How many cabinet MPs went to private schools?


1:22 pm - May 13th 2010

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by the blogger and tweeter Hannah Nicklin

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More of an indictment of the state of our society than the state of the cabinet itself.

Other key Gov ministers (though not full cabinet members) “Lord” Strathclyde, Francis Maude, “Sir” George Young, Oliver Letwin, and David Willetts also all went to private school which by my reckoning brings the % to around 60(ish). And only 4 women? So much for the New Tories…

3. Gaf the Horse

Any chance someone could you do the same for;

1) The first Labour cabinet in 1997.
2) The last Labour cabinet last week.
3) The CEOs of the major private companies in the UK.

??

Would be fascinating to contrast and compare.

Why does this matter? Are there not better things to scrutinise the new coalition on? I say this as someone who went to a comprehensive called by The Sunday Times ‘the worst school in Britain’ (before I attended), denounced by the Today programme for racial incidents (whilst I attended), and then attended grammar school for sixth form.

@4

Because they (the ConLibs (Libservatives?)) keep banging on about how they’ve “changed” politics for the better and we’re now in some glorious heaven where politics is all new and amazing. It isn’t and it hasn’t changed one iota. The same old suits are in the same old places. The political class and the people who make our laws are the same white upper-middle class privately-schooled men as always. Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose, and all that .

How many Labour ministers went to Oxbridge, Grammar schools and the like?

Didn’t Diane Abbott, who destroyed the LibLab pact, send her kids to private school?

This is all pointless. Play the policies, not the spokesmen/women.

Another fun fact: the number of women in the Lib/Tory cabinet IS EXACTLY THE SAME as in Gordon Brown’s final cabinet.

The big difference is Labour ex-private schoolboys rose above class interest; Conservatives entrench them (Orwell went to Eton and he was to the left of every MP currently in the House).
This is a Tory party that voted against the minimum wage and in favour of homophobic discrimination, remember.

Oh but yeah, Diane Abbot is a treacherous scumbag.

Because they (the ConLibs (Libservatives?)) keep banging on about how they’ve “changed” politics for the better

Well, if they don’t cause the deaths of a million brown people, intern refugee children or try to put 90 days detention on the statute book, they will have done. I could go on. Being proles (those of them didn’t go to grammar/private/Oxbridge themselves) didn’t exactly make successive New Labour cabinets paragons of virtue.

The likes of IDS are going to have to go some to out-Tory the likes of Hammer of the Poor, James Purnell (‘education in France before returning to study for his A Levels at the Royal Grammar School, Guildford and then taking a first in Philosophy, Politics and Economics at Balliol College, Oxford’).

Is this phase one of the fightback? Christ.

@9

We live in hope.

I’m not a Labour loyalist, btw, and loathe Purnell as much as the next person with a brain – but I’m certainly more worried about the new Gov. I’m sure IDS will rise to your challenge.

As the person who put this together, I just want to add the context with which it was tweeted. This doesn’t *mean* anything. It’s just some information I was interested in and thought would be worth sharing on Twitter.

Information does enable people to extrapolate meaning from it – but real party political meaning can’t be extrapolated without a similar comparison of the last Labour cabinet – feel free to make that if you’re interested.

Personally I suspect the answer is that *all* of UK politics is heavy with a disproportionate amount of privately educated people, why does that matter? Well it depends if you think that politics should aim to be representative of the aspect of the people they purport to stand for, and if you think such a high number of private schooled people in positions of power point to our society being much less of a meritocracy than people like to claim. There’s also the attitude that with fairer representation come more understanding policies. This goes for the whole of politics, not just one party.

But like I said, I haven’t all the information on that yet, so I shall withhold judgement.

12. marie-odile

@7 This coalition has had 2 days. At least wait until they have royally fucked up to give them a blanket condemnation. After all, 13 years of Labour hasn’t done a great deal to reduce inequality in Britain.
(I see your general point, and it is the same reason why Nick Clegg’s poshness was less focussed on than Cameron’s, what matters is the interests politicians support, not where they went to school (though obv sometimes these correlate)

@11

Aw, way to diffuse an argument; I was having fun there 😉

Personally I suspect the answer is that *all* of UK politics is heavy with a disproportionate amount of privately educated people, why does that matter? Well it depends if you think that politics should aim to be representative of the aspect of the people they purport to stand for,

Depends on what you mean by representative; half the public are of below average intelligence, I don’t think we need any people in government from the bottom half.

15. marie-odile

Maybe this could work to our advantage actually – (so many posh boys in cabinet). Maybe they could club together some of their family fortunes and get us out of the deficit? 😉
It’s the only way George Osborne will do anything good as chancellor….

Ken Clarke actually went to Nottingham High School, an independent school. In Fairness, so did Ed Balls.

Slightly unfair to a few of them. St Vince, for example, arrived at school in 1954…rather before there were any (or at least many) comprehensives. Similarly,. Pickles’ school is now a comp…..hardly his or anyone elses’ fault about his date of birth. Same with Theresa May.

Hague:

“Hague was born in Rotherham in Yorkshire, and was educated at Ripon Grammar School and Wath-upon-Dearne Comprehensive in Rotherham.”

Ken Clarke went to grammar, yes, but in, umm, 1951….rather early for there to have been comps. The very first comp was in 1949 and the real expansion of them didn’t start until 1965 under Crossland.

And HMS Conway? That was a training school for midshipment for the Merchant Marine. More like a vocational scool than anything else.

Some of this distinction between comps and grammars is simply a product of the age of the respective politicians.

“Ken Clarke actually went to Nottingham High School, an independent school.”

Yes…but when Ken when there it was a direct grant maintained grammar and when Blinky did it was an independent place.

Only one Etonian in cabinet? Standards are clearly slipping.

