Did Griffin lie about his father’s ‘war’ record?


9:02 pm - October 23rd 2009

by Unity    


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On last night’s Question Time, Nick Griffin twice made the claim that his father, former Conservative councillor Edgar Griffin, had served in the RAF during World War II.

Griffin’s exact comments were:

Finally my father was in the RAF during the second World War while Mr Straw’s father was in prison for refusing to fight Adolf Hitler.

“Mr Straw was attacking me and I’ve been relentlessly attacked over the last few days, my father was in the RAF during the second World War, I am not a Nazi. I never have been.”

However, yesterday’s Suffolk Evening Star carried an interview with Griffin’s father in which its stated that:

Mr Griffin, who moved to Suffolk shortly after Nick was born in Hertfordshire in 1959, joined the Conservative Party when he returned from two years national service with the RAF in India.

Although the reintroduction of conscription into the armed forces was reintroduced, in 1939, by the National Service (Armed Forces) Act service during World War II, and in any armed conflict, is always referred to as either ‘War Service’ or ‘Military Service’.

The term ‘National Service’ did not come into use until 1948, three years after the end of World War II and ceased to be used, at all, with the end of conscription in 1960.

If, as the Evening Star’s article suggests, Griffin’s father undertook National Service, rather than War Service or Military Service, then he cannot have served in the RAF in World War II.

UPDATE – THE PLOT THICKENS

First things first – we can rule out the suggestion that Griffin’s father served in the RAF in India under, specifically, National Service (i.e. later than 1947)

The one concrete fact that I have been able to establish is Edgar Griffin was in the UK on 13 May 1947, the date on which he was invested a Freemason in Barnet.

Given that RAF AHQ India was disbanded on 15 August 1947, this would preclude Edgar Griffin serving in India during the period of National Service, which would indicate that he was in India at some point during the period from 1945-47.

As far as wartime RAF activity in India, by the beginning of 1945 the majority of RAF India squadrons were operating from forward bases in Burma, but for two squadrons based on Cox’s Bazaar and one base at Kumira, near Chittagong in what is, today Bangladesh.

What we also have, via Cath in comments, is a 2001 article from the Independent which gives this description of Edgar Griffin’s time in the RAF.

Edgar Griffin served in the dying days of the British Raj in India, in charge of 20 local aircraft mechanics. “I got on very well with them,” he says. “The Indian ladies also used to invite us to tea and were most kind to us.” How, he asks, could he possibly be racist with such a splendid record of racial integration?

On the basis of that description, if Griffin was in India with the RAF before the end of WWII (August 1945) then its highly unlikely that he was stationed with any of the RAF squadrons that played an active part in the final stages of the Burma Campaign.

The brief picture that the Indy paints is, however, consistent with the ‘Indianisation’ of those elements of RAF AHQ India that were due to be transferred to the Royal Indian Air Force on India becoming an independent state in August 1947., during which British personnel trained their Indian counterparts to take over control of the airforce.

Now it gets very interesting because this helps us to date Griffin’s service in the RAF in India specifically to 1946 – before that things remain uncertain – which could place Griffin’s father into some very interesting historical events.

Churchill, as is well known, was implacably opposed to Indian independence and even after the 1945 General Election, the new Attlee government resisted moves towards independence.

This stance began to change in January 1946, when RAF servicemen stationed in India mutinied – they actually went on strike – in protest at the slow pace of demobilisation and the use of British shipping facilities for transporting American G.I.s, although papers released later, under the 30 year rule indicate that the government were deliberately keeping troops in India to control civil unrest should this break out in connection with the independence movement.

This mutiny/strike helped to precipitate the Bombay Mutiny of February 1946 which, in turn, led to the British Cabinet Mission 0f 1946 and to an agreement that India would become an independent state in 1947.

The Indianisation of the facilities and aircraft of RAF AHQ India could therefore not have started until May 1946.

