Did US evangelicals urge Ugandan anti-gay Act?


2:16 pm - January 4th 2010

by Newswire    


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Last March, three American evangelical Christians, whose teachings about “curing” homosexuals have been widely discredited in the United States, arrived here in Uganda’s capital to give a series of talks.

For three days, according to participants and audio recordings, thousands of Ugandans, including police officers, teachers and national politicians, listened raptly to the Americans, who were presented as experts on homosexuality. The visitors discussed how to make gay people straight, how gay men often sodomized teenage boys and how “the gay movement is an evil institution” whose goal is “to defeat the marriage-based society and replace it with a culture of sexual promiscuity.”

Now the three Americans are finding themselves on the defensive, saying they had no intention of helping stoke the kind of anger that could lead to what came next: a bill to impose a death sentence for homosexual behavior.

The Ugandan government, facing the prospect of losing millions in foreign aid, is now indicating that it will back down, slightly, and change the death penalty provision to life in prison for some homosexuals. But the battle is far from over.

Instead, Uganda seems to have become a far-flung front line in the American culture wars, with American groups on both sides, the Christian right and gay activists, pouring in support and money as they get involved in the broader debate over homosexuality in Africa.

…more at the New York Times

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Reader comments


a. Homosexuality is evil.
b. Homosexuals can’t reproduce.
c. There are Homosexuals.
d. Therefore they must have been ‘recruited’.

Therefore if you kill them, they can’t recruit, so no more homosexuality and no more evil.

The homophobic line of the religious extremists is pretty simple, and totally insane.

I’m surprised that the US Congressional grouping “The Family” weren’t mentioned, who include Stupak and Ensign. Musevani is regarded as as their “key man” in Africa.

More here:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=120746516

3. So Much For Subtlety

3. Naadir Jeewa – “I’m surprised that the US Congressional grouping “The Family” weren’t mentioned, who include Stupak and Ensign. Musevani is regarded as as their “key man” in Africa.”

I am not. After all, who gives a damn? So some American politicians get together and witness their faith? Amazing. I am sure that female politicians are known to get together and network. Maybe have a coffee. So are Leftists. Doesn’t mean they secretly run the world does it?

Their “key man”? Wow. Scary. Can you explain to me why a belief in a secret conspiracy of powerful Christians running the world is objectively different from a belief in a secret conspiracy of powerful Jews running the world?

@ Naadir Jeewa

Hey,

Exactly as was said above by “So Much For Subtlety”, no one cares.

We’re selfish and self involved, so “who gives a damn”?

BUT I agree with you about the ‘The Family’.

Why were they not mentioned?

Because these dudes were the ‘fall out’ guys after all the work “the Family” did to f*ck up Uganda.

5. So Much For Subtlety

5. rantersparadise – “Exactly as was said above by “So Much For Subtlety”, no one cares. We’re selfish and self involved, so “who gives a damn”?”

More to the point there is no link between Event A and Event B. No matter how bad Event A is, unless there is a good link to Event B why should anyone give a damn about Event B? Uganda threatens to execute gay people and Natalie Portman refuses to do RomComs – oh my God, hold the presses! So some US Congressmen like to meet and talk about their Faith. Big deal. Why should anyone care?

“Because these dudes were the ‘fall out’ guys after all the work “the Family” did to f*ck up Uganda.”

There being no evidence whatsoever that these Congressmen have any influence on Uganda at all. By the way, who are these fall guys? Why do you need to look for someone in the West to blame? Why not just accept that Ugandans have their own agency and are perfectly capable of coming up with idiotic policies on their own with no help from the outside? Or do you think that Africans are all Noble people who have not one bad bone in their entire bodies and so could not do such a thing if it wasn’t for Evil White people?

@ So Much For Subtlety

The Family is not a conspiracy – they’re a registered 501(c) organisation with a big house on C Street. Jeff Sharlett spent a year within the group researching their activities.

Repressive codes against homosexuality, and in fact, the very category of homosexuality were brought in to many countries by colonialism, as an attempt to ‘normalise’ non-Western forms of gender and sexuality.

Therefore, what modern evangelical missionaries get up to in the Global South does matter. In countries where democratic representation is low, the influence of external powers is much more important. Especially when that’s combined with material power. Congressional members command far greater resources and more deeply involved in foreign policy making than their European counterparts. Family member, Senator Inhofe, for example, sits on the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations.

This is not about a conspiracy of a secret cabal ruling the world. It is about publicly elected officials abusing their powers for undisclosed private ends. It’s not about denying the agency of non-Westerners either. It’s about the confluence of domestic and transnational forces that are involved in the way states determine rights and punishments, and the actions that people in the West can take to achieve maximum effect.

Finally, there is evidence that The Family is involved with Museveni.

7. So Much For Subtlety

7. Naadir Jeewa – “The Family is not a conspiracy – they’re a registered 501(c) organisation with a big house on C Street. Jeff Sharlett spent a year within the group researching their activities.”

No but the claim that they are secretly running the world, or even just Africa, certainly is a conspiracy. Suppose everything you say is true and that they exist and they lobbied Uganda on this issue. So what? Ugandans are not children. They can make their own minds up for their own reasons. This is a non-story.

“Repressive codes against homosexuality, and in fact, the very category of homosexuality were brought in to many countries by colonialism, as an attempt to ‘normalise’ non-Western forms of gender and sexuality.”

Or to put it another way, academic anthropologists can’t bear the idea that some Third World people may just hate Gays. So they blame the wicked colonialists instead. None of which is relevant for a country that has been independent for near 50 years.

“Therefore, what modern evangelical missionaries get up to in the Global South does matter.”

How does that illogic follow precisely? What some other missionaries may or may not have done 100 years ago has what relationship with what some other people, from another Sect and another country, are doing now? I don’t see it. Where is the link apart from the fact both groups are Christians?

“In countries where democratic representation is low, the influence of external powers is much more important. Especially when that’s combined with material power.”

And yet the problem in Uganda seems to be one of democracy. Former authoritarian regimes did not give a damn, but the present democratically elected Parliament is imposing what look like democratically supported community values to me.

“Congressional members command far greater resources and more deeply involved in foreign policy making than their European counterparts. Family member, Senator Inhofe, for example, sits on the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations.”

And yet there is no evidence Inhofe or anyone else has played any role in the Ugandan laws at all.

“This is not about a conspiracy of a secret cabal ruling the world. It is about publicly elected officials abusing their powers for undisclosed private ends.”

And the difference is what specifically?

“It’s not about denying the agency of non-Westerners either. It’s about the confluence of domestic and transnational forces that are involved in the way states determine rights and punishments, and the actions that people in the West can take to achieve maximum effect.”

It is precisely about denying agency to Africans. If you keep taking my words, rephrasing them in more academic and pretentious language and then asserting that they mean the precise opposite of what they clearly do, then, well, tenure probably looms for you. Given you have just said that it is about denying agency – and that is what a confluence of national and transnational forces caused by Western people taking maximum effect actually means – why do you deny it?

“Finally, there is evidence that The Family is involved with Museveni.”

Not that I can see. Just more paranoid conspiracy theories.


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