20. Watchman

As a totally ignorant question, were any of the cabinet’s public-school educated individuals scholarship pupils, children of staff or otherwise entitled to attend through a scheme designed to widen participation without their parents (who made the bloody choices remember) having to pay full cost?

Just asking, as this debate may be a bit too black and white, when there is a lot of colours involved in education.

@14 or half of people are fundamentally failed by an education system. I wouldn’t call Osborne top drawer, but he’s doing all right on the best education money could buy. Privately educated doesn’t mean intelligent. It just means privileged.

Also, for completeness’ sake, according to this Tweet: http://twitter.com/chickyog/status/13914362579 37% of Brown’s Cabinet (though I’m not sure if pre-or-post-reshuffle) were privately educated.

@17 my bad, I grew up in Lincolnshire where the options are comp or grammar (I just did some googling and apparently most places don’t have grammars any more!) However they don’t have anything to do with the extrapolated stat, I didn’t consider their bearing to be fundamentally important. Though on the HMS Conway thing, Hague’s wikipedia article was a bit scant on details for his education, so I assumed being educated on a boat meant private. Willing to be corrected.

@20 if you are interested, find out. That’s what I did*

*it may or may not bring you more grief than you expected.

23. Watchman

Hannah @ 22,

Unfortunately, unlike place of education, how supported is not necessarily public information…

Actually I have no reason to suspect all the above are not full fee-paying, but you never know.

Was trying to work out what was the most famous (non-Scottish) public school not respresented on the list above though.

“Though on the HMS Conway thing, Hague’s wikipedia article was a bit scant on details for his education, so I assumed being educated on a boat meant private. Willing to be corrected.”

IDS, not Hague….but yes, you could call Conway private. But not really. Original foundation was :

“In the mid-19th century, the demand for a reliable standard of naval officers had grown to the point where ship owners decided to set up an organisation to train, and indeed educate, them properly: the Mercantile Marine Service Associations (MMSA).”

And in later years (when IDS was there) is was a direct grant funded school….Govt money chanelled through Chsire County Council.

“As a totally ignorant question, were any of the cabinet’s public-school educated individuals scholarship pupils”

Dunno about in cabinet….but BoJo was at Eton. Kings Scholar…nowadays it means some off the fees and maybe all of the fees swallowed by the school, depends on the income of the parents. A bit like Harvard actually….if you can get in (as a King’s Scholar that is, not just into Eton) then they’ll make sure you can afford to be there.

“Was trying to work out what was the most famous (non-Scottish) public school not respresented on the list above though.”

Ampleforth? Stowe? St Paul’s for Girls (Harry Harman’s old place)?

Ah, actually, no, it’s got to be Winchester, doesn’t it?

“Labour ex-private schoolboys rose above class interest”

LOL!

27. WhatNext?!

@21:

“@17 my bad, I grew up in Lincolnshire where the options are comp or grammar (I just did some googling and apparently most places don’t have grammars any more!)”

You didn’t know that most places don’t have grammars anymore??? Seriously??Including Lincolnshire. Kent is the only county in England that still has a full system.

28. Arthur Holder

Its also interesting to ask how many cabinet members are Oxbridge graduates and how Oxbridge manages to get so many of their graduates into top jobs. Meritocracy? I think not.

@18

I stand corrected Tim. Do you know when the changeover happened? Was it before or after Hoon went there?

Hannah,

@14 or half of people are fundamentally failed by an education system. I wouldn’t call Osborne top drawer, but he’s doing all right on the best education money could buy. Privately educated doesn’t mean intelligent. It just means privileged.

My point is about merit vs. representativeness (is that a word?). And “half of people are below average intelligence” is a math joke.

By the way, I don’t think Osborne merits being Chancellor over, say, Cable.

“I stand corrected Tim. Do you know when the changeover happened? Was it before or after Hoon went there?”

Heh….I’m just looking it up on wikipedia…….Hoon’s entry says it was independent when he was there, Clarke’s that it was direct grant when he was there. Balls is younger than Hoon so would have been ind then as well.

@26

I mean historically, and generally, any leftish politician who was educated at private school is by definition rising above class interest. The 2nd Viscount Stansgate, for example, was educated at Westminster and Oxford – and is more commonly known as Tony Benn.

“I mean historically, and generally, any leftish politician who was educated at private school is by definition rising above class interest. The 2nd Viscount Stansgate, for example, was educated at Westminster and Oxford – and is more commonly known as Tony Benn.”

That’s making a rather grand assumption really. That espousing leftish ideas is indeed rising above family or class interests.

T. Benn was the son of one cabinet minister and the father of another. thanks goodness for espousing lefty ideas and social mobility is all I can say….

@5: So? It’s about what they do, not who they are. Of course, I think we should have people from all walks of life and all creeds in politics, but just because some of them went to private schools doesn’t really matter.

35. Flowerpower

Why should it be in the least surprising that people who went to good schools (and then good universities) do well, while those who went to crap state schools (and white-tile unis) do less well?

Nor do I see why it should be any kind of virtue to sponge off the taxpayer for the education of your children. As the Occupant of the Manse (second only to the Laird in the Kirkcaldy social pecking-order) the Rev Broon should have put his hand into his tight pocket and shelled out for Gordo to attend Fettes, just as Mr Blair Snr. had to do…

Nice to see that Ed Balls’s dad (a university lecturer) paid for young Ed’s education. Shame Ralph Miliband (a more successful university lecturer) felt so constrained by his ideological Marxism to make the same sacrifice. (it would appear from press reports of the Miliband legacy that he spent the money on a nice Georgian house instead).

Ah well….. at least Harriet Harman’s parents did the decent thing and shelled out for St Paul’s Girls.

#34

It’s not an attack on the individuals concerned to point out how many went to private school (or at least it shouldn’t be); it’s an indication of the pernicious effects of class. It shows class differences still exist and they are important, not merely an ideological curiosity. Otherwise you’d expect just 10% of the cabinet to have gone to private school.