That leaves a couple of sizeable but as yet unanswered questions.

Edgar Griffin was born in 1922, and would have been 17 years old at the start of WWII and ordinarily would have been eligible for conscription at the age of 18 unless he declared himself a conscientious objector, as Jack Straw’s father did, entered a reserved occupation – and many conscientious objectors took that route out of military service to avoid the stigma of being openly labelled a ‘conshie’ – became a clergyman, or was deemed medically or mentally unfit for service.

By 1942, when he would have been 21, he would have been eligible not only for conscription but for a posting overseas.

Yet, it would appear that Edgar Griffin may no have entered military service until 1945 – so what exactly was he doing during the other five years of the war when he could easily have been called up?

Then there’s business of his actual service history, where Griffin claims to have served for two years but was also definitely back in England by May 1947 and could, therefore, have left India no later than April 1947 in order to make the four week journey, by sea, via the Suez canal.

If we take this two years as accurate, then Edgar Griffin must have been in India by April 1945 at the latest (which means that he did manage to serve in the RAF for all of four months of WWII) but also that he must have been stationed in India in January 1946, during the time of the RAF mutiny, which began at an base near Karachi but, according to a Channel 4 Secret History documentary broadcast in 1996, spread to 60 bases, including bases in Ceylon (Sri Lanka), Burma and Singapore  – the Air Ministry, however, only ever admitted to 22 bases having gone on strike.

So was Edgar Griffin, perhaps, one of the RAF mutineers?

Right now, we can’t be sure because we lack access to the kind of military records that would enable us to fill in the blanks although what we can say is that Griffin’s my dad was in the RAF jibe at Jack Straw looks likely to be considerably less impressive, once the facts are known, than Nick Griffin would like us to believe.

Edgar Griffin was certainly not a pilot, does not appear to have seen service anywhere near the front-line, even if he was stationed in India while the Burma campaign was still under way and may even have taken part in the second largest mutiny in the history of the British Armed Forces, one topped only by the Indian rebellion of 1857.

NATIONAL SERVICE

To reiterate the point about the date on which National Service began the British Armed Force and National Service website notes that:

The requirement for a peacetime force larger than that made possible by purely voluntary recruitment led the post-war Labour Government to move towards establishing a national service system in 1946. The National Service Act was passed in July 1947 after considerable opposition from some Labour and Liberal politicians. The Act was to come into force at the beginning of 1949. The Act initially required a period of one year to be served in the Armed Forces followed by a liability for a possible five years in the Reserve. Financial crises, the advent of the Cold War and the Malaya emergency led to the National Service Amendment Act in December 1948, increasing the period of service to 18 months. This enabled National Servicemen to be used more efficiently and effectively, particularly overseas.

The demands of the Korean War (1950-1953) led to the length of service being extended to two years, surpassing even the Service Chiefs’ original wishes. Liability to further service in the Reserve was reduced with each of these extensions. The period of service remained at two years until the end of National Service.

So the earliest date at which Griffin’s father could have joined the RAF under National Service, and served two years, was around 1950.

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'Unity' is a regular contributor to Liberal Conspiracy. He also blogs at Ministry of Truth.
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Reader comments


I caught that as well yesterday. I think Griffin snr. needs to clarify his record and produce some proof. The MoD would have it too.

One option would be to pay a visit to the British Library. Amongst the multitude of documents are 300 volumes – “Air Force List Dec 1918-Oct 1948: L/MIL/17/10/1-300.” – which cover the Royal Indian Air Force and the RAF in India.

“Edgar Griffin served in the dying days of the British Raj in India, in charge of 20 local aircraft mechanics. “I got on very well with them,” he says. “The Indian ladies also used to invite us to tea and were most kind to us.”

