Top 10 Tory ‘out of touch’ gaffes


11:57 am - October 15th 2009

by Paul Cotterill    


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Because I love lists, here is my list of top 10 pieces of real documentary evidence that the Tory hierarchy by virtue of their privileged upbringing, are incapable of government which takes account of ‘real people’s’ experiences. The top 10 is limited to Tory parliamentarians or wanabee parliamentarians, as it would have to be a top 100 otherwise.

No. 10 Anthony Steen, soon to be ex-MP for Totnes, on his inordinate expense claims:

‘You know what it’s about? Jealousy. I have got a very, very large house. Some people say it looks like Balmoral. It’s the photographs that make it look like Balmoral, but it’s a merchant’s house from the 19th century.’

A fairly obvious one in for starters, only down at No.10 because he’s not going to be an MP.

No. 9 Boris Johnson, and his £250,000 per year for a newspaper column as chickenfeed.

Out of touch, certainly, but down at No 9 because you can never be quite sure whether he really believes what he’s saying himself. Indeed he plays up the toff to such an extent that there probably is no longer a distinction between what is acting and what is reality. This is somewhat worrying, as he is the Mayor of London.

No. 8 Alan Duncan, for his view that MPs are treated like shit and forced to live on rations.

Again, an obvious enough one. Higher up than Anthony Steed, because he’s still an MP.

Don’t worry, that the last MP expenses scandal one in the top 10.

No. 7 David Cameron, on not knowing how many houses he owns:

‘Do not make me sound like a prat for not knowing how many houses I’ve got.’

He’s down at No 7 because it may just have been a bit of slip of the tongue. He does want to the prime minister, though, you know, and it wasn’t that long after John McCain had made the same mistake.

No. 6 George Osborne at the Tory party conference, with his ‘We’re all this together’ refrain.

No we’re not. You and many other Conservatives are quite well off, George. Mind you, to be fair, you may lose your job soon.

No.5 Chris Grayling, trying to look like he’s in touch with what’s really going on in the real world, but in so doing making it even clearer that he’s not, by comparing the reality of a Moss Side night out with a US television programme:

Even as someone well aware of the gang problem in our society, it was a shocking and enlightening experience. What was going on there at the time was nothing short of an urban war.’

See also this good coverage.

No. 4 Andrew Lansley, Shadow Health Minister, on not understanding how much, or little, money most people have:

‘A new scheme that will meet the costs if you have to go into a care home. A one off, up-front payment like an insurance premium, of around £8,000 at age 65. It will mean that all you have worked and saved for will be protected if you become too frail and unable to live in your home.’

While this seems innocuous enough to at first sight, only a few moments’ thought raises the question of where exactly pensioners get £8,000 up front from (£16,000 for a couple).

For most pensioners with a home that kind of immediately releasable cash is out of the question, not least since for many lower/mid-income home-owners any wealth they have is tied up in the property value, as to do so has been a sensible decision during the housing boom years.

Releasing sufficient therefore means, perversely, selling some of your home, at a major loss against the property value (and even greater if the home was bought in the property boom years).

Needless to say, Lansley and his Tory backroom team, doing their back of envelope sums, didn’t take account of the real world.

No. 3 Cameron, on liking bad news:

‘Au contraire, an enthusiastic Tory backbencher like me can hardly wait to switch on the Today programme every morning in order to listen to all the bad news.’

While this is a bit of an oldie, it’s in at No. 3 because it’s indicative of what is now clearly a wider Tory way of doing things – talking up their own political hopes at the expense of the people they profess to be wanting to govern, I mean serve.

Thus, Osborne and Hammond’s talking down of the UK’s creditworthiness, and the risk therefore of talking up borrowing costs and therefore the overall national debt, are entirely in keeping with their glorious leader’s Tory Boy boo-boo.

This serious knock-on effect means the No.3 spot is well merited.

No. 2. George Osborne, on the way the financial markets work: ‘No one takes pleasure from people making money out of the misery of others but that is a function of capitalist markets.’

Yes, he really did say that. And yes, I think he meant it.