That’s aside from the fact that if you have had a privileged life the life experience which informs your judgements is not as likely to reflect the ordinary struggles most people face. (I accept that’s not too much of a problem if it’s only a few people in the cabinet, but the higher the number the more the effect is magnified as the effect is self-reinforcing.)

37. Watchman

“I mean historically, and generally, any leftish politician who was educated at private school is by definition rising above class interest.”

So my state-school educated parents are therefore betraying their class by being right wing?

I can’t help thinking your analysis is stuck in a simplified version of Marxist theory, combined with the strange idea that this is a zero-sum position, rather than understanding that class, if it has any meaning, is only one of a number of possible identifiers people use, and is probably not high on most peoples list of reasons for chosing to support a political party. And also, if left-wing policies are meant to be generally beneficial, why would supporting them be rising above class interest, so long as that class benefited as well?

38. Luis Enrique

Otherwise you’d expect just 10% of the cabinet to have gone to private school.

well, not quite. Not if private school select pupils on basis of innate ability, and ability is a determinant of prob of becoming a politician. Also not if private schooling confers ability (a better education).

This, by the way, is not to deny the existence of a grotesque class system. i.e. private school also conferring connections, preferential treatment etc.

39. Watchman

tim f,

“Otherwise you’d expect just 10% of the cabinet to have gone to private school.”

If that was true, we would also expect a certain amount of the cabinet to be criminals (as in convicted, not rhetorically accused), to have learning difficulties, to be living on benefits etc. None of these hold true, as none of them are condusive to being elected, as electorates tend to discriminate in favour of those who can communicate well, do not have skeletons in the closet and give the impression of success (which appears to mean a nice haircut and suit…). Democracy does not produce governments which reflect the make up of the population, but rather those which reflect what the population sees as good traits in government. If education, success and confidence are included in these traits, then those with a good education are going to benefit.

Oh, and on re-reading, I can see how this post could look. Having been to a comprehensive myself, I am not trying to link criminals, learning difficulties and benefits to non-private education. I am merely using them to suggest arguing that the composition of the country should be reflected in cabinet is counter-intuitive.

If you do think the preponderence of private-school-educated types in cabinet is a problem, perhaps the answer is to sort out the state education system to produce better results in terms of possessing confidence, education and self-confidence, rather than focussing on numbers?

#38

I accept your point to an extent, but having been to a fee-paying independent school, I can guarantee they don’t always select on the basis of ability! (Take that whichever way you like!) There is a high self-selection factor, and at the school I went to, anyone from the (fee-paying) junior school was let into the senior school automatically, whereas everyone from state primaries had to do entrance exams which were easily coached-for.

So too, there are more important things than “ability”, especially when considered in the narrow sense we’re talking about here. I would sooner have an MP who was in touch with the public, had lived an ordinary life and who was deeply principled than, a consummate politician regarded has having a high level of ability like, say, Mandelson.

#39

I’m mainly in agreement with your last paragraph – although I think it’s necessary to end or at least reduce private education (removing the state subsidy would be a good start) in order to make the full improvements to state education I’d like to see.

Don’t worry, your 2nd paragraph wasn’t necessary, at least not for me. I didn’t think you were making those connections (consciously or sub-consciously). Personally I think it’d be great if we could elect people with learning difficulties or who had experience of being on benefits for extended periods to government. But I accept we’re probably a long way away from that. However I don’t think having a state education has the same stigma as those things, as 90% of the public get a state education themselves! So I don’t think that really accounts for the fact that so many of our MPs (and especially the ones in the cabinet) went to private school. Again, class has to have more to do with it.

@31

On further investigation, it looks as if Nottingham High School was independent when Clarke was there, but he was one of 40 pupils who attended in 1951 on a local authority scholarship after passing the 11+. So I suppose the upshot is, he went to private school but was not privately educated which is the more fundamental issue.

“Personally I think it’d be great if we could elect people with learning difficulties”

Eh?

Haven’t you been paying attention? Half the cabinets since the war are proof positive that we’ve been doing exactly that!

@27 WhatNext?!, I only left school a few years ago, and haven’t had any other reason to encounter other school systems. Also, I elected to go to the local comp rather than try for the grammar ages away, so it’s never come up. Live and learn etc.

Our new Tory MP for Dorset South, Richard Grosvenor Plunkett-Ernle-Erle-Drax has declared the coalition as “Ghastly”. I don’t know whether he thought there were too many plebs or too few…

46. Watchman

tim f @41

My point was not to make state education a stigma (never done me any harm) but to point out that it does not consistently instill the same discipline and skills as a good private education seems to do. So the electorate, who are less concerned with quotas or toff-bashing, and more with chosing someone they want to elect, will probably be inclined to select a higher proportion of privately-educated individuals than there are in the pool of the general population, even if we discount all those stigmatised.

And I accept that learning difficulty has a range of meanings, but I doubt it is a sensible aspiration to try to elect people who have difficulty learning things (as Tim W says, we may do it though)? I’m quite elitist about politicians – they shouldn’t need qualifications, but it would help if they were intelligent and thoughtful, not indoctrinated and easily led (and that rules out as many professors as it does plumbers). Experience of the benefits system would not be bad, but since we want some energy and initiative in politicians, perhaps this will generally rule out long-term dependence? After all, by definition the best people will find ways to use their skills and the most driven will not sit back and wait for things to come to them.

Mind you, considering the amount of career politicians still around (there’s a question – how many in the cabinet (being generous and allowing that David Cameron and Nick Clegg have had paid work not being a politician or a political hack, even if they were working with politicians)?) perhaps the cast of Shameless and someone with learning difficulties would improve the House of Commons…

47. Flowerpower

Our new Tory MP for Dorset South, Richard Grosvenor Plunkett-Ernle-Erle-Drax has declared the coalition as “Ghastly”….