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4156/is_20010826/ai_n13961695/?tag=content;col1

4. douglas clark

Unity,

Edgar Griffin was born in 1922, as far as I can tell. He’d have been 17 at the outbreak of WW2 in 1939. It seems to me that if he was fit enough, or not in a protected trade or profession he’d have at least have been liable for conscription before the War ended? It would be interesting to know for sure though.

Just a thought, but could it just be a bit of sloppiness in a shit local paper?

Delighted if Griffin jnr been telling lies, but worth being sure there’s a story here…

Would anyone have done National Service in India post independence? The interview also refers to the end of the Raj. Also, he’s 88 so difficult to see how he could have avoided being called up in WW2.

Sadly I suspect there’s nothing in this.

7. Stephen Rouse

Can we drop this please? Nick Griffin achieved the impossible last night – public sympathy for Jack Straw. He achieved it by dragging Straw’s father into the debate. Let’s not go down the same route.

Would anyone have done National Service in India post independence?

In the Army, definitely not – everything transferred over to the Indian Army on partition except for the Gurkha brigades.

AHQ India also disbanded on partition, with RAF forces being moved to the Far East Command but as Griffin Snr was a mechanic, that wouldn’t preclude the possibility of his having been in India for a while after partition as part of the transition, i.e. in a training role.

It would still mean that he’d have been out of India by the end of 1947, which fits the date on which he became a Freemason, but that would rule out him spending two years out there on National Service.

9. douglas clark

Unity,

My dad served in the RAF in WW2, also as a fitter as is happens. I seem to remember him telling me – it was a long time ago – that he was asked whether or not he wanted to stay in the RAF after the war finished. He didn’t, but the option was available.

Anyway, answering a question that doesn’t actually address the point at issue isn’t doing your case any favours. As you did at 10. What little evidence there is suggests that Griffin Senior was in India prior to Independence, not after it.

It does not rule out the possibility that he was there between 1945 and 1947, the latter being the date of Indian Independence.

Hang on there Douglas, I’m trying to research this as I go…

My grandad liberated the Jews at Belsen – this has no effect whatsoever on my views on race or immigration. If Nick agreed with his father he’d obviously be in the Tory party but he’s not. Family ties do not influence political views…

12. douglas clark

Jo Anglezarke,

I think I see where you are coming from but I’d be disturbed if your grandads experiences didn’t influence you at least a bit. We, you and I, are of the ‘lucky’ generations that have not had to face this sort of barbarity face to face. Oral history is something we should have some respect for, although it can sometimes descend into prejudice. I don’t believe your grandfathers story does that though. It is first person reportage from the inside of an evil regeime.

It is the best of evidence. Why do you not embrace it?

13. douglas clark

Unity @ 12,

Go!

Who cares what his father did? We already know he’s a liar and a fool so it seems unnecessary to drag his family in.

@douglas clark – true although I never actually met him. Also you could say all kinds of things about what your family got up to in the war but actually what it comes down to is a job being carried out. Soldiers carried out their duties. They had no choice. My grandad also did his duties. It has nothing to do with me. I may have been a racist had it not been due to experiencing racism through an Irish dad in the eighties. That had more relevance. The second world war shouldn’t be used in this way.

16. Shatterface

A word of caution: if Griffin’s lying then he deserves to be caught out but let’s not besmerch his father’s war record.

It doesn’t matter if he was serving in the RAF canteen or taking out the Axis powers single-handed, armed only with the crease in his trousers.

Griffin’s attack on Straw’s father was a low point for him. You could hear the audience suck in their breath.

17. douglas clark

Shatterface,

Especially as Straw appeared to be somewhat estranged from his dad.

Straw was brought up at Loughton, Essex by his mother, Joan Sylvia Gilbey[2][3] on a council estate after his father Walter Arthur Whitaker Straw,[2] an insurance salesman and the son of Arthur Whitaker Straw, left the family and condemned them to poverty.

We already know he’s a liar and a fool so it seems unnecessary to drag his family in.

Griffin dragged his own father into this.

