who was branded a ‘miserable pipsqueak’ in parliament over a series of blunders he made with the axed £55bn scheme, will go to nine schools in Sandwell, West Midlands and one in Doncaster, South Yorkshire to say sorry.

Ouch.
via Tabloid Watch

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About the author
Sunny Hundal is editor of LC. Also: on Twitter, at Pickled Politics and Guardian CIF.
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Reader comments


1. Gaf the Horse

Ha ha ha. Not often I agree with the Daily Mail, but the sooner Gove is gone the better. He’s a talentless moron playing stupid ideological games with out children’s education. Not sure who would replace him though, but surely it couldn’t be anyone worse.

Oh come now, BSF was a complete shambles and it’s been documented by Private Eye, as well as by government reports for years now ( http://bit.ly/bHnUkW for some of them)

When you look as the actual figures as well, the capital budget it remaining intact, getting rid of the mess that was BSF may well mean more schools are refurbished and built.

“He’s a talentless moron playing stupid ideological games with out children’s education. ”

Well, yes, but he’s also a key Policy Exchange operative and there’s no way, having bought this government, that they’re going to give up the essential revolutionary tool of indoctrinating the young.

The one we should be watching is Francis Maude, by the way.

Gove won’t ‘go’; he’ll simply be moved from one department to another, each time making a similar mess, each time a little nearer the exit door, until he decides to leave politics to make more money via journalism and a fat contacts book. Just keep him a\way from Culture, Media and Sport is all I ask.

Well, he didn’t go to the right school. No room for oiks in Dave’s government!

Is he on the Daily Mail carcinogenicity scale yet?

Gove won’t ‘go’; he’ll simply be moved from one department to another, each time making a similar mess, each time a little nearer the exit door, until he decides to leave politics to make more money via journalism and a fat contacts book.

Unless he’s caught up in a private scandal a la David Laws, he’ll be SoS for Education for the full first term – and probably quite a way into the second term. Get used to it kiddies.

TimJ – I’m thinking more along the lines of John Patten, a previous SoS for education of whom great right-wing things were expected. But It’ll probably be a year or two before the crap hits the fan regarding the Coalition’s education policies.

7 – well, time will tell. I’m far more confident that Gove will survive in office than I am for most cabinet members.

The thing I find amazing with Gove is that he was ever given the job in the first place. In the Education debates during the election he put forward his free schools idea and referenced Sweden- where it has been proven to be a bad idea. His own evidence proved him wrong- why is this man in charge of our schools?!

In the Education debates during the election he put forward his free schools idea and referenced Sweden- where it has been proven to be a bad idea.

So bad an idea that the only political party in Sweden that opposes them is the Communist Party.

11. Chaise Guevara

Know how the Mail kicks off all the time about the “nanny state” and “being told what to do”? Well, suddenly they’re having a massive go at the Tories for shutting down the Food Standards Authority: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1293814/Doctors-fury-Tories-axe-FSA–giving-junk-food-industry-free-pass.html

My guess is they campaign for the Tories at elections, but just bitch about whoever’s in charge the rest of the time.

@11

That would give credence to my theory that the Mail is staffed by nihilistic fascists, who like all good Nazis take their philosophy from that most anti-human of beasts, Herr Nietzsche.

“Unless he’s caught up in a private scandal a la David Laws, he’ll be SoS for Education for the full first term – and probably quite a way into the second term. Get used to it kiddies.”

The Coalition Blunkett.

14. Chaise Guevara

“That would give credence to my theory that the Mail is staffed by nihilistic fascists, who like all good Nazis take their philosophy from that most anti-human of beasts, Herr Nietzsche.”

Depressingly, I suspect it’s mainly staffed by reasonable (if somewhat disgusting) human beings who are fully aware of the amount of bullshit they come out with but also know a lucrative market niche when they see it.

@14

I fear you may be right. But then again, as Orwell mentioned, even the Nazis were “highly civilised human beings”… heh. Maybe we should fight back using their own weapons against them – The Daily Mail Causes Cancer, perhaps..? 😉

16. Richard P

Free schools: “So bad an idea that the only political party in Sweden that opposes them is the Communist Party.” (Tim J)

Perhaps – but Social Democrat leader Mona Sahlin is certainly not keen on the system in its current form ( http://sverigesradio.se/cgi-bin/International/nyhetssidor/amnessida.asp?programID=2054&Nyheter=0&grupp=3574&artikel=3669590 ).

Having a system already in place and deciding what to do about it is, of course, completely different from deciding whether to introduce the system in the first place.

When you say the Communist Party, do you mean the Left Party (which is no longer Communist) or the actual Communist Party (as opposed to the Communist Workers Party and the Workers Party Communists)?

17. Chaise Guevara

“The Daily Mail Causes Cancer, perhaps..?”

Cancer of the MIND! 🙂

18. Ken McKenzie

@14

Actually, it’s slightly more depressing than that (for a Leftie) – I’ve dealt with quite a few Mail freelancers and quite simply the Mail treats them much better than other papers do (simple things like pays them on time and lets them sell copy on), and so they stay loyal to a good employer.

19. Chaise Guevara

Well, I can’t and won’t argue with decent business practice. Fair play.