Perhaps he is descended from the Guards officer who – when asked what it had been like serving in the trenches at the Somme – replied: ‘The noise, my dear! …..and the people!….”

“Richard Grosvenor Plunkett-Ernle-Erle-Drax”

Isn’t it a wonderful name? PG Wodehouse would not have been brave enough to invent it.

Father was, I believe :”Admiral Sir Reginald Aylmer Ranfurly Plunkett-Ernle-Erle-Drax, KCB, DSO, JP, DL “.

Bit of alright he was, too: joined the Navy at 16 (1896), saw service at Jutland and Dogger Bank, was still in the Navy at aged 63 (in 1943) when they threw him out as too old for active service. So he went back to sea as a convoy commodore in the convoys crossing the Atlantic. That was when the U Boats were still sinking a lot of them.

Yes, yes, I know, inherited privilege and all that: but at least some of them thought they inherited duties along with the privilege.

There’s several variations of the Ernle Erle Drax names around as various branches have married in and out over the centuries. I cannot remember the exact mixture but there was one marriage apparently between an Ernle Erle Drax and Erle Ernle Drax.

(That story may have changed in the telling of it but there was something like that out there, two multiple barreled names which were different only in their order marrying each other).

49. Elaine Carville

It would appear that even with their excellent private education, the Liberal Democrats, haven`t thought through this coalition as well as they think they have. They have been seduced by the offer of power ( let`s see how much in reality.) and some Cabinet posts. It has been like watching children distracted by a shiny new toy! The Tory Party has all the real power posts and now the next reshuffle could have the Lib Dems out in a breath.I am glad I went to a state school if that is the level of common sense a private education gives you.

Tim W

Funnily enough “Vote Plunkett-Ernle-Erle-Drax” was shortened on posters to “Vote Drax”. Probably for the same reason that Vote Annunziata Rees-Mogg was abbreviated to Vote Nancy Mogg – class becomes a barrier to the wider public.

On another class related point, (and I know there is some thread drift here), does anyone know if we still have more MP’s called John than there are women in Parliament?

@37

So my state-school educated parents are therefore betraying their class by being right wing?

I can’t help thinking your analysis is stuck in a simplified version of Marxist theory, combined with the strange idea that this is a zero-sum position, rather than understanding that class, if it has any meaning, is only one of a number of possible identifiers people use, and is probably not high on most peoples list of reasons for chosing to support a political party. And also, if left-wing policies are meant to be generally beneficial, why would supporting them be rising above class interest, so long as that class benefited as well?

Nah, you’re extrapolating something that I didn’t say from what I wrote. My only point was that if you identify with socialist or left values (and yes I accept that is up for definition) and have had a life of privilege (ie: the trappings of wealth, private education etc etc) then quite obviously you are not being self-interested – otherwise you’d support policies that let you keep your inherited wealth & privilege. And yes everyone including the upper class would benefit from idealised left-wing policies, to the same extent that men would benefit from feminist policies – it’s good for society and not merely one section of it.
And I’m not saying that class is the only identifier that people use but I suspect it has bigger influence than you’d think, particularly with people who go into politics to be an MP or whatever. It’s not fashionable to talk about class anymore because apparently we’re all bourgeois now (tell that to my call centre ex-colleagues..) so people don’t readily admit it.
As for your parents I have no idea – the working class Tory is one of those strange political bits that is peculiar to analysis (sorry I can’t phrase that better been a long day..!); but it’s the same lot of people that let Thatcher in 3 times in a row so clearly has some sway.

52. Matt Munro

@ 11 “Well it depends if you think that politics should aim to be representative of the aspect of the people they purport to stand for, and if you think such a high number of private schooled people in positions of power point to our society being much less of a meritocracy than people like to claim.”

But “representative” of whom ? (their own constistuencies/London/the whole country) and on what basis ? (sex, age,class, ethnicity, dis(ability) etc etc).

Irrespective of my politics, personally I’d like to be represented by someone who is *capable* of representing me – i.e reasonably educated (doesn’t matter where), articulate, able to argue a point, well informed, and reasonably well presented.
The advantage of a private education is that it turns out people with these characterstics by the dozen, the failing of state education is that it mostly doesn’t.

Assuming that most people would use an approximation of the same selection criteria, and given that the cabinet is both a self-selecting and selected group, there is no logical or statistical reason why it should be representative of any wider population grouping.

53. Yurrzem!

So what do our normal schools need to do to improve the success rate of their alumni? Perhaps a proper analysis could be useful in formulating new policy for leftish parties? Ditch the dogma and look at the facts? It might even expose an old boys network, who knows?

I’d rather have a cabinet full of white privately-educated Oxbridge men who aren’t trying to take away my civil liberties, than a cabinet full of white state-educated Oxbridge men who ARE trying to take away my civil liberties.

Is this phase one of the fightback? Christ.

I wondered how long after all the gay jokes Labour’s hordes have been tweeting out of their arses about Nick&Dave, would the “class” attacks follow.

Inequality between the richest and the poorest increased whilst Labour was in government.

Labour let the banks run wild then used taxpayers’ money, including poor taxpayer’s money, to clean up the mess.

You tell me which class Labour have been fighting for since 1997.

As for this “fightback” – yeah, it’s a case of “we can’t attack them on policies because a lot of them are Lib Dem policies that we actually like, so let’s attack them for the colour of their skin, their gender, and which schools their parents sent them to.”

Because I think that’s really going to win over the electorate.

“Vote Annunziata Rees-Mogg was abbreviated to Vote Nancy Mogg – class becomes a barrier to the wider public.”

The Nancy Mogg thing is somewhere between a joke and something that Dave Cameron tried to persuade her to use…..vote Jacob RM ran on the posters and he did get elected after all.

