28 days: List of names against extension


12:00 pm - November 23rd 2007

by Sunny Hundal    


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This will become a constantly updated list of public figures against extending the 28 days pre-charge detention period. Please mention those you think are relevant (with links) in the comments below.

All Conservative party members?
All Liberal Democrat members?
(There will be a separate post for Labour MPs)

Lord Goldsmith, former attorney general
“There needs to be a limit to this. And while any limit is arbitrary I thought that we were really in the right place with the decision the Commons ultimately took.” …He saw “no evidence to go beyond 28 days”. [The Guardian]

Ken Macdonald, director of public prosecutions and head of CPS
“It seems to us 28 days has been effective and has provided us with powers, supervised by the courts, that have been useful to us.” [The Guardian]

Lord Woolf, former lord chief justice
“I like very many other people have not been convinced by the case for increasing the period. … I would prefer, myself, to allow them to be charged and if, after they are charged, so that they know what they are facing, they are still subject to questioning, albeit in custody.” [The Guardian]

Jonathan Evans, head of MI5
He refused to say whether he backed the proposal and was described as “distinctly unenthusiastic” by one of those present. [The Telegraph]

Baroness Scotland of Asthal, QC
[The Times]

Vera Baird QC, solicitor-general
Also believes the case has not yet been made. [The Times]

Lord Falconer, former lord chancellor
Does not believe the government had made a coherent case for the extension, and that it would not be justifiable to extend detention beyond 28 days simply because further time was needed to investigate an individual suspect in a complex case. [The Guardian]

Parliament
Joint Committee on Human Rights and Commons Home Affairs Select Committee
[The Guardian]

In the news: The Home Secretary has admitted that there has not been one single case since 9/11 when police enquiries would have been aided by holding a terror suspect for more than 28 days.

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About the author
Sunny Hundal is editor of LC. Also: on Twitter, at Pickled Politics and Guardian CIF.
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Story Filed Under: Blog ,Campaigns ,Civil liberties ,Detention (28 days)

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Reader comments


Lord Woolf pitched in this morning, too – see the guardian’s report at http://politics.guardian.co.uk/terrorism/story/0,,2215972,00.html

And look out for a new Amnesty briefing on Monday outlining the arguments against extending pre-charge detention

worth having a list of those not against – in order to lobby?

if yes: ‘Jacqui Smith has defended plans to increase the length of time police can hold terrorism suspects without charge.’

http://www.epolitix.com/EN/News/200711/2ce823ce-3e55-4c0f-bbe0-5408f65e1e43.htm


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