19. douglas clark

Jo Anglezarke,

Sure, folk exaggerate. Some do it for comic effect. Some do it because it was a turning point in their lives. Not many would make up a story like that, would they?

OTOH, you seem to be conflating it with Spike Milligans ‘Hitler and my part in his Downfall’?

Perhaps you are more of a cynic about original testimony than I am. Or, willing to deny original testimony if it doesn’t suit.

Which would be kind of sad, really. For, it seems to me at least, that a little of it has come down to you….and you chose to be, at the very least, dubious , about it.

How does that serve you, exactly?

@20 “Griffin dragged his own father into this.” Yes he did, and in a particularly distasteful way.

@18 “A word of caution: if Griffin’s lying then he deserves to be caught out but let’s not besmerch his father’s war record.” I don’t think anyone has, it’s all been about the accuracy (or possibly otherwise) of Griffin’s remark about his father’s RAF record and I haven’t seen anyone saying anything unpleasant about Griffin senior.

@10 “In the Army, definitely not – everything transferred over to the Indian Army on partition except for the Gurkha brigades.” Sorry to be pedantic, but a Brigade, not Brigades, of Gurkhas remained in the British Army. Several Gurkha Regiments remained in the Indian Army, post Independence/Partition and, I believe, they still exist today.

21. Shatterface

Tony Benn would have been the ideal opponent for Griffin.

On the one hand he was in the RAF himself and on the other he’s a prominent opponent of an unpopular war the BNP think they can take the moral high ground on.

He’s a bit rambling these days but he’s respected and far more entertaining than Straw.

great insight, and yet more examples of how far griffin will in to get legitimacy, bringing in and potentially lying about his own family to get brownie points is atrocious.

23. douglas clark

Lee,

Unity is trying to make a case, and, so far, he hasn’t. I’d be delighted if he did, but your comment @ 25 is a bit premature, to say the least. Otherwise the idea that truth is independent of politics takes yet another knock.

There’s a simple solution to this. Rather than trying to draw conclusions from a single statement, or derive the details of Edgar Griffin’s military service record from various historical events, why doesn’t someone close to London go to the British Library and look the damn thing up!

This “drip, drip, drip” of inference and innuendo achieves nothing other than to diminish the credibility of those opposed to the BNP. And the almost sarcastic tone of statements such as “its highly unlikely that he was stationed with any of the RAF squadrons that played an active part in the final stages of the Burma Campaign” or “So was Edgar Griffin, perhaps, one of the RAF mutineers?” don’t help. Without looking at Edgar Griffin’s service record, you don’t know when exactly he served in India.

Unity, you said it yourself, “Right now, we can’t be sure because we lack access to the kind of military records that would enable us to fill in the blanks…”. Why not do the research, then post a comprehensive reply in your usual thorough manner. This post so far just seems like vindictive attempts at justifying a weak and poorly researched initial argument.

Just a data point. I’m not convinced that all serving RAF personnel would have left India in 1947. My grandfather was RAF and helped set up the Pakistani Air force Engineering College in 1950/51 I think it was. Pretty sure that he was still serving as an RAF officer at that time.

So I would be surprised if 1947 was a hard and fast late bound for serving RAF personnel to have been in the sub-Continent.

@27 I’m pretty sure Unity will do that, judging by his output he certainly appears to have too much time on his hands and a propensity to research things properly.

But, on this occasion, and I’ve gone it myself, you have such a potentially good idea you want to write something as quickly as possible, hence this post. I expect Unity to have a dull weekend ahead of him, checking records.

“This “drip, drip, drip” of inference and innuendo achieves nothing other than to diminish the credibility of those opposed to the BNP.”

Someone needs to tell Guido and his chums that this is how blogging works.

@29 “such a potentially good idea”

But is it really such a good idea. Griffin Jr says “my father was in the RAF during the second World War”. He didn’t say “My father flew Spitfires” or “My father fought the Japanese”. People may have drawn the implication that Nick was bigging up his father, but really all it shows is that both Edgar Griffin and Arthur Straw did what they felt they had to.