Two snippets: I was at school (Downside) with some Rees Moggs. But not Jacob (as first son he went to Eton and damn the religion bit) and not Annunziata for she’s far too young. But there are 10 of them, so there were still a couple left over for me to go to school with.

The other Nancy Mogg joke is that she used to be a leader writer for the Telegraph. Then they let her have a column or two.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/personal-view/3631623/Why-todays-women-will-flaunt-it-even-if-they-havent-got-it.html

Yes, she really does manage to confuse “sclerosis” with “cirrhosis” throughout the piece.

My old mate who used to be a sub on the Torygraph was incandescent at that one. Me, I just think that the voters of Somerton and Frome were being sensisble really. Sadly, those of NE Somerset weren’t. I would actually take George Galloway over Jacob RM as a valuable MP……

57. Eric Johnson

Moving on from the schools issue, nobody has picked up on this being a totally white government apart from Warsi who is an appointee. Neither the Tories Asian nor their Black shadow ministers (Vara & Afriyie) have been taken into Govt. Both have had to make way for white LibDems. Not a single non-white MP on the Treasury bench! What century is this?

It looks like the Daily Mail have been here before: I didn’t realise they were liberal-left paper
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1233566/Tory-parliamentary-candidate-Richard-Grosvenor-Plunkett-Ernle-Erle-Drax-called-plain-Richard-Drax-De-toff-Cameron.html

Regarding Ms Mogg’s misspelling of Cirrhosis – I am presuming this is a misstype picked up by a spellchecker, the same programme would have her as Enunciated Wrasse-Mug.

Why does all this matter? well it comes down to how convingly they can reach out and connect with the wide communities of their constituencies and beyond. We Lib / lefts risk the same problem: when I last lived in Brighton there were a few too many kids called Bilbo or Comfrey (educated at home or at a Steiner school). This gives the parents a public statement of difference, but potentially gives the adult Bilbo a barrier in connecting with people.

Is that why there are so many MP’s called Jon?

The new Leader of the House of Lords is called Thomas Galloway Dunlop du Roy de Blicquy Galbraith, 2nd Baron Strathclyde. He likes to be known as “Tom” apparently.

Tim W
Small point really, but Wath Grammar School became a comp in 1974, Hague’s family owned a soft drinks company (pop as they call it in these parts), and in the Summer holidays William used to help on the delivery lorries, he used to deliver ‘pop’ to my family.
Lincolnshire still has a selective school system whereby children take the 11 plus but it isn’t compulsory.
We can’t ,in all fairness, judge politicians by their education, it is totally beyond the control of any child where they are educated and how rich their parents happened to be.

61. WhatNext?!

Two thoughts on the figures:

1) What was the proportion of privately-educated cabinet members in the 20 years before, and the years since grammar schools were (all but) removed from the equation? Many believe that removing grammar school entrance has reduced social mobility.

2) For genetic reasons, there are bound to be more privately-educated cabinet members than the national average would suggest. Quite simply, those with the ability to make the money required are more likely to breed children with above average ability (and no, I don’t mean “better” children in the wider sense). 53% seems a bit steep though …..

@6 blanco

“How many Labour ministers went to Oxbridge, Grammar schools and the like?

There you are again, blanco. Is it all you can do? Whenever an objection or a doubt is raised as this “bright new politics” heralded by Cleggeron, you just reobotically repeat that “New Labour also did that”?

Does that give’em a licence to reiterate the same old shitty patterns? I thought we were gonna look forward to CHANGE?

there you go again

Didn’t Nick Clegg use this line in the debates…? 🙂

Seriously, this:

I thought we were gonna look forward to CHANGE?

I am being cautiously optimistic. And yes, I do think scrapping ID cards, rolling back the DNA database, ending the third runway, raising the tax threshold for low earners, electing the Lords by PR, having a referendum on AV, fixed term parliaments, and ending child immigrant detention is CHANGE. There are pitfalls ahead. This might all end in tears.

What I am saying is: chill the fuck out. It’s been 2 days into this government. They’re promising a lot of good stuff. They might not deliver it. But a) I think you’re wrong about the wonderland of a Tory minority government that would’ve won a majority after the summer, b) it’s silly of you to judge a government on 2 days and some cabinet appointments – I think we all said Clinton would be a bad Sec of State but she has actually been not-bad-at-all, c) anyone who’s supports Labour (I know you don’t currently, but this is aimed at the tribalists here) hasn’t got a leg to stand on in criticising this government – after the shit they pulled.

Nothing gets me more outraged than hypocritical outrage (which might make me a hypocrite, I don’t know).

@63 blanco

it’s silly of you to judge a government on 2 days and some cabinet appointments”

It’s obvious that we have to wait and see, let them get on with it etc, I mean obviously. But surely freedom to oppose and criticise remains intact in this country, right?
Or is the only allowed line of thinking now strictly the one about “the bright new politics” of the “two young men”?

Nothing is ever totally good or bad. The same way I always disliked New Labour, there was some good there too: northern Ireland, the minimum wage, SureStart, a few bits they did for the elderly, better social stability (fewer riots and infinitely fewer strikes) than in the 80s and 90s.

That didn’t stop (and rightly so) people from focusing on the many “atrocities” (in some case literally -Iraq-) that were being committed or the promises that were being betrayed.

“I am being cautiously optimistic. And yes, I do think scrapping ID cards, rolling back the DNA database, ending the third runway, raising the tax threshold for low earners, electing the Lords by PR, having a referendum on AV, fixed term parliaments, and ending child immigrant detention is CHANGE. There are pitfalls ahead. This might all end in tears.”