However, I know someone who knows someone (two links, does that make it a potential urban myth?) who briefly worked for the Mail. Apparently, he was told “at the end of a Mail article, the reader must hate something or someone”.

Take it as you will.

In the news on Tuesday evening:

“The scrapping of school building plans has cost education authorities at least £160m, says the Local Government Association. This is in addition to the estimated £100m which construction companies say they have spent on cancelled bids.”
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/10618950.stm

21. Chaise Guevara

Regarding Bob’s link: wtf does the BBC think it’s doing using sub-headings like ‘Ripped off’ and article subtitles like ‘One school’s horror at the axing of its rebuilding programme’?

“wtf does the BBC think it’s doing using sub-headings like ‘Ripped off’ and article subtitles like ‘One school’s horror at the axing of its rebuilding programme’?”

The BBC is probably just reflecting the anger out there. With the low ebb in housebuilding, a large chunk of the construction industry was looking to the school building programme to keep going and that has been snatched away by Gove.

A talking point around where I live at the edge of the GLA area, is the curiously large number of road working contracts underway, all at the same time, with consequential disruption of traffic flows and public transport.

The strange feature about all this is that on most days few, if any, workmen are visible on any of the sites actually working on the parts of the roads partitioned off behind the barriers. Every so many days, a work team turns up and does a bit of work and then disappears again for the next several days.

23. Chaise Guevara

“The BBC is probably just reflecting the anger out there. With the low ebb in housebuilding, a large chunk of the construction industry was looking to the school building programme to keep going and that has been snatched away by Gove.”

Which the BBC really, really should not be doing, of course.

“A talking point around where I live at the edge of the GLA area, is the curiously large number of road working contracts underway, all at the same time, with consequential disruption of traffic flows and public transport.

The strange feature about all this is that on most days few, if any, workmen are visible on any of the sites actually working on the parts of the roads partitioned off behind the barriers. Every so many days, a work team turns up and does a bit of work and then disappears again for the next several days.”

I’m with Michael Douglas on this one. They’re up to something; either justifying budgets or building support for more motorways.

“Which the BBC really, really should not be doing, of course.”

The anger out there from the axing of the school building programme by Gove is real enough – we’re talking about construction businesses on the edge of survival. By its reporting, the BBC is reflecting this, which is what we expect from respected national news media.

“I’m with Michael Douglas on this one. They’re up to something; either justifying budgets or building support for more motorways.”

I suspect construction companies, in expectation of a forthcoming work famine as the result of the coming cuts in public spending, set about collecting as many contracts as they could win by tenders or negotiation regardless of whether they had sufficient resources hired to do the work contracted.

Having got the contracts, the companies spin the work out for their existing work teams by sending them out to work a few days on each job. The work takes longer overall but generates essential incoming cashflow.

25. Chaise Guevara

“The anger out there from the axing of the school building programme by Gove is real enough – we’re talking about construction businesses on the edge of survival. By its reporting, the BBC is reflecting this, which is what we expect from respected national news media.”

The BBC is meant to be impartial. Reporting on people’s feelings is fine. Using the word ‘horror’ outside of (ha) scare-quotes is not, unless the article’s about the latest horror film.

The BBC simply should not be using biased language, and no, the fact that more than 50% of readers may agree does not make it unbiased. It’s tabloid journalism (and, I have to admit, it’s out of character for a normally reliable institution).

“I suspect construction companies, in expectation of a forthcoming work famine as the result of the coming cuts in public spending, set about collecting as many contracts as they could win by tenders or negotiation regardless of whether they had sufficient resources hired to do the work contracted.

Having got the contracts, the companies spin the work out for their existing work teams by sending them out to work a few days on each job. The work takes longer overall but generates essential incoming cashflow.

Funny story. Sounds unbelievable. Probably true.

However, this crap has been going on for a long time. Road repair work (and probably all sorts of other work, it’s just that roadworks piss us off and encourage healthy cynicism) always seems to be being dragged out, or at least ridiculously poorly planned. I’m not going to blame the crisis in toto.

Friends and acquaintances remark on the observable feature of any numbers of barriers closing off parts of highways with no visible presence of workmen on the sites for days on end and no evident progress in site work. Unpredictably, a work team suddenly materialises one day and puts in a few days work before disappearing again, leaving.the job uncompleted. It’s difficult for casual observers to envisage a rationale for this way of working.

27. Chaise Guevara

Agreed. Considering that they have to get permission from local authorities to disrupt services, you’d think they’d have to submit a well-thought-out and efficient plan, and be dropped like a hot potato if they went more than 10% or so over schedule. It’s hugely suspect.


Reactions: Twitter, blogs
  1. Liberal Conspiracy

    Gove goes from hero to zero at Daily Mail http://bit.ly/b55PCQ

  2. Dirk vom Lehn

    RT @libcon: Gove goes from hero to zero at Daily Mail http://bit.ly/b55PCQ

  3. Stable & Principled

    RT @libcon: Gove goes from hero to zero at Daily Mail http://bit.ly/b55PCQ

  4. Greg Eden

    RT @libcon: Gove goes from hero to zero at Daily Mail http://bit.ly/b55PCQ





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