AND THERE’S A SURPRISE JOINT N0. 1

No. 1 John Redwood, arguing that date rape is simply ‘disagreement between lovers’

While it could be argued that this staggering obnoxiousness is not directly an ‘out of touch’/class matter, I would contend it reflects an ongoing rank misogyny within the ruling class which reflects itself in Tory party institutionalized practice up and down the country. This is not to say that it does not happen within the Labour movement, but I would argue that there have been greater efforts to drive it forth from there, so a No.1 spot is duly accorded to Redwood, who should be, but will not be, ashamed of his 2007 blog entry.

No .1 Louise Bagshawe, PPC for Corby and East Northants, telling her prospective constituents that her children attend ‘local schools’.

A surprise in at No.1, it must be said, but justified in our view.

Bagshawe is supposed to be the acceptable face of the new friendly Tory party, sent off to late night radio stations to tell us all the Tories really have changed. But here she is, on her carefully thought out website – this is no Cameronesque slip of the tongue, patronizing the people of Corby and Northamptonshire, telling them that she wants to be an MP so desperately that she’ll even send her children to their local schools.

For ‘local’, read ‘not private’. yes, the implicit suggestion is that Tory wanabee MPs would of course be expected to enroll their children in private education, but that Bagshawe is so terrible with it that she’s even prepared to send her children to state schools.

This well-considered Tory PR riles me 10 times as much as Anthony Steed’s unthinking snobbery.

And that’s it.

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About the author
Paul Cotterill is a regular contributor, and blogs more regularly at Though Cowards Flinch, an established leftwing blog and emergent think-tank. He currently has fingers in more pies than he has fingers, including disability caselaw, childcare social enterprise, and cricket.
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Reader comments


Heh! Thoroughly enjoyed those (it’s always fun to laugh at the Tories, even if they’re probably going to win the next election), and I’m still seething at Osborne’s nonsense at no.6 – but I hate to say this, you missed out the word “in” from the middle of the quote 🙂

Now, how long will it be before someone comes on demanding a list of the 10 most ‘nannying’/patronising/etc things labour politicians have said?

🙂

You missed Lansley’s “On many counts, recessions can be good for us. People tend to smoke less, drink less alcohol, eat less rich food and spend more time at home with their families.”

Andy @1

Yes, there are a few typos in this one that have slipped through Sunn’y normally meticulous proofing processes. I will have him punished.

Mark @2

Good point. This post, much like Tory policy, was ‘beermat-in-the-pub’ stuff and I’m sure thereare others entries like yours that should have made it in there. No, hold on, Tory policy is ‘beermat-in-the-club’ stuff.

Louise Bagshawe. I’ve read your entry. I’ve gone to the website you linked. Read that.

Erm, have you and Louise had a falling out in the past?

Astateofdenmark @4: No, I just like to be endlessly vindictive towards people who are more important than me and whom I’m never likely to meet, but i’ve decided I don’t like. This is totally impartial, as I’ve also got it in for Tom Harris (Lab) and Polly Toynbee (SDP) and neither of them are at all bothered/even know about my intense loathing either.

It was also a cynical attempt to get readers to read the entry about Ms Bagshawe on my pathetic blog, after I heard her blathering nonsense on the radio once. It’s at http://www.bickerstafferecord.org.uk/?p=1031, but Sunny edited that bit out.

Mind you, I do stand by my views on her use of the term ‘local schools’, which is subtly patronising, at the very least, even if not completely worthy on the No.1 spot).

okey dokey

Paul, I think you’re making rather too much of the “my children go to local schools” thing.

Particularly in making it equivalent to Redwood’s shocking comment about rape (full article).

ukliberty @7: I think you’re right, and thanks for adding in the link to the article, which I left out for some reason. It deserves a further airing given his rise in prominence.

George Osborne: ‘No one takes pleasure from people making money out of the misery of others but that is a function of capitalist markets.’

What is so profoundly worrying about that comment from Osborne is that traders and dealers working for so many of the leading financial institutions in America, as well as Britain, managed to lose many billions for their employers and thereby threaten the stability of the global financial system. Bank lending to businesses seized up and business investment shrank. The inevitable outcome was recessions in most of the world’s leading economies.