Good for you. The 1997 manifesto was also very good. Look how much was implemented. Forgive me if this sounds brutal but flying-by-the-seat-of-one’s-pants optimism in politics has always made me wince. Because people tend to easily cheer the “new” and the “cool” and the “trendy” on the back of media enthusiasm, and then -gradually, bit by bit, when the mask slips, it turns out that nobody really ever did…

The Blair experience, again, springs to mind.

Unlike you, I can see enormous trouble with the Tory manifesto on welfare being “implemented in full”. I can see trouble with Iain Duncan Smith dictating social and family policy assisted by Chris Grayling. The Purnell agenda being taken one step further and without even internal disquiet or hesitation.

I can see trouble with a bunch of fiercely Europhobic NeoCons (Hague, Fox, Osborne) in all the key posts. I can see trouble with the fact that, this time round, there won’t be any union mitigating “savage cuts” from within.

As for civil liberties, clearly (ON PAPER) the brighter side of the new Con/Lib coalition, still, wait and see. God forbid, but wait until an attack or something particularly unpleasant takes place and we’ll see how long the Conservatives hold on before they toe the hysteric right-wing press line and contiune where New Labour and that pillock David Blunkett had left.

It was easy, while in opposition, to champion civil liberties.

@ What Next 61

Quite simply, those with the ability to make the money required are more likely to breed children with above average ability

Not sure the inheritance of intelligence (or whatever…. ) quite works so neatly.

What about regression to the mean?

What fascinates me about this rather silly debate is that no one ever mentions that perhaps the greatest/ most principled flag wavers of the left over the last 40 years – Tony Benn and Michael Foot both went to private schools – Westminster and Leighton Park respectively. This is typical of the many discussions on left wing blogs where the basic premise is always that if the Tories do it it’s bad but if Labour do it it’s good. I can accept a view that says that private education is inherently good or bad but not one which says that it is inherently good or bad dependent on which political party you join afterwards. If you argue that shouldn’t that also apply to comprehensives if they produce Tory politicians?

It was easy, while in opposition, to champion civil liberties.

How so? It was hardly a populist position.

I think distinctions should be drawn. People are silly if they think the Tories will support rehab instead of punishment and other things of that nature. But I think it’s reasonable to believe they are more interested than Labour in fairness and liberty up to that point at which someone becomes convicted – habeas corpus, fair trials, juries are the things that Labour kept attacking. And certainly LibDems seem committed to those particular aspects liberty.

As I say though, fingers crossed they will maintain those values in government.

The problem with you liberal conspirators is that though you are always banging on about class, you really don’t understand it.

You imagine, for instance, that because Richard Drax has a quadruple-barreled name he must be a social grandee. But a proper toff would regard him as a frightful nouveau-riche oik.

The Erle-Drax clan made their pile by being Lefties. They were on Cromwell’s side in the English Civil War – and were well rewarded for it.

Later, they sided with the awful Dutchman, King Billy, so beloved of our Northern Irish loyalists against the rightful King, James Stuart.

Yes, and you had the ridiculous spectacle of Lord Falconer on Question Timne last night trying to sound all offended by Cameron and Clegg’s background, without ever admitting that he went to the fee-paying Edinburgh Academy – along the road from TB at Fettes and Alastair Darling at Loretto.

This really is a bygone battle for a bygone age.

Is the left really ahted independent schooling that much – why lift no fingers at ll in the longest sustained period in government, to do something about it?

Drop it. Move on.

@Claude I agree with most of that. I’m not saying it will be peachy. Yes, it’s mainly a Conservative government – but in many ways it might turn out to be better than New Labour. Who knows. Probably better to be sceptical and not be disappointed if things do fuck up.

A lot of it depends on the relationship not just between the two leaders but I think also between the two party memberships. I think the strength of the coalition depends on the two memberships being able to stomach each other, discuss where they can work together, and come to some sort of non-OTT-aggression pact, with the horrors of New Labour and the shared love of liberty and the individual as guiding principles in how the government moves forward.

I also think Labour should stop this class bollocks. They’re all petty bourgeois anyway, with the top rank (like Blair) fucking upper class now. Class-based analysis of society only really works if you think people from different classes can’t work together and get along. Newsflash: they bloody well can, and we should be working to decrease the gap between the rich and poor, rather than just have them fighting each other all the time (because the rich inevitably win that fight).

71. Giles Bradshaw

Perhaps private schools tend to give a better education?

…and people try to say there is no class divide.

Can someone from the Tory trolls come forward and explain to the rest of us how a privately educated school product can ‘communicate’ effectively with someone from a central London housing estate?

…and there you have the answer as to why the breakdown of society continues unabated and why you will never be able to solve issues such a inner city crime – because they simply don’t understand.

“Can someone from the Tory trolls come forward and explain to the rest of us how a privately educated school product can ‘communicate’ effectively with someone from a central London housing estate?”

It’s called “language”.

Often thought to be the defining ability of human beings.

74. Luis Enrique

the breakdown of society continues unabated

I thought that was a Tory line?

75. flowerpower

Can someone from the Tory trolls come forward and explain to the rest of us how a privately educated school product can ‘communicate’ effectively with someone from a central London housing estate?

In my experience, it tends to be the lads from the Central council estates who have problems communicating.

“Can someone from the Tory trolls come forward and explain to the rest of us how a privately educated school product can ‘communicate’ effectively with someone from a central London housing estate?”

any fule no that language is but a small percentage of how you communicate, and is even less of what is perceived.

Another part of the problem concerns things like empathy and emotional intelligence. How often have we seen people failing to properly put themselves in someone else’s shoes: “She was just a bigoted woman!”.

In my experience, and generally speaking, many public school educated people have little or no advantage in terms of empathy and emotional intelligence over others, but they are often more articulate and have a greater confidence, and definately a greater belief in themselves which makes them think they can communicate better. But if you can be articulate and persuasive, but have not understood how you will be and are being received, then you are basically walking into a fight.