Instead we have a twice updated post and nearly 30 comments on unsubstantiated rumours and inferences regarding Edgar Griffin’s service record. A good idea? I remain to be convinced. Doesn’t advance the debate against the BNP one iota imho.

@30 “Someone needs to tell Guido and his chums that this is how blogging works.”

An approach that is so obviously going to “re-vitalise the liberal-left through discussion and action.”. Guido is a popularist with a personal objective. His blog isn’t there to advance the cause of libertarianism, but rather to let him fulfill is personal goals of making money, having influence and sh*t stirring; not necessarily in that order.

Mentioning Guido is almost the blogging equivalent of Godwin’s Law.

Whatever!

My dad’s willie is bigger than your dad’s willie.

Now, if Nick Griffin had been born in India. That would have put an interesting slant on things…

At best, I think this article was premature, but I also feel the suggestion that Griffin’s father might have been posted far away from action still implies a criticism of Griffin Sr, even if it is meant to undermine Griffin Jr.

I don’t think you should have published without hard evidence, if then. If you accept that their fathers’ contributions to the war effort are even remotely important then unless Griffin’s father’s war record is less impressive than Griffin Sr then I wouldn’t go down that route.

I’m not going to criticise Straw for the fact his grandfather contributed nothing; I would criticise his father though if HE were a public figure.

Sorry, ‘I’m not going to criticise Straw for the fact his FATHER contributed nothing..’, not grandfather.

Shatterface @ 23

an unpopular war the BNP think they can take the moral high ground on.

Seems to me they are taking the moral high ground and I am permanently surprised that more contributors to this blog don’t seem to get it. The level of comment on any post on Afghanistan here is always derisory and yet it seems to me there is a clear issue of class involved.

At the same moment our middle class youngsters are sent off to enjoy the hedonistic delights of university, our kids from the council estates are sent thousand of miles away to have their limbs blown off. This in support of what will probably go down as the dumbest act of aggression in history.

So, while the intellectual left seem content to debate gender rights and the capitalist sub-text in Harry Potter books, it is smart of Griffin to appear to care about the fate of the young men from his core constituency.

In fact, that was ungenerous. Who knows, maybe he really does care…….

36. Except no-one is forcing anyone to go in to the armed forces. Now I agree it is smart of Griffin to engage on the level of how the forces are being treated, it’s the same sort of thing the Lib Dem’s have done for years and the Tories are also now seeing political capital in doing, the way our forces are treated, equipped and ultimately paid for the work they do is awful.

But if Griffin is trying to make this an issue, as you seem to be, that middle classes are using the working classes wilfully to fight wars they wish to happen, without much say in the matter then there is no real argument there. That’s not to say it won’t have traction with some people, but those people will be extremely short sighted.

Dear God, when we were on all those marches against the war we were suddenly chardonnay-swilling middle class hoorays indulging our coddled self-importance by supporting Saddam, whatever the class makeup of the crowds.

Now that our wars have turned into the utter disasters we warned that they would be, we’re a bunch of chardonnay-swilling middle class hoorays indulging our coddled self-importance by sending poor working class lads to fight the wars we cheered on.

Just. Rubbish. Must try harder – Exxxtreme Troll Fail.

Douglas, Edgar Griffin himself stated that he joined the conservative party in 1948, so at best he served (as Unity has stated) for a matter of months during WW2.

Now I don’t really care for all this “what did he do” malarky, if you serviced radio’s then you were doing a vital service as much as any pilot, everyone had their job. But for Nick Griffin to a) spin someone else’s father’s actions as a reflection upon them as an individual (clearly not someone that cares about allowing the sins of the father to be the sins of the son) and b) then insinuate through his statement that his father was the opposite of Straw’s dad, it’s just inexcusable nonsense.