The observation of Alan Greenspan, previously chairman of the Board of Governors of the US Federal Reserve Bank, is very illuminating:

“Those of us who have looked to the self-interest of lending institutions to protect shareholders’ equity, myself included, are in a state of shocked disbelief.”
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB122476545437862295.html

If Osborne regards all that as just a necessary, if incidental, part of the way capitalist markets regularly function then he plainly doesn’t understand the causes of the financial crisis and is completely unfit to be Chancellor of the Exchequer.

For those in search of guidance through the complexities of the financial crisis, David Hare’s play running at the National Theatre sheds light. The official programme helpfully includes suggestions on further reading:
http://www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/51316/related-items/the-power-of-yes-our-reading-suggestions.html

I’ve not seen the play but I’m reading through the published text.

10. Dick the Prick

John Redwood on date rape – gadzooks! Now the relative merits of the idea may exist in a world of semantic legality within a courtroom but for Pete’s sake don’t bloody say it. What a prat.

It’s one of the worst aspects of politicians – some of them think they HAVE to have an opinion on any thing that exists; there really are more times when it’s advisable to shut it.

Surely DC’s #3 is a joke? Surely he means that although he wouldn’t wish unemployment on anyone, it does make his job a lot easier if unemployment is going up? Surely politicians of any stripe would agree. It’s not hard to imagine Ken Livingstone saying something like, “I enjoy reading the latest reports on social housing in East London, it makes it easier for me to criticse Boris” or something along those lines.

“A busy mother of three, Louise lives in the constituency in Oundle.
Louise’s two oldest children attend local nursery and primary schools, while the youngest is just two years old!”

This is just the usual sort of rubbish you see on any political profile. Getting from there to

“patronizing the people of Corby and Northamptonshire, telling them that she wants to be an MP so desperately that she’ll even send her children to their local schools.”

is a helluva jump.

You need to get her off the list alltogether.

11 – yup, Cameron used to write a flippant ‘diary of a new MP’ column in the Guardian. That piece is about the pointlessness of being in opposition:

So we can scream blue murder about the need for a democratic upper house without much chance of it actually happening. As a result, this one can run and run. (I told you – I’ve got this opposition thing licked.)

And hyping the Bagshawe biog. as a gaffe is really quite pathetic. She has three children. Two of them go to school. Saying that this is the biggest gaffe made by a Tory is, well, pretty risible.

On a side note, I’ve had a soft spot for Louise Bagshawe ever since her dress fell off during an Oxford Union debate.

Gosh, you lot must be really scared of Louise Bagshawe and her like to trump up such witless allegations against her!

“I’m local, local I am, local as local can be” is standard leaflet-fodder, agreed. But unless Ms Bagshawe is very dim (which doesn’t seem to be the case) she’ll be aware of the connotations that Paul identifies. People assume that most MPs send their kids to private schools – even boarding schools – and that all Tory MPs do. No way is it worthy of number one spot – and given some of the other things the Tories have said, there are definitely ten worse things Paul could’ve highlighted, but it’s worth his making the point somewhere (even if in a separate blogpost).

To recap, stressing their local connections is something all PPCs do to show their connections with the community they want to serve. The thing is, sometimes it’s true – some people were born and brought up in their community, attended local schools, sent their kids to local schools before they even considered becoming an MP – and in some cases it’s a cynical move to try and shorten the distance between someone of their background and the people they hope to represent. In this case it seems like more of the latter, so it’s legitimate to target it.

Oh go on, then. I give in.

Louise Bagshaw plumetts, pop pickers, to No. 11 in the chart, while everyone from 10 to 5 stays the same, with Andrew Lansley coming in with a new entry at no 4, his second on this week’s chart, with:

“On many counts, recessions can be good for us. People tend to smoke less, drink less alcohol, eat less rich food and spend more time at home with their families.” (see Mark @2).

All others go up one place’ but leaving Redwood out on his own as utter out of touch obnoxious git. Or something.