… but then as the Fast Show said “-My parents are so middle class they sent me to a comprehensive school!”

77. Flowerpower

Privately educated:

Tony Blair
Alastair Darling
Peter Hain
Ed Balls
Harriet Harman

State educated:

Gordon Brown
John Prescott
Bob Ainsworth
Kerry McCarthy
Sharon Hodgson

Score for communications and empathy skills.

78. Matt Munro

@ 72 “Can someone from the Tory trolls come forward and explain to the rest of us how a privately educated school product can ‘communicate’ effectively with someone from a central London housing estate?”

Assuming that both can speak English (a dangerous assumption, granted) I would have thought the answer was obvious. If you are referring to the problem said council estate dweller might have with anything other than txt spk (aka fuckwit) then that says more about the dire “education” on offer in many parts of the state sector than anything else.

If you are referring to the ability of the toff to empathise with the council estate dweller that’s a different issue, but logically it should be irrelevant, lots of socialist have come from privelidged backgrounds.

Turned around, are you saying that council estate dwellers cannot communicate with anyone with anyone who isn’t from the same background as them ?

Either way it’s inverted snobbery.

Flowerpower – I am afraid anecdotal examples don’t disprove my generalised assertion, based on my experience (but maybe my “genetic make up” has limited me to only encountering the dregs of the public school pile !).

If I could be bothered I would come up with an alternative list. But that would not clinch an argument.

Moreover, my key assertion was that “public school educated people have little or no advantage in terms of empathy and emotional intelligence over others”, but they may believe they do, as they are often more confident in their abilities. Perhaps in the end that was part of Blair’s weakness?

80. Richard W

67. ukliberty

‘ But I think it’s reasonable to believe they are more interested than Labour in fairness and liberty up to that point at which someone becomes convicted – habeas corpus, fair trials, juries are the things that Labour kept attacking. And certainly LibDems seem committed to those particular aspects liberty. ‘

I am sure the starving miners as they were cavalry charged consoled themselves with the thought despite my head not being intact at least my ‘ civil liberties ‘ are.

Richard W,

I am sure the starving miners as they were cavalry charged consoled themselves with the thought despite my head not being intact at least my ‘ civil liberties ‘ are.

That seems a strange thing to be sure about.

82. Nick Cohen is a Tory

Depends on what you mean by representative; half the public are of below average intelligence, I don’t think we need any people in government from the bottom half.
Political Eugenics. Wonderful.
Ernest Bevan didn’t go to university but he did wonderful work in the war and set up NATO.
Perhaps your right, let them enter politics, or think tanks because they are fuck all good in industry. No common sense, ask most people who have to work with the tossers. A litttle like UK liberty
UK liberty , how many of the laws that are now statutes are the Tories repealing.
I have feeling that when push comes to pull you will be as illiberal as Labour.
Although I would say that politicians come from a narrow section of the community, personally I couldn’t give a toss.

nciat,

UK liberty , how many of the laws that are now statutes are the Tories repealing.

I don’t know, I can’t read minds. Why don’t you ask the Tories?

84. Steve Comer

I don’t believe ‘the old school tie’ is in itself the issue it once was, the issue is that have wealth itself opens doors in later life.( And by definition those who go to private school have wealthy parents). A subtle difference maybe but an important one.

Many of the political class now have had to spend time as ‘interns’ (ie. unpaid workers) between University and their first paid position, so.If you are not for a wealthy background what do you live on?

Many parents committed to Education are prepared to save to help their children study for a degree, but after three years usually both parents and students have racked up debt, and can’t afford another couple of years with not even a student loan available (especially of the unpaid ‘job’ is in London).

82
‘half the public are below average intelligence’ Seems like a statistical impossibility to me, unless the other half are 50% above the average intelligence. And judging by most of the shower in the current government, they certainly weren’t taken from the latter half.

“‘half the public are below average intelligence’ Seems like a statistical impossibility to me, unless the other half are 50% above the average intelligence.”

Umm, yes. That’s what “average” means.

87. Bored of tribalism

84 Steve Comer “( And by definition those who go to private school have wealthy parents)”

Err not so fast. I went to boarding school and it was paid for by, well, all of you. Military families, diplomatic families etc get highly state-subsidied private education as the parent(s) need to live abroad (often serially). There is no way my family could have afforded it otherwise.

Its lazy thinking and just political toilet graffiti to paint all privately-educated people as top-hatted aristocrats. Its no better than saying all state-educated people are criminal chavs.

“Military families, diplomatic families etc get highly state-subsidied private education as the parent(s) need to live abroad (often serially). ”

Quite…when I were a lad it was 75% subsidy for military families and 100% of diplomats (inc British Council).

89. Seun Abayomi

I think the issue over the representation of the cabinet is more that independent or privately funded education, by quality of teaching or exposure to the power it brings, gives you a much better chance of entry. I would also go further and say that if more of the privately paid wanted to go into government they could which would distort the picture even more. My issue would be that if you have a society, as we do that is under severe stress and in economic turmoil, you have to believe that as bright and forward thinking as some of the above and their predecessors may be, that actually their collective intelligence needs to be tempered by something a little less privileged. A shame we cannot have a number of reserved seats for the state schools to provide some balance. That of course would get the calls of positive discrimination.

90. Richard Blogger

Umm, grammar schools are not private schools, silly people.

In fact since each City Academy (the flagships of Blair’s education policy) have to be registered with Companies House as a “school company” you could argue that they are more private than most public schools which are listed as charities.

@90

Grammars aren’t included in the OP’s percentage of 53% privately educated and are specifically mentioned on their own terms. Reading fail.