You say there isn’t a case here, but there is. Nick Griffin tried to build himself up as being more British, or rather as more anti-nazi, because his father was in the war with the RAF while someone else’s father refused to fight. His father barely served the RAF during the world war, let alone actually “fight” in it as the negative assumption would suggest.

From the analysis, I conclude that Edgar Griffin was in the non-violent branch of the RAF.

@39 “…so at best he served (as Unity has stated) for a matter of months during WW2.”

Until someone supplies details of Edgar Griffin’s service record, the duration of his active service is a matter of conjecture based on circumstantial evidence (at best) and an off-the-cuff statement.

“His father barely served the RAF during the world war, let alone actually “fight” in it as the negative assumption would suggest.”

Firstly, you may use the word “fight” but the quote makes no reference to fighting. And I’m sure there are thousands of WW2 veterans who would be more that a little upset at your assumption that a non-combatant role is less important as your comment implies.

I’m with Shatterface on this one, the article was more than a little premature and potentially a complete irrelevance.

@ 38

Whether you are a chardonnay-swilling middle class hooray rodent or not, if you oppose the war in Afghanistan I am not sure I understand the critical tone of your comment.

My problem is with the chardonnay-swilling middle class hooray rodents who support the war or who seem to be indifferent to its consequences.

40. douglas clark

Lee Griffin @ 39,

I don’t understand how you reach the conclusion – that Griffin Snr must only have served a matter of months in WW2. Griffin Snr. was 17 in 1939, and would have been 23 or thereabouts in 1945. The National Services (Armed Forces) Act of Sept 1939 declared every able bodied man between the ages of 18 and 41 eligible to be conscripted. So it is quite likely, is it not, that he’d have fallen within the purview of that Act in 1940?

Given that it seems to be agreed that he was in the RAF circa 1946/47 it is unlikely he would have been unfit to serve when younger. Whether he got his call up papers, or when, is obviously moot at this time.

Given that Jack Straw was alienated from his father for thirty years or so from the age of ten is perhaps more to the point. And your comment to the effect that no-one should be comparing what their opponents father did seems completely apposite to me.

1 – Yes, politics is not a dad competition.
2 – But if an irrelevant jab turns out to be in Griffin’s own foot, I’ll enjoy it.

Further confirmation that Nick Griffin is full of shite. That simple. End of.
Good work, Unity.

43. Fellow Traveller

Why not demand Mr Griffin’s birth certificate? It could turn out he’s not British!

I think this is a bit of a waste of time, to be honest. Griffin’s father’s war record is of no interest to me and if Nick Griffin is lying on this particular matter it would not change my opinion of him one jot. Really, this is the kind of thing which distracts otherwise intelligent people and leads them into a pointless time sink.

Maybe I should have been clearer, Edgar himself stated he served for two years with the RAF, and that he joined the Tories when he returned from his service in 1948. It is entirely possible that as a part of the RAF he never actually served in WW2, which was Nick Griffin’s claim.

Edgar has stated himself, however, that he was in service during world war 2 as part of the forces stationed in Britain.

I am not questioning his being a part of WW2, I’m questioning why Nick Griffin had to try and get the RAF in to it. Perhaps because of his offensive use of Spitfires and Churchill imagery? I am also questioning, in the context Griffin used this information, the image Nick Griffin was trying to portray. By specifically stating Straw’s dad was convicted for not wanting to fight the nazi’s while his dad was in the RAF for WW2 (which it’s entirely likely that even if he was it wasn’t for very long at all) he is implying his dad DID fight. Now as I’ve said, I think no matter what you are in the services, it’s important, but one thing Edgar did not really do at any point as a soldier in WW2, if we are to believe HIS OWN WORDS, is fight any nazi.

The Mail from 2001 has:

Mr Griffin was in the Home Guard before joining the RAF during the Second World War, serving in the signals section.