The Bagshawe thing was only a bit of a laugh (see me @5). Anyone fancy a top 10 stupidist things ever said by Polly Toynbee, btw?

16 – Behold the awful power of the blogosphere!

Anyone fancy a top 10 stupidist things ever said by Polly Toynbee, btw?

Only 10?

Ask Tim Worstall, DK and Mr Eugenides, they’ll sort you a top 200…

There are plenty of policy issues to criticise the Tories over, why are you wasting your time listing mildly stupid quotes out of their context?

@ tim f, no. 15:

unless Ms Bagshawe is very dim (which doesn’t seem to be the case)

Actually, some of her pronouncements are simply shocking. See, e.g., here:

http://www.sohopolitico.com/2009/10/louise-bagshawes-bizarre-contortions.html

I am particularly fond of her defence of David Cameron’s refusal to say what he’ll do if Lisbon is ratified before the election, on grounds that “there is no point at all in announcing policy for a situation that may well never happen.” Strewth.

21. the a&e charge nurse

[19] I don’t think its the gaffe per se, Blue Eyes – but what gets revealed about the underlying mindset.

Take No:2 – “No one takes pleasure from people making money out of the misery of others but that is a function of capitalist markets.”

One can imagine such utterances easily dripping from Osborne’s baby face while comfortably ensconced in a members only gentleman’s club, but its the kind of brutal comment that would have any self respecting political spin-meister spluttering into his frothy cappucino?

22. Klaus Westwood

Good article, but I have to take issue with having Bagshawe at No.1. As I read the entry I presumed you were going to reveal that she in fact sent her kids to private schools in the constituency, hoodwinking us by implying they were state educated through using the term “local” – but no, she just sends her kids to local state schools and mentions the fact fairly fleetingly. Its hardly unusual for an MP/PPC to puff their local credentials in ways such as this – I suspect many MPs from all parties use similar phraseology re. their kids schooling in their profiles.

Blue eyes @19

I think that’s actually a very pertinent question.

Yes, to an extent the post is just a bit of fun, born of a beer with a couple of politic-geeky mates in the pub the other night, but the reason Sunny’s chosen to take it over from the site I put it at initially (Though Cowards Flinch) rather than any of the more discursive stuff I and my collaborator Dave do around Conservative policy is worth examining.

It’s fairly well-established that many economists are, at the very least, wary of the Tories proposed economic policies. Yet they are still leading by a long way in the opinion polls. That’s because not that many people read poliy criticism, and many more people read Cameron’s ‘top 10 commitments as exclusively revealed to the Sun’, which I had in mind as target for parody when I wrote this, but then didn’t make explicit.

Top 10 lists, Cameron and his Sun advisers know, are now pretty deeply embedded in opular culture (Channel 4 lists of top films etc etc), and even the engagement here suggests that it is quite catchy, and that a few more people will remember ‘what was at No1 on the gaffe list’ than they would if Redwood’s awfulness was set out in the course of what Sunny refers to as my ‘theses’.

What I’m suggesting that a) attack Tories for bing’out of touch’ is a perfectly legitimate campaign method, only made partially less valid by some NL figures out of touchness; b) that something like this list style, somewhat out of context as it may be (just as Cameron’s top 10 was actually simply wrong in places), andnot exactly like this, obviously, might be quite effective as a campaign tool. Certainly, evidence suggests it’s more effective than dry critique of policy in an environment where the dry critiquers are either not heard/read or are not found credible because of their own misdemeanours.

Sunny, Dave and I have actually been discussing journalism style/epistemology etc at Though Cowards Flinch at some length, should you be interested in pursuing further. See http://thoughcowardsflinch.com/2009/10/12/the-epistemology-of-post-pilger-journalism/ (you can skip the post and go straight to comments, which home in on what i’m referring to here).

Oh, and Tim F from @15 has been discussing this stuff too. Sorry Tim. And Paul Sagar from Bad consience and Kate Belgrave from Hang Bitch, so it may be worth a read.