Reactions: Twitter, blogs
  1. Liberal Conspiracy

    An illustration of private-school intake of the new cabinet http://bit.ly/c5TLUA

  2. David Skelton

    Interesting post @libcon http://bit.ly/alxtSG We need to improve social mix of Parliament as a whole, as I argued here: http://bit.ly/ahzdTG

  3. Ian Gibson

    RT @libcon: An illustration of private-school intake of the new cabinet http://bit.ly/c5TLUA

  4. Me Myself and I

    And in the last cabinet? RT @sunny_hundal: How many cabinet MPs went to private schools? http://bit.ly/cPkPlx (via @hannahnicklin)

  5. Thomas Hemsley

    RT @sarabedford: RT @sunny_hundal: How many cabinet MPs went to private schools? http://bit.ly/cPkPlx <– Does it matter?

  6. Sheryl Odlum

    RT @libcon: An illustration of private-school intake of the new cabinet http://bit.ly/c5TLUA

  7. Kyle Williams

    RT @sunny_hundal How many cabinet MPs went to private schools? http://bit.ly/cPkPlx (via @hannahnicklin) <– Who gives a fuck?!

  8. H K LIVINGSTON

    "How many in cabinet went to pvt schools?" http://bit.ly/cPkPlx How many 2007-10 ministers did not–economy sunk. Irrelevant at best.

  9. Nicole Healing

    RT @libcon: How many cabinet members went to private schools? http://bit.ly/9u31Ym

  10. Tweets that mention Liberal Conspiracy » How many cabinet MPs went to private schools? -- Topsy.com

    […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Liberal Conspiracy, Nicole Healing. Nicole Healing said: RT @libcon: How many cabinet members went to private schools? http://bit.ly/9u31Ym […]

  11. sunny hundal

    How many cabinet MPs went to private schools? http://bit.ly/cPkPlx (via @hannahnicklin)

  12. Sara Bedford

    RT @sunny_hundal: How many cabinet MPs went to private schools? http://bit.ly/cPkPlx <– Does it matter?

  13. Iain Whiteley

    RT @sarabedford: RT @sunny_hundal: How many cabinet MPs went to private schools? http://bit.ly/cPkPlx <– Does it matter?

  14. Tom Sheppard

    I'm Reading: How many cabinet MPs went to private schools?: by the blogger and tweeter Hannah Nicklin
    .
    http://bit.ly/bsAJr2

  15. A balanced cabinet « Freethinking Economist

    […] in Uncategorized. Tagged: Social Mobility. Leave a Comment See this picture from LibCon (ooh, how […]

  16. Nick Hider

    53% of ConDem cabinet educated at private schools http://tinyurl.com/2wgd9x8

  17. On the class system in England

    […] tad more complex and deeply rooted in our history than some manage to grasp: The problem with you liberal conspirators is that though you are always banging on about class, […]

  18. Natacha Kennedy

    53% of ConDem cabinet went to private schools, vs. 7% of the UK population. http://bit.ly/cyzlHw. How can these posh boys represent us?

  19. Great comments on left blog of our time

    […] steveb at Liberal Conspiracy. […]

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  32. Graham_Ellis

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  41. Nathan Chalk

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  42. Sue Sanger

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  51. Alice Perry

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  52. David Gray

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  53. Annie B

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  54. Graham Turner

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

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    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  57. jaywalking

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  58. Dave Mawer

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  59. Phill Monk

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  60. sarahkhayes

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  61. Mark Machado

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  62. Loudie

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  64. Gemma Hewitt

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  65. JukeBox Jury

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  68. Ben Molineux

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  72. William Jones

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  73. Andrew Nix

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  75. Cerith Rhys Jones

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    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60

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  79. PB

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  80. Michael Hanley

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  81. Michael Denoual

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  82. notlob

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  83. Al Gorham

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  84. Andy Williams

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  85. Patrick Roberts

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  86. Stephen Moss

    RT @wdjstraw: RT @johnprescott: % of public who went to public school – 7%. % of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyoutalki …

  87. Stephen Moss

    RT @wdjstraw: RT @johnprescott: % of public who went to public school – 7%. % of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyoutalki …

  88. Stuart Robertson

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  89. Stuart Robertson

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  90. Ellie Kilyon

    RT @johnprescott: % of public who went to public school -7%. % of ConDem Cabinet -53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyoutalkinaboutwilletts

  91. Ellie Kilyon

    RT @johnprescott: % of public who went to public school -7%. % of ConDem Cabinet -53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyoutalkinaboutwilletts

  92. Nick George de Souza

    RT Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyoutalkinaboutwilletts

  93. Nick George de Souza

    RT Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyoutalkinaboutwilletts

  94. Gordon Herd

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  95. Will Reid

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  96. davehowells

    RT @wdjstraw: RT @johnprescott: % of public who went to public school – 7%. % of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyoutalki …

  97. hilsbee

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  98. damaskedmarvel

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  99. Adam Croome

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  100. AzadBanks

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  101. Jordan Hall

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  102. Rob O'Driscoll

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  103. Victoria Caswell

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  104. DIANE BRIERLEY

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  105. Marcus Dubois

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  106. Daniel

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  107. Johnny K

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  108. Nathalie Hoyland

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  109. Adrian Murphy

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  110. Liz Vater

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  111. Nicky

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  112. Maggie Alderson

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  113. John

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  114. Hayden Wood

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  115. Lovely Lynnette Peck

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  116. Joanne Dunn

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  117. Julian Swainson

    RT @johnprescott: Percentage of public who went to public school – 7%. Percentage of ConDem Cabinet – 53% http://bit.ly/b9CA60 #whatyout …

  118. Denis donovan

    How many cabinet MPs went to private schools? | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/0e0GeAA via @libcon

  119. James Maddison

    #Goves is a social misfit, trying to impose an educational system he experienced.See the list of other Cabinet members. http://t.co/AfNxRCDj

  120. Dave Shuck

    How many cabinet MPs went to private schools? | Liberal Conspiracy http://t.co/1k2gdGI9 via @libcon





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