For two years he was based in India. ‘I was in charge of a group of around 20 young Indian aircraft mechanics, and I got on very well with them,’ he said.

47. Shatterface

‘Now as I’ve said, I think no matter what you are in the services, it’s important, but one thing Edgar did not really do at any point as a soldier in WW2, if we are to believe HIS OWN WORDS, is fight any nazi.’

It depends on what you mean by ‘fight a nazi’. As far as I’m concerned, anyone who served in the armed forces during WWII was fighting Nazis, even if they never even SAW one. 85% of American riflemen – let alone support staff – never actually took a shot at the enemy: did they ‘fight’? Of course they did. And I’d argue that conscientious objectors who served as medical orderlies under fire or operated in bomb disposal did to.

We should be arguing that their fathers’ records are irrelevant, not downplaying Griffin Sr’s contribution. The fact Griffin raised this issue does not mean we have to play his game.

48. Shatterface

Pagar: ‘Seems to me they are taking the moral high ground and I am permanently surprised that more contributors to this blog don’t seem to get it. The level of comment on any post on Afghanistan here is always derisory and yet it seems to me there is a clear issue of class involved.’

By ‘taking the moral highground’ I meant presenting themselves as if they had a MONOPOLY on opposition to the war, which clearly they don’t – as evidenced by at least one tit outside protesting against Griffin’s appearance under a Stop the War banner. (I mean, what the fuck..?)

Afghanistan is a deeply devisive issue and on any other edition an attack from a panelist on Labour’s record of aggression would have been met with a round of applause. The fact that the response was muted in this instance just shows how badly Griffin performed.

49. Jimmy Sands

I don’t reallt see the point of the argument. He could turn out to be the long lost son of Douglas Bader and he’d still be an odious little shit.

52. Quite.

Shatterface. I’m to trying to question edgar’s record, only his son’s use of language to imply something more grand in terms of engagement, from my opinion, and to use flawed logic that this somehow excludes him from being a nazi.

I think there is much consensus in the comments, but people are going round in circles. Basically, it is irrelevant whether his father fought the Nazis or not. Nick Griffin can still be a Nazi regardless of what his father did, or even anything that he’s done himself. I mean, I know a lot of incredibly homophobic gay people.

The original article adds little to the debate, and merely diverts us from more important issues.

But Straw’s father was happy to let his people burn in the ovens and do nothing to stop the final solution.

@55

Given that public awareness of the holocaust in the UK was virtually non-existant until 1942, and the full horror not revealed until 1945, I reckon it is safe to say that Straw Sr was, like most, in total ignorance of events inside Germany when he made his decision. But don’t let historical fact get in the way of dumb trolling.

Evidence from refugees who escaped in 38 & 39 was good enough for my family to don uniforms. Some died, Straws father benefited without a scratch. If he was in Germany at the time I am sure his application as a Cappo would have been approved.


Reactions: Twitter, blogs
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  12. Elinor Taylor

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    RT @tommilleruk: Did Griffin lie about his own father? http://bit.ly/AVk1o

  16. James Graham

    RT @paulwalteruk: RT @libcon Did Griffin lie about his father’s war record? http://bit.ly/31j2Lt » very murky – not exactly case disproved.

  17. Robert Colley

    Nick Griffin lied about his father on QT http://bit.ly/1oO9JP

  18. Max Brockbank

    RT @Welshracer: Griffin lied about his dad on QT http://bit.ly/1oO9JP // 'People will more readily believe the big lie than the small one'

  19. Tom King

    @charltonbrooker @glinner RT @Welshracer Nick Griffin lied about his father on QT http://bit.ly/1oO9JP

  20. Robert Colley

    Nick Griffin lied about his father on QT http://bit.ly/1oO9JP

  21. Max Brockbank

    RT @Welshracer: Griffin lied about his dad on QT http://bit.ly/1oO9JP // 'People will more readily believe the big lie than the small one'





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