Klaus @22

Fair enough, Klaus. I’ve already accepted defeat on that one @16. My sense of undue frivolity and lack of regard for the real importance of top 10s in the national psyhce got the better of me. That’ll teach me to go to the pub.

Soho Politco @20

Oh, hadn’t seen that. Great. Take it all back from @16 and @25. Bagshawe goes straight back in at no. 2 (yeah, ok, behidnd Redwood) as sales have surged on the basis of her newly released back catologue. Is it in digital?

#21: “One can imagine such utterances easily dripping from Osborne’s baby face while comfortably ensconced in a members only gentleman’s club, but its the kind of brutal comment that would have any self respecting political spin-meister spluttering into his frothy cappucino?”

Osborne was correct about saying that capitalist markets to function efficiently must punish business failure in order to reallocate resources to other uses which will perform better at producing those things buyers want to purchase.

Two comments are appropriate. Economists have long recognised that markets can send incorrect signals about the true social costs of business activites – hence a daunting literature about the causes – and remedies for – market failure. We got as far as this analysis 50 years ago:

Francis Bator: The Anatomy of Market Failure (QJE 1958) – large PDF file
http://instruct1.cit.cornell.edu/courses/econ335/out/bator_qje.pdf

Since then, other potential causes of market failure have been recognised, notably network externalities (the value of a telephone handset with its network to me depends on how many others have handsets with access to the same network) and information asymmetries (if buyers and sellers lack access to the same information about the product they wish to trade it is unlikely that purchasing decisions and prices will be efficient). The latter applies, among other cases, to healthcare markets but another factor also applies – the prospect of daunting costs should a serious medical problem develop for an individual without insurance cover.

What Osborne somehow failed to notice was that traders and dealers working for many leading financial institutions were contracting transactions which were bankrupting their employers on a colossal scale, thereby jeopardising the entire global financial system with awful prospects for all the major market economies and raising the high likelihood of a global depression on the scale of that in the 1930s.

This behaviour by employees in financial institutions wasn’t regular, sustainable behaviour so questions naturally arise as to why the management of afficted financial institutions allowed it to happen and what can be done to prevent the like of it happening again.

Sadly, the necessary actions of governments in bailing out failing financial institutions are only too likely to promote repeat occurences because the management and traders of financial institutions will be encouraged to maintain a belief that while gains from dealing decisions can be privatised, large losses are socialised to prevent systemic market failures. But those aren’t and cannot be continuing operating rules for capitalist markets.

28. the a&e charge nurse

[27] ‘Osborne was correct about saying that capitalist markets to function efficiently must punish business failure’

Yes, Sir Fred is really suffering for his business failings
http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/standard/article-23571948-bankers-should-repay-bonuses.do

Or did baby-face have the aftermath of Thatch’s attack on the coal industry in mind when he made this comment?
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/2405885.stm
http://pubs.socialistreviewindex.org.uk/sr219/simons.htm

Pouring himself a nice whisky in his posh Eaton Square flat, eh – I’m sure McGregor must have felt very pleased with himself?

28 – Fred Goodwin might not have been punished, but that’s not what Osborne was talking about. He was saying that failing businesses will inevitably be punished by the market. How’s RBS’s share price looking at the moment?

30. Ronnie de Ramper

Louise Bagshawe? I strongly recommend checking out her books

http://bit.ly/1yBlB5

Read through a few chapters, and see how an Oxford degree in Anglo-Saxon & Norse turns you into a “best-selling” author of two million books, while preparing you for a role in your national legislature.

Gasp at how every woman realises her ambition: an impossibly pert bum; marriage to a billionaire; excitement; travel; and the occasional fling

Be awestruck how a Tory Government will make this possible. You too can claw your way from boredom and poverty to a life of unimaginable wealth and luxury by making best use of your ‘assets’.

Sprawl with Louise Bagshawe through endless pages of emetic neo-Mills & Boon

Despair that, under a Tory Government, her books could find their way onto TV and into the national curriculum.

Shudder at what some people will do to get rich

#28: “Yes, Sir Fred is really suffering for his business failings”

Quite – but then a damn fool government minister reportedly approved his pension arrangements with the then nationalised RBS before Sir Fred retired.

“the aftermath of Thatch’s attack on the coal industry in mind when he made this comment?”

Thatcher didn’t attack the coal industry.

The Yorkshire NUM launched upon a stupidly suicidal strike for a year without calling a strike ballot in the region when such massive coal stocks had been pilling up at power stations and pit heads that there was difficulty in finding where to put it all – in fact.

Another embarrassing fact is that both the Thatcher and Major governments poured billions of taxpayers’ money into propping up the coal board before and after the year long strike 1984/5.

Yet another is that both the Labour opposition in Parliament and other trade unions backed off supporting the NUM.

Yet another is that the world oil price – which determined how much the electricity generators paid for coal since they weren’t permitted to import any – almost halved between 1985 and 1986.

For curious reasons, those who complain about Thatcher attacking the coal industry never mention what was happening to world oil prices. It is not self-evident why taxpayers should have gone on spending even more billions propping up the coal board when there were many other budget lines on which the money could have been productively spent – such as schools, hospitals and upgrading the railways.

In the run up to the 1992 election, Kinnock correctly made the point that for all the Conservative’s rhetoric about cutting taxes, tax revenues as a percentage of Britain’s GDP were about the same as when Thatcher took office in May 1979.

Major’s government privatised the nationalised coal industry, not Thatcher.

Btw I didn’t vote at the last election and the last time I was a member of any political party was in 1976 – the year the Labour government at the time had to borrow from the IMF to bail out the Pound.

Well worth reading this news story:

“What the court did not hear was that ‘Major’ Colclough – who in fact has earned six figure salaries in finance in the City of London – is a serial fantasist who once briefly obtained a job at a university in Prague by claiming to be a professor and friend of Stephen Hawking.”

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1219741/Victim-lying-Major-TA-girl-fell-serial-fantasist-said-hed-Army-medic-fighter-pilot-psychiatrist.html#ixzz0U29t5TNE

As well as this report about the Savings and Loan Association crisis in America during the 1980s and 1990s and then asking why no lessons were drawn:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_and_loan_crisis

33. Louise Bagshawe

Er…local schools is not code for anything other than local schools; that our family lives in the consituency, and it’s our home. The school is private. Their father and I liked it, end of story!

34. Dick the Prick

In a case of life imitating stuff never even contemplated the Yanks have just passed a bill in the senate stating that employment contracts can’t be written to include a no sue if raped clause; yet remarkably 30 Republicans voted against it (on Daily Show). Surely rape is rape and whilst every case is different it’s still fucking rape. The worlds gonna mad (unless there were attachments to the bill that would take a bit of reading which I can’t be bothered doing – but still, on the face of it – that’s out of the stadium wrong).

yet remarkably 30 Republicans voted against it (on Daily Show).

Including John McCain. It’s a diabolical intrusion by the socialist government into the freedom of companies to employ rapists and then sack the victims if they complain. Yet more proof…

36. The Grim Reaper

If that’s the best you can do, I think the ultimate list compiling blogger out there, Iain Dale, can sleep easy tonight.

I now have an uncontrollable desire to compile a list of the 200 most stupid things Polly Toynbee has ever said.

Damn you, Liberal Conspiracy!

Never mind Polly Toynbee, I’m trying ever so hard to resist a powerful urge to propose a collaborative effort to rate each MP on four independent scales in the run-up to the election next year:

(1) avarice – as in expenses claims
(2) ignorance – as in the familiar adage: Ignorance is Strength
(3) stupidity – as in claims that the international recession is all down to GB
(4) tribalism – as with never deviates from the party line

Remember this? “Public funds totalling £500 million a year are being spent on an army of at least 29,000 professional politicians in the UK, according to new figures.”
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/feedarticle/8605308

Compare that with the British electorate of more than 44 million.

A salutary insight: I – or you – would become comfortably affluent if every adult in Britain were to agree to pay me – or you – just one penny each year.


Reactions: Twitter, blogs
  1. Holly Combe

    RT @jester RT @libcon: Article:: Top 10 Tory 'out of touch' gaffes http://bit.ly/ICcow

  2. David Cameron

    We are the new modern Conservative Party – in touch with the common people. Ignore this: http://bit.ly/ICcow

  3. antigherkin

    RT davecameroon We are the new modern Conservative Party – in touch with the common people. Ignore this: http://bit.ly/ICcow

  4. antigherkin

    RT @davecameroon We are the new modern Conservative Party – in touch with the common people. Ignore this: http://bit.ly/ICcow

  5. Stefan Laros

    RT @davecameroon: We are the new modern Conservative Party – in touch with the common people. Ignore this: http://bit.ly/ICcow

  6. StopTheRight

    Top 10 Tory ‘out of touch’ gaffes http://alturl.com/czoj #p2

  7. Colin Hall

    RT @StopTheRight: Top 10 Tory ‘out of touch’ gaffes http://alturl.com/czoj #toryfail

  8. Holly Combe

    RT @jester RT @libcon: Article:: Top 10 Tory 'out of touch' gaffes http://bit.ly/ICcow

  9. David Cameron

    We are the new modern Conservative Party – in touch with the common people. Ignore this: http://bit.ly/ICcow

  10. antigherkin

    RT davecameroon We are the new modern Conservative Party – in touch with the common people. Ignore this: http://bit.ly/ICcow

  11. antigherkin

    RT @davecameroon We are the new modern Conservative Party – in touch with the common people. Ignore this: http://bit.ly/ICcow

  12. Stefan Laros

    RT @davecameroon: We are the new modern Conservative Party – in touch with the common people. Ignore this: http://bit.ly/ICcow

  13. StopTheRight

    Top 10 Tory ‘out of touch’ gaffes http://alturl.com/czoj #p2

  14. Colin Hall

    RT @StopTheRight: Top 10 Tory ‘out of touch’ gaffes http://alturl.com/czoj #toryfail

  15. Paul Cotterill

    My Top 10 Tory out of touch gaffes STILL main post at @libcon. Even Louise Bagshawe replied (well she did come in at No1)http://bit.ly/ICcow

  16. Paul Cotterill

    My Top 10 Tory out of touch gaffes STILL main post at @libcon. Even Louise Bagshawe replied (well she did come in at No1)http://bit.ly/ICcow

  17. Cleo Peacock

    The only socially acceptable form of 'bashing'? Tory Bashing http://bit.ly/CImon

  18. Cleo Peacock

    The only socially acceptable form of 'bashing'? Tory Bashing http://bit.ly/CImon

  19. The Bickerstaffe Record » Blog Archive » Cameron top 10 ‘total arse’ episodes

    […] see amateur blogger Iain Dale has followed Liberal Conspiracy’s ‘top 10’ lead (i. e. mine) with a Gordon Brown-based […]

  20. RupertRead

    NIce, educative piece on Liberal Conspiracy » Top 10 Tory ‘out of touch’ gaffes: http://bit.ly/2OeueL

  21. Liberal Conspiracy » Top 10 ways Cameron has made an arse of himself

    […] himself by Paul Cotterill     October 21, 2009 at 8:30 am Following my recently popular Top 10 Tory ‘out of touch’ gaffes, I thought I would follow it up with a focus on the golden boy David […]

  22. RupertRead

    NIce, educative piece on Liberal Conspiracy » Top 10 Tory ‘out of touch’ gaffes: http://bit.ly/2OeueL

  23. Lydia Weber

    Liberal Conspiracy » Top 10 Tory 'out of touch' gaffes http://tinyurl.com/yhou5kr

  24. Blondieblu2

    http://bit.ly/aEtBi5 came across this on internet number 1 is not that surprising really

  25. Paul Cotterill

    @sunny_hundal Back in '09, we made Louise Mensch joint no1 out of touch Tory http://t.co/iJUgWslz They mocked us then. How prescient we were

  26. Mrs Blogs

    @sunny_hundal Back in '09, we made Louise Mensch joint no1 out of touch Tory http://t.co/iJUgWslz They mocked us then. How prescient we were





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